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NORTHERN DIVISION ELECTIONS.

Qn Saturday, the polls wer.e declared for the elections in the Northern Division for the House of Representatives and the Provincial Council. There was but a small attendance at the Pilot-station, where the declaration took place. , Tbe t?ktubnino (Colonel Balneavis) said he would declare the numbers in the election f< r the Provincial Council first. For Henry D»cre the votes .. were 227, and for George Stain es 40. He had therefore to declare Henry Dacre elected as member of tbe Provincial Council for tbe Northern Division. TheFETTraNir>G Offickk then declared the votes in the election for a member for tbe House of T?epre« aentatives to be : — For Thomas Macfarlane, 234 ; for Isaac Rhodes Cooper, 133. He bad to declare Thomas Macfarlane duly elected as the member of tiie House of Representatives for the Northern Division. : Mr. Dacre, the successful candidate for the Pro* vincial Council, was not present, and Captain Cooper, who bad- proposed him, wished to return jjhanks on his behalf, but tbe Returning Officer did hot consider himself warranted in allowing that to be done. Mr. Staihes said that, on the last occasion he met the electors and non-electors there, he had the show of hands in his favour. That seemed to be customary for the defeated candidate, and therefore he had not felt encouraged on that account that he would be returned. He had come there to return thanks according to bis promise, and he would have considered himself bound to do so if he bad got bull one vote. But be had had 40 votes recorded for him. As Mr. Dacre bad been twelve years resident in the country, and bis father in the city of Auckland engaged in business, while he (Mr. Staines) had been only five years here, he did not feel marred by the decision. (Hear.) He had not heard that anything had been said of himself throughout the election that was derogatory to him. Mr. Dncre was an old settler, and knew the country better than he, and perhaps the decision come to was the wisest. Mr. Dacre was now returned, and he should esteem him his representative an well as the representative of those who bad voted for him. He hoped he would serve tbe division, and tbe country generally, in such a manner as to give satisfaction. He (Mr. Staines) felt grateful to the officers for the way in which tbe election had been conducted. As to the contest, it had been put throughout as a matter between town and country, and it was thought that the interests of tbe division would be better served by a resident in the country than a resident in town. But he thought it had been found that those residing in town, as a rule, attended the Council better than country members, and there were many questions, com* mercial and political, which thoie from town under? stood better than those from tbe country. . They had been engaged in commercial affairs while those in. the country were at the plough. In conclusion, he would *gain thank those who had voted for him, and be bad no doubt that those who had voted against him thought that they would serve the country best by returning a candidate resident amongst them. (Hear.) Mr. Macfarlane then came forward to return thanks for having been elected as a member of the House of Representatives. He said that he found he now stood in the position of being one of the representatives of the Northern Division, and it would not manifest proper feeling if he did not feel gratified at the result. He was gratified, and be hoped that be would conduct himself in that position in such a way as would merit their confidence. He thanked all the elect*—" kindly for the way in which the election *-** neen earned on. . . Captain CooPßßsaid that oW^ugb, in the present instance, he war not at the head of the poll, he could not look upon the election as anything bnt a victory. When he considered tbe short notice that had been given to the country settlers, he thought they deserved his cordial thanks for having so well supported him. He knew that bis support would be chiefly in the country ; and when only one week's notice was given, he looked upon it as a compliment that such a number of vote's had been given for him. That short notice was not the fault of the Returning Officer, but the writs ought to have been received sooner, so as to allow of more time before they were returnable. He believed that that election might be looked upon as having been between town and omntry, and it clearly showed that the districts were not fairly divided. In every part of the Northern Division, except one, he had received a majority of votes; from the town he had scarcely received one vote. Very few from the town had voted for him, and, chiefly those connected with the country ; he. might say he had not received any votes from thai town of Auckland. There had been a feeling in the Northern Division that the interests of the settlers were not attended to by tbe town members, and that these gentlemen represented tbe town more than the country. The electors for Franklvn, Raglan, and the Northern Division were chiefly ruled by combinations in Queen-street. (Hear.) From that be believed that the town as well as tbe country bad suffered. No man who was not a constant resident could know the wants of the neglected out-dietrictf. Those who compared their position with that of other provinces know how unjustly the out-districts here had been treated by those who had represented them as a body. Even in the ordinary revenue of the colony they bad been deprived of their rights, and their proper share of money borrowed had not been expended upon them. That had been the case hitherto in that province. In the province of Wellington it had been different, where money bad been devoted to roads. Now the town was feeling the consequence, as capital had been prevented from coming into tbe country, and settlers who had come on the faith of the Provincial Government were unable to occupy their land. He hoped the gentleman now elected would more fairly represent them than they had hitherto been. If so, no one would more warmly congratulate them and support him. He hoped that Mr. Macfarlane would endeavour to < get the money now devoted to the officers of. the General Government to be expended in the country. In that case, he (Captain Cooper) would be the first to congratulate them, and to assist Mr. Maofarlane on future occasions at elections. Mr: Macfarlane had a stake in the Northern Division, bnt bad residpd chiefly in town, and they were afraid was not sufficiently impressed with the necessity of doing; something for the country districts. Captain Cooper then spoke of the present system of election, which he thought faulty, and by which the country settlers did not get justice, so little time being allowed in which to arrange matters. One thing also required alteration — the law by which a country settler was compelled to go to tbe poll . Men in town 'could easily come over to tbe Flagstaff and vote. He hoped a new arrangement would be made, and a system of voting papers carried out, as was done at Oxford and Cambridge. These papers could be sent to the voters, and then each elector would sign his name, and return the paper to the Returning Officer. By that plan a great deal of personation would be avoided, and expense would be saved both to the Government and the candidates. He might tay again that he considered himself under a great compliment to those who had supported him, as be bad not canvassed » single vote, and had never been out of town from the day on which it was known that an election was to take place. ,Mr. Staines proposed a vote of thanks to the ,ihe Returning Officer, and said that, being the defeated candidate, he could do it with good grace. He believed it was evident, from the returns from th« country districts, that the election bad been conducted with more purity than any previous one. He himself, though only a humble tradesman and • "new ohum," had been treated with every reapect ; therefore he returned thanks to the Returning Officer, and would ask them to do the same. Captain Cooper seconded the motion, which was carried. Th,e Returning' Officer acknowledged the tfom- ■ pliment, saying that he was glad that what he had done, bad met with approval. 'The proceedings then terminated. ' ' '

The French meronantship 'Ferdinand de'tEefteps' arrived at Tahiti on the 2nd of April, from Noumea, the chief seaport tow&' of New Caledonia, having made that place from Bordeaux;' fo France, on thf ?3rd of January last, < , ■ \, ■ • < » ,\

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Bibliographic details

NORTHERN DIVISION ELECTIONS., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXIII, Issue 3112, 8 July 1867

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NORTHERN DIVISION ELECTIONS. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXIII, Issue 3112, 8 July 1867

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