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PARIS. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) February 26.

The first day's discussion at the Senate about the address to the Emperor almost assumed the oharacter of a political carnival, thanks to the extravagant speech made by the Marquis de Boissy, who every year plays the part of V enfant terrible in the Senate. Last year he amused himself bv striving to prove that the situation of France would be terrible whenever the Emperor was snatched away by death. This year, he declares that unless the Emperor restores the Parliamentary system of Government to France, the Crown will not be transmitted from father to son in the Imperial family. The history of the last 60 years sufficiently proves the contrary: but no matter, the Parliamentary system has many supporters, who daily increase, from a not unimportant opposition. It is this very party which the Emperor, as it were, attacks in his opening speech. Therefore there is great astonishment and murmurs amongst the venerable senators when the very first speech pronounced, directly aims at defending the parliamentary system. But the original marquis, who has gained for himself the nickname of Criboulet (the celebrated fool of Francis the first,) adroitly changed the subject, and made a long and thoroughly original speech, in which he may be said to attack everybody and everything — Abd-el-kader, Agriculture, the Roman question, Mexico, England, Fenianism, all and each were honored by his remarks ; England in particular exciting his wrath. He desired it should be crushed, exterminated from the face of the earth! The marquis finally made an attack on prince Napoleon, on account of a speech made by the latter at Ajaccio ; and ourious enough, the senate this time did not interrupt M. de Boissy. The following day, however, in order to avoid the scandal which i would have been caused had Prince Napoleon personally replied to the speech of M. de Boissy, the Emperor ordered the Minister of State to defend him in the name of the Government. Prince Napoleon was at first anxious to reply himself to the Marquis's attacks, but gave up doing so, after a .long conversation with the Emperor. # You will perhaps imagine that the affair has been a good deal canvassed and commented on by the French press. If you do, you are greatly mistaken, for I can only give you an account of the silence kept by the newspapers on the matter. The press had been warned by a note published in the Mbniteur, that it must abstain from publishing any comments on the debates in the Chambers. The first impulse on the part of the papers was to set the order of the Government at defiance, but the example made of the JPresse, which received two warnings from the Govern aaenfc in the short space of a fortnight, caused the papers to arrive at the conclusion that prudence was the better part of valour, and so the taciturn party gained the day, and the press may be said now to make a silent couspiration against the Government. The formal declaration in favor of the temporal power by M. Rouher, Minister of State, during the discussion of the paragraph relating to the Roman question, will no doubt be heard with great satisfaction by the Catholics. M. Rouher, though making certain reserves, as to the use that France could make of her liberty of action, in case of a revolution at .Rome, after the departure of the French troops, distinctly declared that the words made use of by the Emperor in his speech, referred to the temporal power. It is true this declaration does not satisfy the Ultramontone party, which would wish to see the provinces, seized by Piedmont in 1860, restored to the Pope; but all reasonable oataolics ought to be content with the assurance that the Imperial Government will watch over the Holy Father, and has the true interest of the Papacy at heart. The paragraph relating to Mexico was voted by the Senate without being discussed. It seems that the Government reserves all explications on this important question until the address is debated on, in the Corps Legislatif. The Spanish Hvre rouge, or collection of diplomatical documents, which has been communicated to the Cortes, runs a good chance of bringing about a rupture between the Courts of Florence and Madrid, owing to the publication of certain despatches of the Spanish Ambassador at Paris, from which it appears that he has sought to obtain guarantees from our minister of foreign affairs in favor of the Holy See, This apparent want of confidence in the good faith of Italy has greatly irritated the Court of Florence, and General La Marmora has written a sharp letter to Madrid, reminding / the Spanish Government that it has no right to interfere, and that her line of conduct calls in question the competency of the cabinets of Pans and Florence. It is difficult to see how the affair will end.

