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THE Daily Southern Cross.

If T hi'cl < ( n ' 'in ill-,1i 11 -, 1 i 1, \el tl.cio 11 o .\ Uioii . i'u in. uu!i iwi i t lit -.; ink 1 boie.

TUESDA V, SEPTEMBER 10, 1872.

No one ever doubted that Mr. Stafford is a good Parliamentaiy strategist. Indeed, as was observed by Mr. Vogel on one occasion, the member for Timaru was rather disposed to look with contempt on the late Government on this score, whose members were in the habit of bringing down their several measures from time to time in an unostentatious manner, and who on all occasions told the House in plain language what they meant. They were not masters of strategy. But, after all, stratagem without policy, and especially without principle, is a very poor substitute for .statesmanship. The colony had a sufficiently conclusive illustration of this during Mr. Stafford's previous tenure of office ; when, instead of a reduction in current expenditure of two or three hundred thousand pounds per annum —the " stratagem" on the part of the honourable member for Timaru, which at that time told with the House—the colony was subjected to a fresh! native war, extending over the whole term of his administration^ from 1865 to 18G8, and which was only terminated 'on the accession of the Fox- Vogel Ministry to office. The retrenchment, meantime, wo are left to suppose was deferred to a more fitting opportunity. There can be no doubt that the system of "strategy" in this sense was largely resorted to during the late contest on the want-of-confi-dence motion. -The small majority of three in a House of 79 members, taken in connection with the heterogeneous character of the elements of which that majority is composed, is a sufficient indication of the fact, even if more direct evidence were wanting on this point. But such evidence is only too abundant. Man\ persons have ex-, pressed surprise that any of the Maori representatives should have voted with Stafford's party, in opposition to: the late Native and Defence Minister, who, it is well known, was the most popular man in the House throughout the debate, and who is at . at all times 1 the special favourite of the native people. But the explanation is not far to look- for. The Maori members, we may suppose, are no more invulnerable to the wiles of " stratagem" than some of theii* more pretentious compeers in the Assembly. Mr. Stafford's liberal promises to the natives are sufficiently, indicated in his own words, as reported in the daily papers :—": — " He would be '• prepared to divide the imalienatedj "oopJOiscatpd, lands among. them as W ''! act of grace and policy." '* JHow -we, look' upon* sdcli 1 a ! t promise,; as unwise and 'perilous in the extreme', 1 fcomirig

from one in the position occupied by Mr. Stafford— bidding for office, and bargaining for Maori support. It is to raise expectations which manifestly can never be fulfilled. No New Zealand Parliament would venture to sanction the course which is here proposed to be carried out. Already a very large proportion of the confiscated lands, which have cost the colony so dear y, have been handed back to the natives under a variety of pretences, and to some extent, povhapa, this was justifiable. But no Government since the rebels were driven out of the Waikato has ever contemplated such a thing as the wholesale handing over of the residue of the confiscated 'territory. It is not simply the value of the lands themselves which would lead us to protest against such a policy. We contend that the act would be a retrograde movement in the cause of colonisation, and would inevitably prove dangerous to the peace and good government of the country. We trust that no such experimenting in native concerns will on any account be resorted to by the new Government. Even if we had no previous experience of his management of native affairs, such a proposal from Mr. Stafford would lead us to question his fitness in any respect to interfere in questions of this nature. We must say that, with this wild proposal before us, in connection with yet other engagements with native representatives into which it is rumoured he has entered, we look with no little misgiving on the novel suggestion of Mr. Stafford himself becoming Minister for Native A ffairs. Of all others named in connection with the proposed new Cabinet, what qualification has Mr. Stafford for such an office '? We sincerely trust some other disposition of its members can be made, and that at least this part of the programme will not need to be carried oat. Nothing, we confess, is more ominous of the future, to our mind, than these indications of a desire to return to a system of injudicious intermeddling with native affairs on the part of men possessed of neither knowledge nor aptitude for such duties. We could perhaps better afford a fresh series of blunderings in all other department of the public service taken together, than in this single one of native affairs. Almost any other class of difficulty could be easier borne by the colony, and its prospect contemplated with patience. For this reason we again express the hope, that whatever may be the political exigencies of the new Government — whatever shift they may be put to to secure a working administration — they will at least be able to find some one willing to occupy the position of Native Minister who will be likely to have correct notions of native policy, and who will not think it necessary in the interests of political strategy to either stultify the colony in respect to its former proceedings in native affairs, or embroil it in fiesh troubled in connection with such affairs for the future.

