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PORT OF AUCKLAND.

ARRIVALS. Jtoy*l Alfred, p.i., 180 ton*, Jfarquhar, from tho Thainei, with passengers* John Porm, ».s., 122 tons, Carey, from th« Thame*, with passengers. Dnke of «.diaburgh,p.B.,[sl tons, H. M»rki. firomtht Thames, with pwtengers. Enterprise No. 2, p b., 45 tons, Scon, from Sliortland, with passengers. Mary Smith, schooner, 99 tons, Watson, from Tahiti. Marjr, *ohooner, 22 ton», Hogan, from w aiheke. Beien, schooner, 23 tons, Been, from K»w»u. Cornstalk, cutter, from the Thames, in ballast. Orpheus, cutter, 21 tons, Crbsi, from Ifawau, with firewood. Tay, cutter, 16 tons, Sullivan, from Hot Springs.

ENTERED INWAUDS. Wellington, 8.5., 262 tons, Holmes, from Sapier and Southern ports. Portland, ship, 872 tons, Coster, from London, Mary, schooner, 22 tons, flogan, from Waiheke, with 12,000 rails. Tay, cutter, 16 ton*, Sullivan, from Hot Springs, TTitli 10,000 shingles, 18 tons firewood.

CLEABEP OUTWARDS. #o-ahead, s.s., 70 tons, Mundle, for Russell, with sundries. Mary, schooner, 22 tons, Hoc»n, for Waihelw. T&y, cutter, 16 tons, Sullivan, for Hot Springs, with sundries.

DEPARTURES. Royal Alfred, p.s., 130 tons, Farquhar, for the Thames, with tjsssengers. John Perm, s s., 122 tons, Carey, for the Thames, lvitli passengers. Lalla Kookli, p.«., Adami, for tli« Thamei, with passengers. Go-ahead, s.s., 70 tons, Mundle, for Eussell, with suadries. Mary, schooner, 22 tons, Hogan, for Waiheke. Kay, cttttor, io tons, Sullivan, for tht Hot Springs.

VESSELS EXPECTED. H.M. a. Galatea, from England. H.M. i. Roiario, from Bydney. ' H.M. i.i. Blanoha from East Coast. H M. s. Challenger, from th» South. Mary Shepherd, ship, from London. Undaunted, ship, from London. Icon, ship, from London. Lancastria, ship, Loryman, from Liverpool (l«ftiing) Kate Waters, barque, from London (loading). Novelty, barqu«, from San Franclico. Oollingvrood, bar-iue, from Chatham Islands. Au Revoir, brigantine, from Tahiti. Eugonie, schooner, from Tahiti' Hannah Ntwton, schooner, from Melbourne. Christiana Thompson, from Melbourne. Scotia, schooner, from Melbourne Dunedin, ichooner, from Duoedin. Annie Brown, brigantine, from LytteltOn. Isabella, schooner, from Lyttelton.

VESSELS IN HARBOUB. Thii lial does not include coasting cutter?,) Lord Ashley, g.8., from the South. Wellington ».s. from Southern Fort;. Go-ahead, s *„ from Russell. Knterpru* No, 1, p.s. (on ferry »»rric«). Enterprise No. 2, p.i. (en Thames trade), bake of Edinburgh, p.s. (on Thames trade). Lady Bowen, p.g. (repairing). Lalla Kookh, p s. (on Thames trade). Royal Alfred, p.». (on Thames trade). John Perm, q s. (on Thames trade). Favourite, p.i. Gemini, 1.1. (on Klverhead ferry lervico). J*ne, 1 1. (repairing). Percy, ship, from London, Maori, ship, from London. Portland, ship, from London. Kate, barque, from Sydney. Moaroa, barque, from Tahiti. Ethels, barque, from Adelaide. Princess Alice, brig, from Mauritius. FawH, brig, fiom Lyttelton, £feva, schooner, from Tahiti. Mary Smith, schooner, from Tahiti. Peri, icliooner, from Korotonga. Se* Breeze, schooner, fiom Rorotonga, Southern Cross, schooner, from Norfolk Island. Zephyr, schooner, from Norfolk Island. Tavrera, schooner, from Poverty Bay, Fortune, sehoonet, from East Coast. Clyde, schooner, from East Coast, Mary Thompson, schooner, from Kaiparn. Mariner, schooner, from Kaipara. Kenilworth, schooner, from Meicury Bay. Ivanhoe, schooner, from Mangonui. Leonidas, schooner, from Kusscll.