A parliamentary debate, "a la Prussienne," seems nowadays to mean all that can be undignified and outrageous, in the language used by the members of the Prussian Chamber. The debate given rise to by the decree of the Supreme Court at Berlin, declaring the responsibility of deputies for their speeches, appears to have been a most disgraceful affair. M. de Bismark even went so far in his epithets as to compare the deputies to servants who according to Prussian law expose themselves to all sorts of penalties when they offend their master. This violence serves only to widen the breach between the representatives and the Minister. , It not being considered good taste for the grand monde to amuse itself the same days that the mass of the people are doing so, there were no official * receptions on Shrove Tuesday. General Fleury, however, gave a grand dinner party, which was followed by a concert, where Theresa, the diva of the cafe concerts, sang her most popular songs. Then comes the carnival of the streets, which has been as noisy and as stupid as usual. I must, however, render full justice to the organisation of the procession of the boeuf gras, which was much better got up this year than before. The gargons bouchers (butcher boys) were dressed as Druids. An allegorical car, in the form of a large ship, represented the city of Paris ; and lastly, there was Gargantua, a monstrous giant, who swallowed unceasingly all kinds of food, which were supplied .him by a band of small boys dressed as cooks. The procession of the boeuf gras paraded the streets of Paris on Sunday .Monday , and Tuesday, and visited the residences of the high official personages. On Monday, as is the custom, the procession of the Bceuf Gras visited the Tuileries to pay homage to the Emperor. The poor beast, doomed, like the ancient gladiators, to die, may be said in its language to have hailed .Napoleon, as Cse3ar of old, with the words, " Ave, Ceesar, moriturus te salutat, after which it continued its triumphal march. The Bceuf Gras this year was a magnificent animal, and weighed 1,360 kilogrammes. The carnival is now over, and I must say I am heartily glad of it. One gets tired of the continual uproar : the blowing of horns, the yelling and crying which goes on from morning to night, deatens, and almost drives us out of our senses. And the masquerade, you will ask ? Well, that exists also : the men disguise themselves as women, and the women as men, and parade about the town. Masks are not allowed to be worn in the streets, but there are plenty of masks at the opera and other balls, where all sorts of orgies take place. The result of the carnival is that the Monts de Piete (pawn shops) do a good business, the lower order pledging even their most necessary articles of furniture in order to foolishly spend their money in revelry. Latest news : Since writing the above, telegrams have just arrived, informing us that Count Bismark has dissolved the Prussian Chambers, and that King Wilhelm and the Prime Minister will try to govern the country after their own fashion. There is great excitement in Prussia. The news has come too late to give you more particulars. The Moldo-Wallachians, tired of the tyranny of their Prince Couza, have sent him to the right-about. The revolution in the Danubian Principalities has been a very quiet affair— no war, no bloodshed. Prince Couza can now join the concert of royal exiles. The army and people of Wallachia were on a perfect understanding. A deputation has left~Bucharest for Brussels, and the vacant crown is to be laid at the feet of the Comte De Flandres, brother of the young King of the Belgians. The question is, will he accept it ? The taking of Bagdad by the marauders ot the Federal army will in no way interrupt the amicable relations between the United States and France. It is now ascertained that the surprise of that town took place at the instigation of a soi-disant General Crawford, in the •ervice of Juarez. The town of Bagdad is now restored to order, and those who took part in the late attack hare been furnished by the Federal General Weitzel, Imperial troops now occupying the town. t -„.■, Tha Cabinet of Washington, fearing that the feeling of animosity between General Weitzel and the Mexican General Meja might endanger the peace now existing between itself and Maximilian, has sent out General Brown to command the American army at Texas. Weitzel has been recalled. This evident proof on the part of Johnson 'of an intention to remain neutral in the Mexican affair will no doubt be the means of hastening the return of the French troops. The reconstruction of the Union is going on steadily. . The amendment to the Constitution, which will have the effect of changing the basis of representations, will no doubt be another subject of much contention between the North and South.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18660510.2.13

Bibliographic details

Daily Southern Cross, Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXII, Issue 2744, 10 May 1866

Word Count
1,664

PARIS. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) February 26. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXII, Issue 2744, 10 May 1866

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