Etjmouk, with her thousand tongues, is still busy ab work in devising a suitable programme for a new Ministry. Our latest telegrams announce that Mr. Fitzherbert has consented to make one among the number, and, in that event, will, we suppose, hold the post of Treasurer. The other members, it is said, will be Messrs. Gillies, E-eid, and Curtis. But it is far more probable that the " cast " of the new Ministry has yet to be determined. It is stated that when the House meets to-day Mr. Stafford will* ask for a further adjournment for three days, or possibly for a week. It is clear that there is but little prospect of a strong working Government being formed out of the discordant elements of which Mr. Stafford's following is composed. Several attempts at agreement have failed already. A deputation waited on the Hon. Mr. McLean, requesting him to join the new Government ; but that gentleman, we are informed, politely refused. The Hon. Mr. Waterhouse was also earnestly urged to accept office, but it is stated he has definitely declined to join Mr. Stafford. Great desire is expressed on all sides that Mr. Yogel and Mr. McLean should coalesce, but whether or not with any prospect of sue-, cess we are not informed. The resignation of Mr. Fox's. Government is not yet formally accepted, but this will probably take place to-day. Various rumours are afloat as to the forthcoming candidates for the Auckland Supermtendency, but we assume that this is hardly a question to be disposed of at Wellington. The electors of this province will have something to say in the matter, and it is to be hoped that when the time for doing so has arrived they will consider wisely and well before coming to a decision on so important a subject. Meantime the prospects of good government for the colony are none of the brightest, but we must wait the slow progress of events, and not lose heart so long as there is any possibility of an opening, however obscure or remote. According to present appearances the session is likely to be a protracted one, and honourable members will probably have the opportunity granted them of fully earning all .the remuneration they are entitled to by law for a single year. "<

The impartiality of the telegrams sent by the New Zealand Press Association having been called into question, the Manager of that Agency has addressed the following letter to the Wellington Independent : — "Sir,— Mr. John White, in the debate last night, stated that he was prepared to prove that the New Zealand Press Association was being used in the interests of the ' Govern' ment. I challenge him to do so. lam solely responsible for the Association's Parliamentary telegrams, and have never been influenced ' by any one, nor "'has any one ever attempted to influence me in regard to their compilation. > I endeavour to confine - them exclusively to a fair, impartial condensation of what is said. If I unintentionally imparted any bias into .them, it would .certainly not lean to the side of the Government, for personally I am, and have always, been, an avowed political opponent of the present Ministry ; but I do not consider it my duty to obtrude? my own views in telegrams which are paid! for by newspapers of all shades of opinion. , With regard to infcerprovincial news, I can only say that I believe the majority of ours local agents are gentlemen holding views opposed to those. of the Ministry. — I am r &c, j E. T. GilloNj Manager N.Z. Press Association." We are perfectly satisfied with thej accuracy "of Mr. Gillon's statements, thej bitter animosity which fexists be'tweeh/t^e late Premier and" Mr. Gillon being matters, of ,nqtoriety, The .telegrams Jaave^qretteer, ,' in every instance, , borne tJie stamp* of <im~! partiality; and their character jhas been' fully! vindicated by the 'i/ajwar#'Teporta it whi6hj hays 'sjuce come to hand.

