Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE Daily Southern Cross.

LUCEO, NON URO If I h&vt been cxtin^iiihod, \ti there rU« A thouMiid bt»con» irom tbo »p»rL 1 bor*.

THURSDAY, JJiy'KVBER t, 1873.

Mr. Woodward, recently a candidate for provincial honours, in his speech to the Pakuranga electors at Otahuhu the other week, said that in the event of Ins being elected he would advocate a system of araol management I,y which prison labour could bo mado self-support-ing. His idea is a good one, although it is not new. The plan is that instead of being kept continually breaking stones, the prisoners should, on entering the prison, be made to work at their several trades, and that the articles made by them should bo sold. He calculated that the proceeds of their labour would be more than sufficient to pay for their maintenance. In such a case the surplus should be given to them on the day of their leaving the gaol. As regards the " self supporting" system it is hardly necessary to say that it has been tried in many places, but in the majority of oases it has not been successful. In San Francisco, however, the great penal establishment at Sing Sing has proved to be a prominent exception. That establishment has not only been mado to repay its cost, but, after making the prisoners a handsome allowance on their discharge, the Government actually aerivo a large revenue from the prison. On the arrival of a convict at Sing Sing he is set to work nt his ouu IuJl, and nt tlie expiration of his term of imprisonment the total amount of his earnings, whilst confined, is calculated, and he is allowed a certain per centage on that amount. i( a prisoner has no trade or profession m which he can be usefully employed, he is taught one, and if he be anxious to etirn an Iionest liTinf; wlien lio becomes a iroo man, he has every opprtunity of learning a useful trade. In that prison, which is described as being one of the most corapleto institutions of tiie kind in the world, well-skilled representatives of every trade are to bo found. As a consequence, a very large amount of work is done by the prisoners for the public at large. Indeed, at one time there was incarcerated a watchmaker, with a very high reputation for bIuII, and during the whole time he was in the establishment thero waa quite as much work done by him in his trade, as by any free watchmaker in San Francisco. Prison labour in San Franciscois self-supporting, simply because thero are inducements offered to the prisoners to do their work. The more they earn the better for thctusehes, and should aman show himself particularly anxious todo well, he will obtaina mitigation of sentence. Thus, there arc two great inducements to work held out, first, a shorter sentence; secondly, a sura of money (largo or small, according to the amount that the prisoner's work has realised) with which to commence life anew. In a small place like Auckland, however, it may perhaps be doubted whether this system would pay. In the Pontridge Penal Establishment, the largest prison in Victoria, it was and is being tried, but without suceess, as the compensation offered is so ridiculously small that prisoners will not trouble themselves about it. If a prisoner is required to do anything harder than the " Government stroke" he must be offered something by way of payment more tangible than is yet given in Pentridge Gaol. In Auckland prison the number of convicts is on the average only a little over a hundred, and therefore a wide system of classification of work may be more diflicult than in large establishments. Yet the subject ia one which is attraoting the consideration of governments, jurists, and philanthropists, all over the world, and a trial might fairly bo attempted. Wo direct the attention of our new Superintendent and the new Council to the subject.. It would not be difficult to obtain a classification of the prisoners as to their trades, or their proficiency in them j und from such classification, with a report on sundry trials of their skill, sufficient information could be obtained as to lead to a calculation of probable results. Ono point has to be borne in mind, and that is, that convict labour in prisons should not be permitted to compete disastrously with the outside labour of free- honest mou. This waa long in the prisons of Great Britain a sonous difficulty, because it was felt that the public money expended in punishing criminals, was being employed in enabling conviots to drive the free workmen into the slough of less work and lower wages. This stumbling block exists largely in the prison of Sing Sing. Thero the work ia done so cheaply, as in the case of the watchmaker rofeiml to, that outsido work comes m very fust to the detriment of tlio free workman Some provision id necessary to prevent an injustice like this. Kvon in road woik there is an unfair competition withlreo labour ; although the ratepayers bonolit to a certain extent, yet the homst labourer's work is by so much lessened So long aa prisoners are employed on purely public works of a Governmental character, suoh as harbours of refuge, do

