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SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME London, October 19.

Amom.si' many otheis I am just leeovornig 1 bieathe more freely. When I put clown my toot I don't take it up aqain like a eat on hot bucks No. Duke of l'aiina has Linded the Cesarewitch, and 1 ha\e assisted in ti citing the King to the most tremendous "facer" they have met with m the last few jt.ua. To say the public was onto the Duke of Paiina to a man, is almost a hteial tmtli; consequentl} , the hoise staited (iist favmuute, and in a field of 3(5. lint beyond the public, who didn't get Mind of thu "good thing" till a few days before the lace, the owner, his fi lends, ami the stable, had a very nice time of it lucking their hoise from the liberal puce of ."iO to 1 downwards, and back him they did in pounds, shillings, and pence, till on the day of the race the bookmaker -wcie "sick," and only too glad to turn louml and back him themselves, those "in the swim" readily taking advantage of the "(hedge " on the race. There is nothing much to record beyond the victoiy, almost fiom end to end, of the favourite, Duke of Parma, who nearly pulled his light-weight rider out of the .saddle, till he had his own way — then he went on, and von as he liked. His feather lmjjost, his good breeding, and the amount of money that was placed on him, now make many people wonder how he could have been missed by either themselves or the piophets. If they had known, of course everybody would have been " on " Duke of Parma "to an odd 'un. " and at labt the nug would leally have been broken. The number of lunueis, 30", in this handicap, over more than two miles, should do something to stop the perpetual howl of those who persistently state, m the face ot leason as of fact, that handicaps rum the turf, and that no good field can be got together for a tace of moie than a mile oi so Among the other events of the second October meeting, the match between Lowlander and Galopm was a real sporting affair, and drew greater crowds than have been seen on an off-day for yeais. I ti list they enjoyed themselves, and — as all pleasure should be somewhat qualified — backed the loser. Galopin, at (! to 4, on, maintained the pi estige of weight-for-age aa compared with handicap foim, and, after a splendid race, won by a length. It is something foi an ex-lundle lacei to be matched on even terms with a magnificent specimen of a Derby winner, and though not successful, to make the champion gallop Ins hardest and then only just win The tremendous favountc Loll} pop was nowhcic in the Middle Park Plate, foi which 30 runnei s went up, the winnu being found in Petrarch, a 12 to 1 chance, who almost walked m The betting w,ii pet uhar — 10 to 1 bcii one, and that one, Lolly pop, about 0 to 4 There is a grievance of the spotting repoitcis T have often wished to mention, and that is his helplessness to wnte down any unfairness, in, indeed, to speak his mind at all freely. If a repoiter commits himself m any way to a leference or opinion at .ill prejudicial to "a swell," he is likely to suflci sad inconvenience, as once cou\ icted of "bieaehof privilege " by the stew aids of a race meeting, he could be warned of!', and, .va .1 matter of course, he is mined for life, or compelled to tuin his attention to s nne other means of getting .1 livelihood. In fact, the Jockey Club and cognate stewaidships seem to combine within ceitain limits the seeiet power of the Inquisition and tlu- autocracy of the C'/ir. This is no exaggeration, as those who know best will admit. On Wednesday, theic appealed in a sporting paper some icinaiks on the way in which so-called " Tattei sails tings" are conducted at New - maikct and elsewhere, which, if not wel[ put, wei-j certainly true. On Thursday, they weic m the same paper contradicted, and those who could, or cared to, read between the lines, .it once knew why. The " Tattcusall's nug" is as at present constituted, about the biggest snare possible for the unwary. While anyone who caics to pay the extra can tiansact business theiein, and while the innocent think that in Tattersall s enclosuies there are none but menibeis of Tattersall's, a great deal of harm must of necessity take place, and no amount of " \igilance " on thep.ut ot the police or the " authoiitics, " can prevent it The great match of Peikms \. Trine, to walk 3 miles within the hour, has teinu nated in the victory of the "ped." At lust theie seemed a decided disposition on the pait of professional betting men to back "the enemy," owing, probably, to his wellknown staying power and constant fitness; but it giadually leaked out that the man an well as the hour was ready, and that he could not be in better fettle The consequence was that the odds shifted, and foi Home halt hour before the stait, nothing was heard but olFei* to take 5 to 4 that the task was accomplished. While Perkins was stripping I went in and had a look at him, and must say that his condition rcllected the highest credit un his trainer, II. IJoot. Though the time set for the race was )i\e o'clock sharp, it was not till moie than half past that Perkins toed the maik, and was set going to a siinul tancous snapping of stop-watches He went away at a tremendous pace and with a light springy action, yet without the slightest suspicion of unfairness; and whin he had once settled down his style was magnificent. That he did not break the rules of fair heel and toe was, howe\ei, all that those present cared for, their attention being moie given to the progress of the watch than to the mode of the man. The fust mile was accomplished in (Jmin 4(ise< , the second m 7min. 27soc, the third in 7niin. 27sec, and the tourth in 7nnn. i!2see - - 28nun. .UKec , a peiformance m itselt mmply marvelloiiK and hitheito unequalled. By it Perkins just managed to win a good sum for some ti lends who had the temerity to wager that ho would do foui miles within 2\) minutes Now he appeared to ilag aomewhat, and the baekcis of Time enjoyed a transient gleam of hope ; but it was soon appaient that the eh.impion was taking a slight rest previous to goingstraightaway "home" The fifthnule occupied 7mm 33sec , the sixth 7unn. f)2sec , and then Perkins fell back on 7nnn. 27sec, which brought him to seven miles in the extiaoidinary time -for sciupulously fair walking — of ftlimn Msec. Long odds weic now oflcicd against "the heythcbeaier," and with reason, as Peikms, quickening as lie finished, accomplished the