An accident of a painful but not of a very serious nature occurred on the railway works yesterday morning. A navvie named Thomas Balis, one of the labouser immigrants by the 'City of Auckland,' went to work on the line for the first lime. His earliest efforts to bo useful brought about a casualty through which the man now lies in a crippled state. He was in the act of tipping an earth-laden wagon, when the box of it having been unskilfully ballasted— one side being much heavier than the oppositecaused the accident. The tilting was partly effected, when from the cause stated the box turned back on its pivot, a projecting piece of timber forming part of the framework striking Balls very severely on the shoulder, by which he was knocked down. Lifted up by some of his fellow-labourers, the man was immediately conveyed to the Hospital, wheie he was attended by Dr. Goldsbro', the medical officer appointed to the railway works. The patient was found to be severely hurt, but happily not more so than a few days in bed under proper medical attendance will suffice to restore to his normal Btate of health. A large Beotion of the ratepayers would feel a deep curiosity satisfied if some member of the City Council would move for and obtain a return of the annual expenditure for maintaining the pump opposite Mr. Shalders's shop, Queenstreet, in working order ; and the water of the well to which it is attached, in its native purity. There never was such a troublesome, not to say vicious pump, belonging to any Corporate body as this is to ours. Sometimes it is the handle that is out of order, sometimes the sucker, at other times one of the valves or the very pipe itself, It must be a source of great emolument to those employed on it. There are three labourers and a machinist engaged, on an average, about five days in the week. .For hours together the pump will not yield a bucket of water in return for some fifty buckets sent down the throat of it. Then it will make a gurgling noise, as if it had arrived at a consciousness that it was bound to do something for all the pains and monoy laid out on it, when it suddenly belches forth a stream of foul-smelling, muddy, unusable water. This is a signal for a new set of operations. Up comes the pump. A windlass is placed over the hole, a rope is attached to the windlass, and a bucket to the rope. Two men turn a handle, while another bales out for ten hours a day for three consecutive days. Then the water perhaps becomes sufficiently sweet for culinary purposes. On goes the pump again with repaiied suckeis, valves, and joints, when lo ! there comes the stream of muddy water again, nobody knows why or how, except perhaps those engaged on it, and paid by day-work. The inhabitants in the vicinity of this pump say that, as a rule, the labour required to get a single bucket of water is equal to that required to lift half a ton weight to the height of the highest brick chimney in the neighbourhood. And not a member of the Oity Council appears to be aghast at it, or evinces the slightest desire to acquaint himself with the extraordinary phenomena which surround this pump and well, with all thereto belonging. The lecture advertised to be delivered last evening by Mr. F. Jiattley was postponed, in consequence of there being so few persons present. The audience numbered between 20 and 30. Captain Daldy explained that there were several other attractions in the city which served to keep the people away, the principal being the panorama at the Yonug Men's Christian Association .Rooms j and although Mr. Battley would be only too happy to speak if there were only half as many present, he (Captain Daldy) did not think it would be fair to allow Mr. Battiey to deliver his lectuie to such a small audience. He then moved that the lecture should be postponed for a fortnight. The motion was seconded by a gentleman present ; and, after a few remarks from the Rev. Mr. Warlow Davies and Mr. Battley, the meeting closed. We are informed by Mr. Lackland, Messrs. Brogden and Sons' manager on the Auckland and Morcer Railway, that the statement made by Mr. Rees in the Police Court on Saturday, and published in our yesterday's issue, muot have been made under a total misapprehension of the leal facts of the case. Already sixty of the |. navvies who arrived by the 'City of Auckland' are ab work on the railway, and there is plenty of employment for the rest, but a number of the men who have a little money decline to commence work for a few days. In explanation of the statement that the men are being tnrned out of , the Albert Barracks, Mr. Lackland informs us that, as they are employed on various sections of the line from Newmarket to Otahuhu, they have simply received orders to obtain lodgings in the vicinity of their work. So far from refusing to employ the men at once, the contractors would' only be too glad to see them all at work on the li'ie ; but some of them appear to think that while they have enough money to get food and liquor, and are provided with free lodgings at the barracks, to work would be foolish. According to a proclamation recently issued, the following new regulations are in force, viz. :— (1.) That telegrams of the General or Provincial Government, parked urgent, General Government telegrams having precedence ; (2) telegrams relative to the arrest of criminals or persons accused, or the discovery or prevention of crime; (3) telegrams relating to cases of pressing sickness, 1 or death, may be transmitted in priority toi any other. Subject to the above exceptions, all telegrams will be transmitted according to the order in which they may be received ; and, in order to prevent a monopoly when ■ several telegrams are presented for transmission, no officer shall transmit more than 200 words of any telegram at one time. This evening the Naval Brigade Minstrels will give a concert in aid of the £unds. The concert is designated under the head* of " Negro," which it is to be presumed means that the singers and instrumentalists will blacken their faces and hands previously to coming before an audience. The performances are announced under the patronage of Major Gordon, Captain Dargaville, and members of the Volunteer companies. Thei-e is to be a ball after theeutertainment. Messrs. L. D. Nathan and Co. have on view at their stores three cases of dried fish '.from, the fish-.cu'ring establishment of Messrs. Perston and McLeod, at Whangarei Heads. One case contains a fine sample of hapuku or wapuku (known as the New Zealand turbot). This fish is a species of cod. 'It is large, and possesses a very rich flavour. ' The sample prepared by Messrs. Perston and McLeod is intended for immediate consumption, as the fish is too rich to keep for any length of time. The second sample at Messrs. Nathan and Co.'s is dried schnapper, which seems to be, in excellent condition The third case contains young shark, or, as it is termed, New Zealand ling. It is well preserved, as js esteemed a great delicacy, by the natives. The District Court will sit this morning to settle the schedule of contributions in the , Golden Gate Goldmining Company. There are seven objectors, and, as the whole of these have engaged the professional services of, counsel, the hearing is likely to occupy the greater part of the day. - Return of sick treated during the week, ending Saturday, Sep'tsmbe'r 7,1872, at, the Provincial Hospital :— Remained last re- 1 turn, 65; admitted* sin~ce, 19 ; discharged, 19;, died, 0;. remaining, 65 (males, 6l; females, 4). Arrangement of - cases t Fever (typhoid),l;' syphilis, 4 ; rheumatisn*, 4 ; phthisis; 6 ; ophthalmia, 1 5 lj meningitis, 2;, 'ague, 1 ; paralysis, 4 ; bronchitis, 2 jj aneurism, 1 j hearS disease, 1 j dyspepsia,; 2 ; diarrhoea, 1; fistula, 1 ; burn,l ; pneumonia, 2; 1 wounds and contusions, 5 ;lj abscess and ulcer, 4 ; caries and necrosis, 4 ;' fractures, 3 ; dislocation, 1 ; general debility, ; 5 j colic, 1 ; scrofula, 4. No death occurred; during the week. • '< ' r ;

