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ITEMS BY THE SUEZ MAIL.

We continue our extracts from the European Mail, Home Ncxos, and other English journals :—: — Some subscriber in one of the multitude of so-called "comic" prints pours forth a series of doggerel verses of intended satire on the colonial agents who were at Lord Graneille's State dinner. Here is a sample of his poetical lucubration :—: — "New Zealand's agent, too, vrai there, To whom Earl Granville spoke so blandly, He quite forgot the lordiy air, That usually suits him so grandly : Determined to do nuught by halves, Along with »word and tassel line, He'd bought a splendid pair of calves, Which—while he quaff'd his lordship's Time— Ho thaut straight out beneath the table (To pirove himself »t home) As f us ever he was able; Contented with the million loan,— In that soft moment of delight, — I As though the money »ere hh own, i And he to be a peer that night. " The Grand Stand at the Derby was thickly sprinkled with colonists. There might be noticed ex-Governor Sir George Grey, and I on the course were Dr. Featherston and a crowd of folks from Australia and New Zealand too numerous to mention. The melancholy thing about the otherwise happy class of successful returned colonists seems to be that they are restless to a degree to interfere with true enjoyment ; and their desire to be noticed and lionised in ever so small a way exhibits itself oppressively, and bursts ont disagreeably under disappointment. Their wives are infected with the same idiosyncrasy, but have the tact and the good taste to show it less. Probably the circumstance that in many cases they have been little kings or queens in their own colonial spheres has unfitted them for playing what is vulgarly termed " second fiddle " at home. Some amongst them are inclined to show too plainly, also, that they estimate their fellow-beings pretty lmich by the size of their respective money-bags ; and such expressions as "He has £7,000 a year at the very least," "He has made a pretty goodpile," crop up every five minutea in their conversation. As a rule, too, they are i not reading folks. They have ordinarily been too busy with their material interests to bother themselves much with more intellectual matters. But in spite of all, there is an originality about them that is attractive, and, if they are self-satisfied, they are usually very good-humoured What sort of a race will the Australians be a hundred years hence ? Judging from those who at present visit England, if their national characteristics, so to apeak, go on developing, they will have much of the mercurial temperament of the French, possess great sensitiveness, but lesa of robust mental energy than the inhabitants of the mother countiy. —Dr. Foatherstou and Mr. Bell have both been on the Continent, enjoying themselves, lately. — The ltev. Dr. C. J. Abraham has completed his his resignation of the Bishopric of Wellington, and will act henceforth as coadjutor of the Bishop of Lichfield. —Sir George Grey has been uirwell lately, the consequence of a severe cold eauvht at the Derby. He still speaks of returning speedily to New Zealand, but as he has been constantly talking of this ever since he has been here, his friends are not very alarmed at the prospect of losing him just yet. Like many other eminent retired colonial Governors, he doubtless feels painfully the comparative obscurity of his position here. He is obviously not satisfied with the inferior r<Me he is doomed to play at , home, and his ambition restlessly sighs for a ; wmer field of action. Ib is one of the draw- I backs occasionally to a successful career of , the colonial statesman, politician, lawyer, or merchant, that they often leturn to their own country to find that if they expect to enjoy the same consideration here that they have been accustomed to abroad, they are sadly disappointed. They have to ignore the sentiment of aut Caesar aut nullus if they ' would have any peace of mind, and indemnify themselves for their 1 iss of their former importance by the substantial luxuries and enjoyments that their money may purchase them. i j

Books for New Zealand.—The following appeared in Land and Water:—" Sir,—ln your last number of Land and Water a letter appeared from my friend Captain Salvin, seeking assistance in forming a collection of rooks for the above destination. Permit me to offer my most Bincere thanks for the prompt and very kind response that I received, in the shape of a most abundant supply of fine, stiong, and healthy young birds; and I hope, under the care and management of my son, Edward Baitlctt (to whom also 1 beg to refer your correspondent •CM.' for information upon this subject), they may live to reach and prosper in New Zealand, where, from the accounts that reach us, they arc likely to prove of inestimable value/

