Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

PORT OF ONEHUNGA.

Arrival-,. — May 3. Phoube, s.s., Worsp. from .-outhern ports. Passeugeis : Mr. and Mrs. Eees and six children, Mr. and Mrs. Melhuish, Mr. and Mrs. West, Mr. Wilson, Mrs. MeRae and iniant, Mrs. Whitred and two children, Mrs. and Master Kissling, Miss Abraham, Miss Crispe, Rev. Mr. Jackson, Rev. Mr. Sleig, E. L. Bucholz, Mr. and Mrs. Fmdlay and four children, Mr, Hepworfch and man servant ; Messrs. E. L Bucbol/, F. G. Moore, W. H. Kksliiig, Smith, Gilles, Harvey, Meyer, Robinson, Hogan, Carey, Beattie, Punmordie, Ro«s, G. Bassed, C. Ware, T. W. Digby, A. and W. McWilliam, J. and L. Galloway, D. Cainuchael, J. Thomson, F. McDonald, Peterstill, George, Simpson, Macarey.— Henderson and Macfarlane, agents. Cleared Outwards— May 3. Stormbird, 08 tons, Doile, for Southern ports. Passengers— Messrs. Pmith, Nicholas, Campbell, Stevenson, Ross, Talbot, Taylor, Barnett, Williams, Roberts, Harcomt. — Combes and Daldy, agents. Keera, s.s., 158 tons, Bain, for Whanganui. — <T, S. Maofarlane, agent. ) ]*3xpofiTS. — May 3. Per s.s. Keera. for Whanganui : Free and duty-paid goods — 3 packages sashes, 9 doors, 38 pieces architraves, Union Steam Sash and Door Company ; 1 case drapery, 1 bale drapery, 1 case drapery, 1 truss, 1 case 1 truss, 1 case. Pe^ s.s. Stormbird, for Southern ports: For Taranaki, duty-paid and free— 24 wheelbarrows, 1 cask rosin, 1 case drapery, 5 cases drapery, 7 trunks bootw, 40 packages ironmongery, 1<V Whangauui— -300 di am tiles, 10 cases drapeiy, 10 lugs gi\T^ soed, 3 cases ftirnituie, I oa&e, 10 ti unks boots, 1 cage machinery, 1 case ironmongery, 3 packages drapery.

ARRIVAL OP THE PHCEBR. The Circular Saw Company's^, s. Phcobe, Oaptain H. Worsp, arrived in the Manukau yesterday morning fiom Southern ports. She brings a general cargo and a large number of passengers. Captain Worsp reports having left the Bluff on the 27th April at 4.30 p.m. ; arrived at Port Chalmers on the following morning at 8 ; sailed in the afternoon at 4.38 ; arrived off LyttelLon at 1 p.m. on the 29fch ; sailed again at 2.30 p m,, arriving m Wellington on the 30th at 10 a.m. ; sailed for Picton on the 1st May at 3 a.m., reaching there at S a.m., and leaving again at 9 a.m. same morning, getting to Nelson at 6 p.m. in the evening ; entered the harbour at 8.30 p.m., and left again same tide for ISTew Plymouth ; arrived off the town on the 2nd at 10 a.m. ; remained at anchor discharging and receiving cargo till 6.30 p.m. ; off Manukau Heads at 6 a.m. on the 3id, entered at 8 a.m., reaching the wharf as above. To Nelson experienced a succession oT fine weather throughout the passage ; thence to Taranaki, moderate westei-ly winds, with a heavy sea crossing the Strait ; to the Manukau, light variable winds with fine weather. We are indebted to Mr. Wheeler, purser, for our files of Southern papers.

GREAT PERIL OF THE OABNAQUHEEN. The Darra is not the only one of our wool ships that has narrowly escaped destruction, as will be seen by the following extract from a letter by Mr. Clisby, late of Pamdle-street : — " The other day I went on board the Carnaquheen (from Adelaide last October). Such a sight met iny view I never wish to see again. It appears that, having no passengers, and wishing to make a quick passage, so as to be the first for the February wool sales, the captain decided to go by way of Cape Horn. One morning, while off the Cape, the ship was struck by a tremendous head sea, that forced in the whole of the front of the saloon, carried away the whole of the state rooms and fittings, and entirely destroyed everything. The looking-^lass that oi'namented the mast is entirely stripped off, and the maat left quite bare. The wineglasses, swing- fcrays, &c, were forced by the rush of air through the skylight. The captain (who was in his cabin at the time) was forcibly propelled by the vast volume of I water to the end of the saloon, and only saved his life by catching hold of the brass rail that sustained the swing trays, &c, and which was broken by his endeavours to save his life. The cabin table, seats, and sleep-ing-bertha are entirely destroyed, and so complete is the wreck that none of the occupants of the saloon slept in a, bed for nine days. The captain's gold watch was. washed away' through the after cabin windows, which being forced out no doubt saved the •tern of the ship from being forced out. Two of the ship's boats were emasbed to pieces, and a portion of the bulwark* curried away, A day o» two before this nooident ft \ boy was lost overboard. I understand £1,000 will not cover the cost of repairs. "~ i South Australian Advertiser, April 13.