ARRIVAL OF THE SCHOONER MARY smith from Tahiti. The Bchooner Mary Smith arrived in harbour yesterday evening, having made » fair run from Tahiti. She left Sydney for the South Sea Islands on the 256h of January ; experienced light variable winds. On the 10th of February, at half-past 11 in the morning, two very severe shocks of submarine earthquake were felt : this was in 36*53 S, latitude, and 168 28 W. longitude. The Mary Smith took in 80,000 oranges at Tahiti, and sailed, with Sydney cargo, on the 12th instant. Heavy rain nnd variable winds were met duriDg the voyage. On Monday night arrived off the Great Barrier and encountered a strong gale from the N.E. Mr, L. D. Nathan is a passenger by the M»ry Smith. Cargo: From Sydney— 9 half-tierces tobacco, 13 chests congou tea, 40 boxes candles, 5 caseß pickles, 6 cases Scotch jams, 4 casks English vinegar, 1 case sardines, 2 cases lobsters, lease English confectionery, 4 cases starch, 1 cask currants, 4 hhds. coarse salt, 1 hhd. fine salt, 80 cases kerosine, 1 case salad oil, 9 hhdp. cabin biscuit, 60 bags rice, 1 case tin coffee, 2 oaaes sauces, 2 cases mustard, 2 cases pipes, 7 cases sultana raiains, 2 cases medicines, 2 cases vegetables, 40 bas;s ilour, 4 cases cutlery, 1 case stationery, 1 case fish, hooks and lines, 4 trunks boots and shoei, 1 case sadlery, 2 packages ironmongery, 9 kegs wire nails, 1 case cigars, 7 packages kerosine lamps and glasses, 2 cases toys, 1 case rocking chain, SO tons coals, 2 crates crockery, 1 case eng'avings, 10 packages galvanised buckets and tubs, 2 cases tinware, 5 packages drapery, From Tahiti— 80,000 oranges.— L. D. Nathan, agent.

The f.s. Airedale had not arrived in the Manukau last evening at dusk. The s,s. Go-ahead left for Ruaaell yesterday afternoon. The Au Revoir cleared out from Tahiti the same day as the Mary Smith. The Eugenie was being loaded ■with cotton at Tahiti on the 12th instant; and would leave for this port at the end of the month. The cutter Wangarei will leave for Whangarei by this morning's tide. A Russian transport, the Winged Arrow, oalled into Tahiti for water while the Mary Smith was there. She had on board about 300 passengers. The steamer Tauranga arrived in harbour from the the Bay of Islands yesterday evening. She called at Whangarei coming down, and left again at 9 o'clock on Monday morning. The following passengers arrived by the T»uranga: —His Honor the Superintendent, Mrs. Williamson, Mies Williamson, Mrs. Young, Mrs. Day, Messrs. O'Neill, Mitchell, Tole, Young, Luok, Clark, Day, Mr. Calligan and son, Captain French, Captain Wright, Mr. Brown, Mr. Byrne, TautarJ, and 3 other natives. We have seen a telegram from Wellington, dated the 24th, announcing the arrival there oMhe ship ' Moss Trooper,' 120 days out. A correspondent, signing himself "J.L.," states that a few days ago there was a bet made on board of the Perm by two gentlemen, of £15 to £5, that the Alfred would be in Shortlaud before the Perm, and the Perm won by twenty minutes. From Shortland to Auckland, both steamers started together from Graham's Town Wharf at 10 minutes past 5. The Royal Alfred soon took the lead, both steamers carrying on all sail they could set to suit. At half* past six the Alfred was about half a mile a-head of the Perm; the «ea got up a little, and the Perm began to crawl slowly upon, the .Alfred. About half-past seven o'clock the Perm was alongside the Alfred; when the p&esenuers on both boats began to cheer, some using abusive language. They kept in company with each other till they arrived at the the Sandspit, where the water was smooth; then the Alfred got away slowly. There were several bets on the race, one gentleman betting £10 to £1 on the Alfred, which was taken up. The Alfred came in a winner by five minutes. The Eoyal Alfred made her passage in four hours 17 minutes; the John Perm in four hours and 23 minutes. The Gustav Adolf arrived at Newcastle from Aucklan lon April 5. The Midnight and Fawn left Lyttelton for this port on the 12th instant. The ketch Isabella arrived in Lyttelton on April 14 from Kaipara, 35 days out. The barque Isabella arrived at balf-pxst 10 o'clock on the 30th ultimo in the harbour at Hobarfe To»n, and in the afternoon landed alongside the Franklin wharf. She left Mangonui, N.Z., on the 14th ultimo, and had fine weather throughout the passage, with variable winds from E.N.E, and E.S.B. She was loaded with 90,000.feet of kauri pine, to the order of Captain Fisher. The Australasian Packet, barque, 196 tons, E. J. Ledwill, from Whangaroa (near Auckland), arrived at Hobarb Town on April 2, with a full cargo of kauri pina and spars.—Agent, Captain Gourlay.

