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The Daily Southern Cross.

LUOEO NON UKO. " H I lme been ovtingnislioil, jot thcio uso A Uiousaiul beacons from the spuik I boio."

JWIDAY, JANUARY 20.

By far the most important news leccirod from the South by the ' T?anga(ira' yesterday was of the separation meeting at Olago, described as being one of the most crowded and influential meetings ever held in Dunedin. Ju this our Southern friends have followed the example of Auckland, with this exception, that they go in for the separation of the two islands only. They have held a monster meeting, and passed resolutions affirming the necessity for the separation of the two islands ; ihoy have formed an association, called " the Southern Separation "League;" they have opened a subscription list to pay the expenses of the movement, and a petition was to bo drawn up to her Majesty the Queen and Imperial Parliament, setting forth their grievances, and praying for separation. We have not, of course, room for the extended report, occupying a space of eight columns in the Otago Daily Times, but we give an abridged report, which Mill sufficiently inform our readers of the su.b3ln.lloc of the proceedings 111I 11 klio speeches made at this meeting there is frequent and complimentary allusion made to the movement by this province to obtain separation. The Superintendent of Olago, who Mas 111 the chair, recommends the very course which Auckland has taken, that is, separation for ourselves. He says, after alluding to the adverse opinions held by Nelson and Canterbury men, and the probability of failure if the}' attempted to get tho separation of the Northern and Middle Isl uuls— " My own conviction is that the proper w aj<- to " set about the task is tins, to insist upon sepa- " ration for ourselves as a province," and '• by " such a scheme we should avoid tho expense of " a double Government." He further remarked thai, by demanding separation for themsolve., it would probably end in their obtaining separation for the whole island, but otherwise they would meet with the same rcbufl' that they had befoie experienced from Canterbury and Nelson, and " he had no doubt that before long the "eyes of the Canterbury people would be quite " open to the fact that they had not made the " best bargain 111 the world by joining with '" Wellington to defeat tho interests of the more " important province of Auckland " The Superintendent then impresses upon them the necessity of securing members in tho Assembly and Provincial Council who would vote for separation, and who would not vote against it, and he would deal with those who voted against it by memorialising the Governor to dissolve the Assembly, so that they might have tho opportunity of sending up new men pledged to support thei r view's. Theso sentiments were greatly applauded. Mr. Vogel was tho mover of tho first resolution for the separation of the Middle from tho Northern Island as conducive to the interests of both islands, and he remarks on the effect of separation to the Northern Islaud, that " Auckland has now become an exceed- | "ingly prosperous and rich place, and indubi- " tably the province has immense lcsourccs. I "believe there cannot be a doubt " that if Auckland only possessed "that measure of Government which is requisite it would become a very important " colony, especially if it was connected the " other provinces of tho Northern Island. I "refer, however, to Auckland in par- " ticular, because so far as population "and development are concerned Ancle"land may almost bo considered tho Northern " Island for our present purposes." Again, Mr. Gillies, the late Postmaster-General, maintains that the removal of the scat of Government "means not a belter Government for " the Middle Island, not a better Government "Tor Otago, but misgovcrnment of both tho " largest portions of the colony — of both Auck- " land and Otago." Judging from the proceedings and the comments in the daily press, the position taken up is this, that tho Southern Separation League a«lcs for the separation of the Middle Island, but failing the co-operation of the other Southern provinces, it will demand separation for Otago, and probably Southland, -which can be counted on. It will be seen by the report of tho meeting that the resolutions were carried unanimously j but we must join with tho Superintendent of Otngo in tho belief that in beginning M'itli an effort to got separation for the Middle Island they are beginning at the wrong end, and wo may congratulate oursolvo3 that wo have avoided the samo mistake in Auckland. It is also a subject for congratulation that our efforts hero, in this important movoment, have been viewed in a proper spirit. The Otago Daily