List mile m "nun IImi , .mil Wat all previous leioids 1 »_> completing unlit links 111 exactly ami olhually 5!>nun .">s« i , .mud much extucnicnt Peikins is 2'A vi«u-> of age, about .">ft (>m. high, .nul posiesses no development of a peeuliai 01 extiaoidinai) ehaiacter visible to the naked eye. But he is, taken all lound, undoubtedly the hc-.t walker yet seen I'ight miles have him walked, or rather covered, in the hour befoie, both by Topley and Spooner, but uot faiily. The cricket season of 1 87."> may now be consideied a thing of the past, notwithstanding the despeiate dibits made to keep it going up till Christmas In an article which, stiangely enough, is called " A He tiospective Glance at the Tast Season."— as though such a look-out behind could be called pi ospective— and which 13 published 111 a spotting paper, there is a good deal of useful, well-condensed mfoi tnation — an amount winch, in fact, more than compensates twenty tnne^ over foi the loosely woided title ■which my bypeictiticism will not allow to pass unnoticed I'eihaps the most interesting item in this is the statement that matches between North and South aie very expensive affairs, chiefly because "though a good lepiesentative Noith eleven may be engaged for t7">, a .South team (including the ' two (iiacet> ') would cost moie than C100, withj other expenses. " Theie is also another icferencc, in the same aiticle, to the fact that these two brothers icquire and receive, more money for their sei vices than other players, as well as an indication that this disparity causes dissatisfaction in the ranks of those who ai e paid openly and who do not get so much foi their sei \ ices That the brothers (irace aie well w 01 thy the higher figure I, for one, fieely admit, and think it wrong that other professionals should grudge them the money they so w ell earn ; but I think it iniquitous that, in the face of this almost open statement of affairs, in the face of the geneial knowledge tli.it the Graces have a settled lii«h figuie— " a fan day's wages for a fair day's work" — 111 the face of common sense and all pist lpgulations that these biotheis should --till eon tinuc to swell the ranks of the amateuis Yet the spoiting p^iper which makes the statement does s'o as a matter of couisc, and appends no lemaik whatever, though it is to spoiting papers, 1 presume, that we should look for guidance and coinfoit undci such nnsfoitune. Nobody adimus the Graces' play moie than I do, and tin-, very admiration makes me regret that they do wot conduct their professional aiiangements openly an<l as professionals should. What ■with the snobbery so conspicuously a featuie of amateurism at athletics, and the dis guised professionalism which constitutes the chief gentlemanly featuie of cricket, the title gentleman-amateur may well stink — as indeed it does — in the nostiils of an interested public. I wish that the conductors and planners of athletic and other sports w ould see the advisability of discontinuing a principle which allows of first and second in each heat running in the final. The second in a tnal should not, if the running in that trial be correct, be able to defeat his conqueror in the iinal ; if he does, then there is more reason than ever for discontinuing an arrangement w hich so signally fails m doing that which it professes to do. C'vmballo.

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME London, October 19., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXI, Issue 5693, 11 December 1875, Supplement

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SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME London, October 19. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXI, Issue 5693, 11 December 1875, Supplement

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