Paince Charlie's Target.— The Edinburgh Courant tells a circumstantial story about a Highland target which has just been sent home from New Zealand, and which, "on unimpeachable evidence" of course, is stated to have bean the buckler w orn by the ill-fated Prince Charles at the battle of Culloden. The Times published the following letter from "A Coloni&t," on the 16th June :— "There are great openings now, in both islands of New Zealand, for a large scheme of emigration on the pi'inciples of co-opera-tive societies. Three events have tended to bring great tracts of land into the market, which offer ready-made opportunities for carrying on the business of sheep and cattle runs, and commencing agricultural operations on a large scale. These three events are the (Trojan) war of the la«t ten years, the fall in price of wool, and the collapse of the flax trade. I believe that it would be possible just now to purchase a quarter of a million nearly contiguous acres in each island for 7s. Gd. an acre, and to buy the sheep at present running on them for half-a-crown a head or leas. A co-operative society might buy 100,000 contiguous acres, and the sheep upon them, with all the plant and apparatus of sheep stations. The co-operative society should consist—l. Of the younger sons <<f gentry who have some little capital, but no opening in this country for their tastes or gift 3. 2. Of practical sheep and cattle farmers. 3. Of agriculturists. 4. Of mechanics—such as carpenters, brickmakers, bricklayers, wheelwrights, weavers, tailora, aud cobblers. 5. Of shepherds and labourers. 6. Of two or three accountants thoroughly versed in the principles of a co-operative society, and two or , three surveyors. The advantages of this plan would be—l. That the labourers and mechanics, having an interest in the pioperty, would remain on the estate, instead of running off to the goldfields in New Zealand or other colonies, 2. That it would not be necessaiy to pay them in cash the full wage of the colony ; but half of the day's wage should be paid in cash, and the other half put to the men's account as share of the purchase money of the estate. _ 3. The sons of the gentry would learn their business as surveyors, as sheep farmers, as agriculturists, and nwt receive any salary foy their work till declared competent, but only a fair interest for the capital advanced. 4. * body of men living together in one society would consume much of their own produce ; but by the very fact of their having the same local interests they would become a political poiocr in the province, and could obtain from the local or Colonial Governments aid in making roads and bridges, and in supporting schools aud hospitals, and other suoh public advantages that immigrants now lpse by dotting them* selves over the country, and having no joint interests. 5. The religiom bodies in England would probably lend a helping hand to such Bocietiea at their first start, and provide them with clergy and schoolmasters, and means of erecting churches and school-houses, 6. The effect of the above-mentioned advantages , would betoattraefcanumber of well-principl d | mechanics and labourers, who are now loth to leave England because they have to part with all the social and religious privileges they have enjoyed at home, and wnich'they desire to impart to their children ; and many of the aristocracy and gentry of the land would send out younger members of their families iv. company with tenants and farm labourers attached to their several families and parishes. 7. Two or three professional

men could easily be found to accompany such a body of emigrants. 8. But it is to be observed that the more societies, and the greater the number of the members, and the more contiguous to each other the several societies, the greater their political power and means of opening markets, and supplying the population of the goldfields." The Government have at last displayed an unmistakable sign of change in their hitherto hard and fast line of colonial policy. It is not too much to say that the New Zealanders have achieved a triumph in obtaining from the Colonial Secretary 'an j Imperial guarantee of a loan of one million sterling for tlie general purposes of the colony. The fact is that Lord Granville is ; not insensible to the genial influences of a j public opinion which has been created by the j exceptional circumstances in which the j colonists of "New Zealand have been placed. ! The concession has been wrung from the Government by persistent agitation, and, , although it loses some of its gracefulness in ; consequence, it is none the less welcome. ' The colonies have done all this in spite of great discouragement, adverse Imperial legis. lation, the difficulties of organising an entirely new and expensive system of labour, unequal powers of competition with the slave-holding countries, an occasional year or two of bad crops, and low prices for produce; and they deserve full credit for the achievement. !

The Colonies.—Earl Russell has given notice that he will shortly bring forward the following motion on the subject of the colonies in the House of Lords:—" That a humble address be presented to her Majesty, stating that this House has seen with great satisfaction the spontaneous expressions of loyalty and attachment to the British Crown which have lately emanated from many of the colonies. That this House humbly prays her Majesty to appoint a commission to inquire into the means best fitted to guarantee the security of every part of her dominions."

Majesty's Troops in the Colonies. — A Parliamentary return shows the number of effectives of all ranks of the army actually stationed in India and the several colonies and garrisons abroad at the commencement of each of the last ten financial years. In New Zealand there were 1,120 in 1860, above 10,000 in 1864 and 1865, 6,692 in 1866, 2,820 in 1867, 911 in 1868, 797 in 18Gl>. Colonial butter is making its mark in the English market. A parcel from Canterbury, ex 'Hydaspes,' consigned to Mr. Tallerman, is being rapidly parted with by that gentleman, at from lOd. to Is. per lb. The parcel in question is in unusually good condition, and, if it could be followed by others of similar quality, the whole could be placed at good prices. Butter is a very questionable commodity here just now, and anything bearing the impress of the genuine article is eagerly sought after, With butter, as with all oth r colonial products, the great necessity is that it should be well packed, be of good quality, and present as sightly an appearance as possible. A great deal of money is lost through carelessness in this latter particular. The Monarch Insurance Company.— The charge of conspiracy and fraud against six of the directors of this company was, on June 2, for the fifth time heard by the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House. The evidence was chiefly that of persons whose names appeared in the share register of the company as proprietors of various numbers of shares, from 50 to 500, whereas they hod never applied for an allotment, and were mostly in poor circumstances and utterly unable to pay calls. The case was again adjourned. At the final hearing o* this case, on June 14, the Lord Mayor committed all the defendants for trial, but allowed bail—their own recognisances in 12,000, and two sureties m each.— Mail.