Times says on tho separation, movement here:— " Tf tlio people of Ofcago arc equally earnest " they may hope for success." But wo must urge upon the principal actors in this movement the necessity for even an increased exertion, and upon the public generally the necessity for their contributing liberally to ihe object. Very considerable funds will be required in addition to those already subscribed to cany out tho movement successfully ; and wo should be glad to see the people in the country and out districts talco up tho matter more energetically. It is a subject that comes home to all of us, and it should be borne in mind that we must count on tho active hostility of Tarauald, Hawko's Tiny, and Wellington, whose interests are with tho Cook's Straits settlements of the Middle Island, and who will all -join in maintaining a connection which will enable them to sustain their expenditure out of the revenues collected in Auckland and Olngo. It must also be remembered that Mr. Featherston, the Superintendent of Wellington, is going homo at the expiration of his term of office, on the business of tho General Government, and that it is well understood that ho will use all the influences he possesses against Ihe separation of the Noi thorn Island. Talcing the separation movement in Auckland with that which has taken place in Otago, wo may reasonably believe now, that the removal o* the seat of Government will ultimately produce bitter fruits for those who advocated it, and place this province in a more satisfactory footing as it regards its Government and general prosperity.

Tun single item of American news brought two days ago via. California and tlio Sandwich Islands has sn importance beyond it far beyond any single defeat or victory either lo the North or South in the present sanguinary struggle. If it be true, and there seems no grounds on which to doubt the truth of the statement, that Abraham Lincoln has again been elected to the Presidency, the significance- of the fact is greater than can easily bo calculated — greater too by far, we arc bold to sa}', than the actors in the election had any idea of. Since the famous declaration of American independence, nearly a hundred years ago, the American .Republic has never stood in a more dangerous position than it does now. A step may save it as a great nation — a stop may destroy its hopes of becoming «o for ever. Wo do not hold the shallow doctrine that the war through which it has been going so doggedly, and at such truly appalling sacrifices, during the past four years, has been a simple and unmitigated loss to the nation. On the contrary, we are inclined to tlnnlc that this contact vnlh stern realities will probably be found lo have been worth even the tremendous price that has been paid for it. The character ior vapouring which had so justly become associated wnh Cousin Jonathan was one totally opposed to anything like real greatness in a people, and this tendency could only be driven out of the nation by a long couise of hard knocks. Ct is not worth while now for Amei leans to talk in exaggerated strains about trifles, as they have some realities to speak of. Possibly, nay, we think piobably, the disease was so deeply imbedded m the transatlantic mind as to require even more discipline still to correct it, and, if so, doubtless it Mill get it; the very news to which wo have referred in the beginning of this article seems, lo hold out a prospect of this land. President Lincoln is the representative of an aggressive policy on the part of the North, and must be the greatest provoi ation to resistance of the most desperate character in the South. His course has been marked by bloodshed in a degree greater than perhaps has marked the course of anj' conqueror of modern time?, except Napoleon, and yet President Lincoln has been no conqueror. As the representative of an idea, he has had llio power placed in his uncontrolled hands to e\pcnd more treasure and to lavish more blood than has ever frllcn to the lot of one ruler in so short a period, so far as we know, in times cither ancient or modern. It is ono of the most remaikable phenomena of the age, this power of an idea over the destinies of half a world. It is the habit in this utilitarian age of ours to look with wonder, not unmingled with contempt, at the fanaticism, as we teun it, of the f crusading spirit ■which moveJ all JHurope at intervals for so long a tune. We profess to be lost in astomshmenc at the thought of men actually rushing off to fight in an imaginary quarrel to gain wholly unpractical ends. And yet now in the most utilitarian country in tho world, where the standard of the currency seemed to have caused every other standard lo be lost sight of , where the immortal dollar carried or seemed to carry all before it, wo have a contest costing as much life, and far more money, than any three of these crusading expeditions, for an object as thoroughly visionary as theirs could have boon. America has been torn and mangled in a manner truly horrible for tho last four years ; her blood has flowed like water during the whole period; her treasures havo been all but exhausted m the struggle, and her credit is now very lowindeed; her very liberties ha^e boon trampled undeifool, and there is no remedy, — and all for what ° J3oyond question for an ute't ! The North says for tho idea of putting down slavery, which it yet allows co exist in the midst of its own States unchecked and unmeddlod with. The South says, and Europe echoes her view, for the idea of subjugating the South toher dominion, contrary to tho Constitution; aud this has hitherto proved a project purely chimerical. We do not say that the States have been ruined for an idea; but we do say that even now r — and the end is not even in sight yet — their peculiar prosperity has received a blow from which oven the vast resources at their command will not soon rocover. And now the re-election of President Lincoln means this — that the icloa is even yet strong in the minds of the Northern people ; that tho war contractors are still a little longer to reap fortunes from the needs of their country ; that the rights of citizens are even still to be held of secondary importance in the land ]jai' ovcoUcnoe of undoubted liberty ; that blood and treasure are still to bo pourod out to the last; and that the people aro prepared to risk what may be tho final result. The world at large is interested in this choice. It contains not merely an awful menace to tho Southern States, but a warning and an instruction to the civilised world at largo on the subject of the reign of ideas. To the nations at a distance the prospect is ouo rather of deliverance from an awkward menace than anything more embarrassing. Tt is true that, wero the war at an end to-morrow, there would be a great army ready to work its pleasure with tho North, and that pleasure could not be controlled. Canada might bo invaded, or England insulted, and tho President would not be able to holp himself. But Lincoln's re-