By our advertising columns it will be seen* that»Messrs. Brfjgden invite tenders for~tfie, timber required in' th'^ dobfetruetioh of tW various railway-bridges, l^^een New^rketj and Drnry." : " j:i / < t

The colonial drama of "Hazard" — admitedly the best production by the author, Mr. W. Cooper— wag produced for the first time in New Zealand, at the Theatre Royal, Grahamstown, on Saturday night Mr. B. N". Joncr, the spirited lessee, whose reputation as a successful caterer to public amusement is of the first order, had spared no pains to make a hit with the new piece, both aa regards scenic effects and good casting. I think I may say there is a treat in fetore for you Aucklanders, it*>being Mr. Jones's intention to run it for a few nights in your city.- [Thames Conespondent.] A rather important notice appears in outadvertising columns from Mr. C. Tylden respecting the methods adopted at the Papakura snk-yaidson sale days. He makes a complaint nbout a matter which the auctioneers referred to should in future prevent. The interests of the settlers who send their cattle for disposal ought to be studied as much aa the convenience of stockdrivers who attend the sale. The members of the Artillery Rifle Club will parade this morning at the Mount Eden butts for the usual monthly firing. A lecture is to be delivered this evening in the Young Men's Christian Aasociation < room by Mr. W. L. Rees, in favour of the Auckland Permanent Co-operative Building and Investment Society. The lecturer is to explain the nature, objects, and advantages of that Society. We understand that there are now nearly 1,200 shares taken ; and what wag anticipated when the Society was established would be -the greatest difficulty has been found in practice to be non-existent. We allude to lending out the money received at 10 per cent, interest. Instead of money lying with the Society unused, we learn that it has received more applications for advances than it can meet. The interest paid is high, but the convenience of repaying it in weekly instalments has been found sufficiently attractive. For March the monthly return of the Suez Canal Company shows that the traffic continues to increase ; the number of vessels that passed through the canal during March was 111, and the tonnage 116,274, against 69 vessels and 72,937 tons in 1870-71, and 53 vessels and 47,793 tons in 1870. The receipts for tolls amounted to 1,353.434fr., making, with other resources, 1,372,675fr. or an increase of 447,819 fr., on 1871, and of 725,087fr. on 1870. According to the census of 1861, the numbers of the various Protestant denomirfations in Treland were :— Established Church, 691,509; Presbyterians, 523,300; Methodists, j 45.390 ; Independents, 4,530 ; Baptists, 4,225 ; Quakers, 3,695 : total, 1,272,649. The Roman Catholics numbered 4,505.414]; and there were, Jews, 386, with 19,784 persons whose religion was not specified. A new system of casting type is said to be coming into vogue in England, the type being cast in syllables, enabling an average compositor to set five thousand ems an hour. The invention ha 3 been patented. At the recent trial in Paris of Leroy dv Bourg, for the murder of his wife, his counsel . objected to all the bachelors on the jury, and had his client tried by married men. He was sentenced to five years' imprisonment. The month of June was exceedingly hot in London, the thermometer standing as high as 90 degrees in the shade. During ' the same month last year the highest point reached was 74 degrees, and the coldest 38 degrees. The German Empire proposes to have new Houses of Parliament, and fifteen English competitors were among the bidding architects at Berlin. But a Gotha artist won the prize — Gilbert Scott and J. Scott, of England, coming in second, Germany exultant. The value of the grand prize of Paris, which was won by the English horse Cremorne on the 9th June, was £6,000. The Burmese Ambassadors, at present in London, have adopted a uniform for their s ervants. White, scarlet, and gold, we are told, are the colours.

George Maule, sharebroker, Grahamstown, has filed a declaration of his inability to meet ni3 engagements with his creditors. An extiaordinary meeting of the shareholder of the Nonpareil G.M.Co. is to be held in the Insurance Buildings on the 27th instant, at 3 o'clock, for the purpose of revising rules, &c.

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THE Daily Southern Cross., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVIII, Issue 4695, 10 September 1872

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3,737

THE Daily Southern Cross. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVIII, Issue 4695, 10 September 1872

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