I ARRIVAL OF THE GKEAT BRITAIN AT \ MELBOURNE. This renowned old steamship, the arrival of which has been watohed and waited for during the last four or five days, waa telegraphed on Thnrsday, April 8, as having passed Cape Otway at nine o'olock in the morning. The information at once gare rise to a feeling of intense satisfaction, and quite justified the ♦pinioa expressed by those who know the Britain

and her commander well, that she would, bar accident, turn up before the sixty-fourth day out. The Heads were entered atfourp. m. t and »bout eight p.m. Bha anohored off Gellibrand's Point. On ne«r.ng the light-sbip she fired two guns, and immediately after, the ship, like " a oartle of the deep" m she a, and showing quite an array of light* from her cabins, o«ne majestically up. For a long series of year* this veteran steamer haa serred the public faithfully and v well, and her career, in ao far as the voyages to this port are concerned, has been an unf^ifieda^a,mo« •egiviuiate uuooeaSi So distinguished^* feature indeed in rhe history of this grand old ihiphas-thejel inability of her arrival at anticipated" dates" redouWthaYner appearance In port has hitherto .been^calculated on. wi n iiimoot xha precision of a railway* frail'. Onher present voyage, however, the Greaj; Britain has had to steam a great; part of the way, ar/djtji&t', too, undrt m ordinary disadvantage, the winds being- dead agiiofit her. By reason of these contrary winds, and the consequent consumption of coal, the steamer had to put into St. Vincent's to replenish her stock of fuel, thus adding t > the duration of tho" voyage. Notwithstanding, however, , the few days 1 longer extent of the voyage, <the Great Britain haa brought fuller details of English intelligence up, to date February 3. , Tne ninny thousands of passengers of all 1 disced who ' have voyaged in this ship, and are resident in the. , colony, will regret to know tbathef gallant com-" mander, Captain John Gray, has for a fortnight before , entering port been suffering from a severe attack of jaundice. It is hoped, however, that a week or two's residence on shore will rehabilitate his 'constitution, and see him once more himself again. The Key. Mr. Flavell, associate »f King's College, London, is a ! patfsenger by her, and proceeds to a sphere of labour in Nelson. On the voyage ont, and indeed not many days before reaching port, one. of. the naloon passengers, Mr. Robert Lawsb'n, jumped overßdard, and was drowned. The circumstance happened on Saturday, the 3rd mat. Mr; Lawaori waVatf' Old 6ol6nist, and one of the earliest principal* of the Scotch College, Eastern Hill. In a fit of temporary inianity,he threw himself overboard from the quarter-deck. The ship was then going at the rate of nine to ten knots an hour under oanvus, and with a lights fair. wind,. Mr. Lawaon rose to the surface, a few yards from the stern of the ship, and a life-buoy was thrown to him He '■ did not appear to see it; but the immersion seemed to luve restored him to a senie of his danger, and, being a good swimmer; he at once turned on his baok apparently to float till help fehould refcch him. No attempt, howerer, was made to save him. It is Stated that the third officer ordered » boat to be Cleared and lowered, but that the firat officer, Mr. . Ch»pmau (in command in coniequeHc'eof the illness of Captain Gray), countermanded the order,declining to take any measures to save a man who " had thrown himself overboard." A grave charge of inhumanity in involved in this matter, and it will be well if a satisfactory explanation can be given by Mr Chapman. — Abridged from the Argus. ■

Weather— K*iny. Wind— N.E.

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PORT OF AUCKLAND. Unknown, Volume XXV, Issue 3674, 28 April 1869

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