£1,000 European Murder of an Entire Family.—On May 24, information reached us from the small village of Denham, about <wo miles from Uxbridge, of an extraordinary and diabolical series of murders. A small cottage in this place was occupied by an engineer, named Marshall, and his family. The man was busy at work in his workshop lateen May 21. Nothing, however, having been seen of the family next day, or even on the day following, two men, who had some work to do in the house, forced open the door, when a ghastly sipjht met their gaze. Three children, with nothing on but their nightgowns, and covered over with a cloth, were lying huddled up in a corner, covered with blood, their brains having been dashed out apparently by a sledge-hammer which was found near the spot. In the next room were discovered the bodies of two women in their night-dress, similarly treated—one of thorn being the wife, and the other her sister, who was to have been married on May 23. On proceeding to the workshop Marshall himself was found, in his working dress, with his head and face slashed and cut about in a fearful manner, and covered over with sacking. It was at first supposed that he had killed the family, and afterwards committed suicide ; but on the arrival of Drs. Ferris and Macnamara they pronounced it to be impossible for him to have done it, from the position in which he was found ; and they are of opinion, moreover, that one man could not have committed so many murders without some assistance. But from the evidence adduced at the coroner's inquest there seems little doubt that the murderer has been captured. Frightful Collision,—A dreadful collision occurred a few days since on the Baden Railway. A mixed passenger train from Constanoe entered the station at Murg in the afternoon. An engine and tender from Waldshut, and proceeding to Bale, followed at some distance. When the passenger train had entered the Murg station the usual danger signals were set, but the driver of the engine which followed had been drinking, and, neglecting to observe the signals, ran into the station, where the locomotive dashed into the rear of the stationary train, and a fearful hcene of suffering and death was at once produced. Three carriages filled with passengers were comp etely crushed, the last one being forced into that before it. When the smoke and dust caused by the collision had cleared off, it waa found that nearly sijety passengers were more or )ess buried under the wreck of the carriages. The wounded, nearly thirty in number, were attended by surgeons summoned by telegraph from the nearest towns. The townspeople were so furious at the criminal misconduct of the engine-driver, that it was with difficulty they were restrained from enforcing Lynch-law. A shocking tragedy, the result of drunkenness, has just taken place in the Isle of Man. A young Englishman named Williams, was at Mona Hotel, Douglas, and, when in a state of setni-intoxication, drew a revolver, and, by way of jest, aimed a bullet at the landlord's hat. His marksmanship was bad, and the unfortunate man was killed on the spot, Williams, seeing what he had done, went to his lodgings and blew out his brains with a shot from the same revolver. The following letter, written by Mr. Goldwin Smith.in connection with "Lothair," has been addressed to Mr. Disraeli :—" Cornell University, Ithaca, State of New York, May 25, 1870.—Sir,—In your ' Lothair ' you introduce an Oxford professor who is about to emigrate to America; and you describe him as a 'social parasite.' You well know that, if you had ventured openly to accuse me of any social baseness, you would have had to answer for your words, But when, 'sheltering yourself under the literary forms of a work of fiction, you seek to traduce with impunity the social character of a political opponent, your aspirations can touch no man's honour ; they are the ating , less insults of a coward.—Your obedient servant, Goldwin Smith. The Right Hon. B. Disraeli, M.P." ,

Extensive Fire in Glasgow.— A fire broke out on June 4, at the factory ofMessrs. Young, Strang, and Co., muslin manufacturers, Bridgton, Glasgow, after all hands had left the works. The large mill, the warehouse, and its contents were entirely destroyed, and nothing was saved but the weaving engine and boiler shed. The damage is estimated at £20,000 to £30,000. A curious sect, calling themselves "Jehovah's Band," bave arisen in New Jersey. Their peculiar form of worship, a » local paper states, develops itself by

blowing, whistling, shouting, jumping, wrestling, falling to the floor, and rolling over and kicking. Both men and women engage in the exercises. New members are baptised at midnight in the village millpond. On the Sabbath they hold continuous service.

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Bibliographic details

ITEMS BY THE SUEZ MAIL., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVI, Issue 4052, 17 August 1870

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2,874

ITEMS BY THE SUEZ MAIL. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVI, Issue 4052, 17 August 1870

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