election pi'ovidcs against the possibility of that. ' The war caunot be over to-morrow, "or^ next month — no, not, wo imagine, finally over next year. And if it were apparently ab an end by the subjugation of the South, it would take as largo a forco to hold the country thus conquered as it did to conquer it. The North U even now impoverished. It is useless to deny it, hovrcver easy it may bo to draw imaginary pictures of a golden future. If the South submits to conquest per force, there will be no golden future for the States during the next generation. America will be the most heavily burdened Slate in the world ; taxes will weigh down her industrial population, and the taxes will hardly suffice to keep sufficient force to hold under the Southern States, whic ' , like a second Hungary or Poland, will be for ever fermenting into rebellion. This is the prospect which the election of Lincoln a second time to the Presidency seems to us to open to America. Wo may be talcing too gloomy a view, but we fear we are not. One thing seems pretty certain — that if once such a state of things does gain the mastery in the States, the prophecy of Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton when the war broke out can hardly fail of being fulfilled ; and the war undertaken to prevent the separation into two States will result in separation into three or four.

There are to bo thii teen races at the forthcoming regatta on the 30th instant. The fust will be a fouroar gig race, at 930p in : first piize £20, second £12, thild £6. The second lace will take place at 10 o'clock, and be contested by yachts under five tonb for the following piues-£2O, CIO, £5. Third race, 10.30 : Scullers' match, open to all comers ; .£lO, pieseuted by Mi. J. Copland, with £."i added, second £1, thiid £3. Fouith nice, 11 • Boats belonging to JT.M.'« ships; £10, €5. Fiith i.ice. 11.30 . Tiading vessels under 20 tons; £20, £10, £5 Sixth Race, 12 o'clock- Foi licensed bub nmiegisteied cai go boats; fiist pure, silver cup, value £30, piesented by Messrs. Shaw, Saville, and Co. Seventh lace, 12,30 : Tiading vessels fiom 20 to 45 tons ; £30, £15, £S. tighth race, 1 p.m. : Yachts, fholon.i r.ncl upwauls ; £20, £10, £.">. Ninth lace, 2 p in. : Ships' gigs, pulled by four o.ii s; £12, £G, £3. Tenth i ace, 2 30: Watelmen's boats, fitst pii/w, a boat (piesented by Messis. Jloolden B'otheis. London) and £2 added, second pii/o£G, thlid €3. Eleventh iace, 3 p.m.: Dingy lace, for bojs bom in the colony , £3, JC2, 431. Twelfth laco. 3 30 p.m. . Boats sculled with one oar ; £3, £2. 'Ihiileonth race, i p.m. : O.inoe iace, £20, £10. An ,I'ljoumed meeting of the Chamber of Commerce was advciliscd to lie held yestoul.iy afternoon, at tlnco o'clock, m the Council loom, Foi t street, but not a single member put in an appeaiance, and the meeting consequently stands adjoin ned until next Tluusday. The Kesident Magistrate's Comt yesteiday was mainly occupied in he.viing a claim for £50 damages for the false imprisonment of the chief officer on boaid the ship • Talbot' foi 71 days. Puehaul M. Phillips, fhst mate of that vessel, was the plaintiff, and Thomas James, captain, the defendant. The evidence adduced, which will be found at length in auother pait of the papei, went to show that when the ship ' T.ilbot ' was seven weeks out from London to Auokland, the captain fell out with his mate, and some angry wonls weie exchanged on both sides, the lesulfc of which was that the mate was ouleied to his cabin, put off duty foi the lemaindei of the voyage, and. oideied to be served out with ship-iations