objection can arise ; but in ordinary trades, unless in those which supply the clothing and utensils required in the gaol it*elf, and these only, convict competition will nlwaya be more or loss open to the samo objection. However, in a new country, where labour is well paid, the evil will be less felt than in place* where wagea are low, workmen plentiful, and work occasionally precarious ; and therefore 1 , while this dilGculty ihould not be lost sight of, the whole subject of prison labour being made remunerative is one deserving the attention of our authorities. It may be added that the Governor of Dunedin Gaol, reckoning the amount of road work performed by the prisoner! and tho other work done within the walls of the prison, claims not only that the labour of that establishment has met the prison expenditure, but that there has been an actual proQt on tho business. Thi9 is perhaps a sanguine new of tho subject; but at least in that prison something considerable has been done in the direction of tho self-supporting syitem. We see nothing to prevent the example of Dunedin being followed tentatively, at least, in Auckland.

Owing to the pressure of local and other reports we have been obliged to omit a portion of leading matter already in. type, and several local ai tides, &o. His Honor the Chief Justice held a sitting 1 in banco yesterday. An application was made in Harris v. iMacfarlj.no to dissolve an injunction reatraming the defendant from flonting timber down the Waitekuri Creek, I at Wha.ug.ipoa The application was mado on the ground that the defendant had obtained a licence to use the creek from the Superintendent, under the Floatage of Timber Act. The other aide contended that the \ct did not contemplate the use of dam3 and thi> dnving of log«i After a long argument the outline of whuh will bo found in another column, his Honor decided ho could only .liter the injunction <-o as to allow tho defendant to tloat logs down the crsek when in iti natural state — In Craig v. Richmond Mr Oiliiea showed cause why a writ of attichment should not issue against Mr. Richmond for misconduct in hia professional capacity. He concluded by applying that the costs of the proceedings might be visited j on tho solicitor on the other side, to mark the Couit's sense of the impropriety of his conduct in the matter. Tho argumtnt will be resumed to-day. A meeting of the shareholders of th« Imperial Crown Goldmining Company was | announced to be held at tho Company'* o&ce yesterday afternoon, but, owing to tho smalluess of tho meeting, it was adjourned uut'l a future date. The time and business of the next meeting will be found in our advei tising columns. Mr. Thomas Shailer Weston is gazetted D.-,tnct Judge of the Ea«t Coast District Couit, under the Districts Court Act, 1858; and Mr. Frederick Green Skipworth has been gazetted Clork of the District Court of Gisborne. At the Police Court yesterday ons woman was punished in the usual way for drunkenness. Two charges of vagrancy were withdrawn. G. S. Graham, Esq., was the presiding magistrate. We are sure the friends of Mr. Frank Hamley (aon of Lieut. -Co], Hamley, C.B., who was stationed so long in New Zealand, and latterly for many years at Auckland), will be glad to hear that he has received a commission in the Control Department, and is stationed in Manchester. An adjourned meeting of the Pioneer Lodge of dood Templars was held yesterday evenng, at the new Temperance Hall. The business was of tho ordinary lodge nature. A meeting of the Improvement Commis sionera took place yesterday. Among other things it was decided to purchase tho Highstreeot Wesleyan Church A report appear* in another column of tue present iasu<}. The Queen's Vanity Troupe, consisting of a number of (irat-class artistes, will make their debut before au Auckland audience this evening, at 8 o'clock. A most attractive programme appeals elsewhere. The Koman Catnohes at the Thames aie setting a woithy example for proTidmg school accommodation for their children in that district. IS'JO hive been subscribed for the erection of Conveut Schools in Willoughby-streefc, and during the present week £200 have been paid for a couple of allotments on the beach, and £150 set a9ide for a school-house, to be erected immediately. We learn from our Thames morning contemporary that tho plunger for the Pnmping Association's pumps, which was oast on .Saturday evening at Price's foundry, waa dug out of the Band on Tuesday, and i3 to all appearance a perfect job. Preparation! were at once made for fixing it in the lathe, «o as to turn tho surface down to the requisite dimensions — 24 inches in diameter. Tho contractors for the works upon the new street from the end of Welleslay-street to Symonds-stieet have been pushing rapidly ahead since the good weather set in. The main sewer up the centre of the street has now been begun, and yesterday a commencement was made in laying the kerbing on the North side of the new street. When finitbed the thoroughfare will form a liuo outlet to those residing in the western part of the city. At a late houi last evening there were five persons confined in the lock-up— three for vagrancy, and two for drunkennesa. They will be brought before the Police Court this morning to answer for the charge! entered against them. The resignation of tho Hon. Mr. Sewell of his seat in the Legislative Council is gazetted, 1 and tho Governor's acceptance of the same. We understand that his Honor the Superintendent has consented to be chairman at the banquet to the champion cricketers this evening, in the Choral Hall, and his Worship the Mayor will be vico-chairman. The Papakura annual raoes are to be held on the 24th. An advertisement giving th« necessary particulars appear! in »aoth«r column. We have been informed that the oopi«s of Dr. Buller's work upon the Birds of New Zealand coming to Auokland subscribers haTe been forwarded by the * HindoaUn, whioh may be expected here in the course of ft fortnight or three weeks. Mr. T. B. Gillies, the late Superintendent of the province, has praotioally resumed hii profession as a barrister, having appeared in Banco yesterday in the case of Craig v. Richmond. The sittings of the East Coast District; Courts »re fixed by warrant published in tho New Zealand Gazette as follows .--For Civil and Criminal business the court shall bo held in the Provincial Government Buildings at Napier, in the Province of Hawke's Bay, in every year, at intervals of not less than six nor more than seventeen days between the first day of e»ch sitting ; And at the Court House at Waipawa, in the wd Province, at intervals of not loss than fiftysix nor more than aixty-three day§ between tho tint day of each sitting: And at the Court House at Gisborne, in the said District, at intervals of not lesa than ninety-one nor moro than one hundred and five days botwoeu the first day of eaoh sitting. The East Coast District has been proclaimed a Dibtrict under tho District Courts Act, 1S58 The bouudanes of the Distriot aie given in tho New Zealand Gazette published on the 27th November. The powers belonging to the Government under the 22nd section of The Neglected Clnldrens Act, 1867, have been delegated to 't!i3 Superintendent of Otago, to ho exercised by him within that province. Tho election of Mr. John Williamson til Superintendent of this province has been published in tho flew Zealand Gazette.