Wheok .of the Steamer Persevprance. —The Sydney Morning Herald of the 26th *ajrs(: — " The paddle-wheel steamer Perseverance, a;b v one time engagedLupon the Parramatta Kiver, ,'jmcl which was subsequently bouofht'for the purpose of running between tkeTjveeclRiver and t Brisbane, has, we'learn by t rfegratn^Been w*e'clced on the bar atftho entrance to"t%T%e^dr h^ndf^ere TSay^dv^^ f-%£x^^ ? « r fyfa$Vfzil* f i;m^M"; ' ' |

The bavge Kuluine, belonging to the steamer Moolgewanke, with 480 bales of wool on board, was snagged and sunk in the Darling, near Wilcannia. On account of the state of the river, there being about 50 feet of water at present, it is feared none of the cargo can be removed. Most of the | wool is insured in Melbourne, but thirtynine bales are insured here in the National at £12 per bale, amounting in all to £468. — South Australian Advertiser, April 9. The Miantonomoh. — The terrible force with which a blow can be dealt by a doubleturreted_ Monitor wag shown by the Mianotonomoh in the sinking of the Maria on the night of the 3rd instant, while en route to Boston. She was steaming at the rate of seven miles an hour, when she ran into the steamer Maria off Cape Cod. The Miantonomoh struck the Maria about midships, pressed her bow completely through the side, , forced the engines out through the other side, and lifted the -wooden steamer up on her bow like a broken egg-shell. The steamer remained a few minutes on the bow of the Mianotonomoh, and was carried with the greatest ease. Soon it Was shaken off, filled with water, and sunk immediately. Four lives were lost. It is calculated that the monitors Mianotonomoh and Terror, now at Boston, have animpetus, when under a speed of seven knots, equal to about 60,000 tons, — New York Herald. Wreck of the Flying Cloud. — Particulars of this wreck have been furnished by the Port Macdonald correspondent of the Mount Gambler Standard : — " Fifteen minutes p.m. the ship struck heavily forward, knocking away a portion of the forefoot. The weather still continued very thick, with sea remai-kably smooth, ship going about two and a half knots. Immediately hove back and wore the ship round on her heel. Found three fathoms amidships ; filled and turned sails on the port tack ; sounded the pumps and found the ship making no water ; breakers seen on the starboard bow. The ship immediately struck heavily under the stern, uplifting the rudder, and starting the sternpost ; ship repeatedly striking heavily on her bilge. Sounded the pumps, and found three feet of water in her, and that there was no hope of getting the ship off again. Cleared away and launched the boats, hung to the stern, and put a supply of provisions in them. Got the captain's wife and child and crew into the boats, the captain and mate remaining on the wreck until 2 p.m., when they found ten feet of water m the hold. Then the captain aud iuu,le got into the boat, and hung by the wreck until 3 p.m., weather still remaining thick ; then let go from the wreck, the vessel starting to break up, and pulled towards the direction of the land ; brought the boats through several rocks awash. Weather clearing up a little, discerned a headland, which appeared to be an island, likewise a small sandy bay leading towards it. Landed all safe, and discharged what was in the boats. Weather clearingup a little, and sea continuing smooth, again proceeded to the wreck, and found the ship on a ridge of low rocks, about 800 yards from the headland, and in latitude 37 "56 S., and longitude 140 '25 E. Then proceeded to recover as much as possible from the wreck. " We clip the following from the Wayrnambool Advertiser, April 20 : — " On Tuesday a large piece of wreck, about thirty feet in length, drifted into Portland Bay, and was dragged up by the boatmen. It is now lying on the beach on the south side, near the old jetty. The wreck is the monkey deck, supposed, of the sugar ship Flying Cloud, that recently went to pieces near Cape Northumberland There is no name or indication on the wreck to indicate that it is part of the Flying Cloud ; but the set of the current and the state of the weather for some days past render the surmise probable. The width tapers from twenty-one feet to twelve feet. Two Avhite skylights, with blue borders, form part of the wreck. "

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18700504.2.5.2

Bibliographic details

PORT OF ONEHUNGA., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVI, Issue 3962, 4 May 1870

Word Count
1,547

PORT OF ONEHUNGA. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVI, Issue 3962, 4 May 1870

Working