daily, namely, pound and a hsilf of suit meat, the same quantity of biscuit, and water. This was plaintiff's pnncipal diet, and all that w.is allowed by the captain's oulei-i. The evidence went to show that, although plaintiff was not locked in his cabin, he was not allowed to walk on deck in the captain's piesence, and the pa=sengeis wcie censuied for conveising with him, oi giving him food. The case was veiy minutely gone into, and oveiy fact carefully elucidated by his Worbhip, who le&eived judgment until to moiiow, in oidei that he nu^'lit h.ue an oppoitnmty of looking ovei the evidence. A schoolboy had a wontleiful c^eipe yesteiday fiom being tioddcn to death by a hoioe. It is customary for the boys at the Catholic school, top of Wellington sfcieefc, to amuse themselves l>y liinniug after any omuihus coming along Pitt and Hobsonsfcicets, md jupimiig on the foot-board to get a tide Their chief enjoyment is to pull each other off. Yesterday morning as the Ponsonby Iload and Newton omnibus was pissing the boys began theii fiolic, a cai coming np about iiFfcy yaids behind thp omnibus. The duver of this car appeared to pay as much attention as possible to prevent an accident, but one little fellow had been sent spiawliug on the off side,j and got between the hoi-e's legs. He was knocked down, and struck by the foic and lnuil fiet of tin* animal, at last a kick which &ent him between the cart wheels. The caib pished o\er the boy, who got up appaiently unhuit— and van away j to join his companions. Not the slightest blame could have attached to the mau if the accident had been fatal. The annual meeting of the llavelock Band of Hope was hold last evening. 'Ihe chair was taken athalfpasfc seven o'clock by the president, Mr. Taylor, and tlie meeting v» as opened by singing over a tempolance hymn, followed by pia\er. The Chan man then made lomaiks lolative to the name the society boie, hoping that each memlw would be leady at all times and undei all cucumstances to adheic <is fiimly to their pnnoiples as did the noble heio after whoso name this tempeiance band was called. The tepoit was then read by Mi, Gaison, tho tieasuior, which was vei y satisfactory, inasmuch as theie were funds in hand after all expenses of the past year had been defrayed ; tho committee having met all liabilities by monthly voluntary contributions. Mr. Biaino then addressed fie meet ng, and naiiated some mtei eating incidents connected with his eaity history. Ffe poeoedeil to impress upon the audience tho nci cssity foi more cffoit and mci eased exeition to put dov n the mighty toe of humanity. Mr. I'ioiich, well and favom ably known in the ranks of iho tonipeiance cause, then gave a .shoit addiess on tlic clncp "knots," by wh'di the society was bound together, "touch not, "taste not," handle not." The meeting was then closed by singing tlio Temperance National Anthem, and a slioit prayer from Mr. French. The meeting was inteiesting and instructive. There weio nearly 40 cases entered for hearing at the Tlesident Magntiate's Court yesterday, but owing to the piotiaolpd healing ot the action for false imprisonment on board a vessel, only a few were disposed of. Tho lemainder stand adjourned until Tuesday next.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Daily Southern Cross., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXI, Issue 2341, 20 January 1865

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3,233

The Daily Southern Cross. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXI, Issue 2341, 20 January 1865

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