We take the following paragraph from the Lijtirttou Tnno* of the 20th November: "It was stated on authority yesterday that Mr. Redwood had refused an oflkrof 900 guineas for Luilme from au Auckland gentleman. The price for the mare at Mr. Noaworthy's a.ilo was 7.">0 guineas." A meeu.ig of the momber3 of the Domain Board was held yesterday, at noon, in theCity Council Chamber. A good deal of business was transacted, a summary of which appears in another column. The Superintendent warns the public not to cut, fell, or remove any timber on lands belonging to the natives, the title to which has not been determined ky the Native Lands Court ; and aieo not to fell or remove any timber from the waste lands of the Crown in this province, without first having obtained a license to do «o. This notice is rendered necessary in con»equenoe of the roekless way in which the valuable kauri and other timber of this province has been cut and rsmoved without leave or license. A license to cut and remove timbor can, we believe, be obtained by the payment of £5 per annum. Ihe Superintendent ii quito right in looking after the assetf of the province, and, if it be necessary to raise money for the purpose of education, settlement, roads, &c, it is hotter to raise it upon our forests than by the levying of a poll tax. It is to be hoped that the appeal which he makes to the Highway Boards will not he in vain.

Mr. James Plunkett will read selections from various authors, this evening, iu St. Patrick's Hall. A soiree, in aid of St. Matthias' Churcb, Panmure, will be held in the school-room at that placo on Friday, the T>th instant. The Lynch Family of Bellnngers will open in Auckland on the lGth instant. There will bo no practice of the Harmonic Society this evening. On Tharsday, Dec. 11, the usual practice will be held. Tenders are invited for the construction of the Thames Water Race. Tenders arc invited for the construction of the Summit Contract of the WellmgtonMastertou Railway. An Kxtraoidinary meeting of the New Gold™ Pa G M.Co. will be held on January 5, 1874 Messrs. Cruickshank and Co notify that they will undertake the sale of wool consigned. to their London A^ent. A extraordinary meeting of the Union Steani daw, Moulding, Sash, and Door Company will be held at the Canada Buildings, on Thursday, the 11th instant. Tenders are iuvited for the taking down of a building at the Albert Barracks, and removing and re-erecting the same at Newmarket.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18731204.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE Daily Southern Cross., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXIX, Issue 5082, 4 December 1873

Word Count
2,590

THE Daily Southern Cross. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXIX, Issue 5082, 4 December 1873

Working