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THE NIXON MONUMENT MOVEMENT. PUBLIC MEETING.

On Saturday afternoon last a piiblic meeting, convened lo consider the desirability of erecting a monument to the memory of tlio late Colonel Nixon, was held afc tlio Exchange Hotel, Shortland-street. There was a large attendance of gentlemen present, amongst whom wo recognised the following : — MajorGeneral Galloway, Mr. Holt, Private Secretary to his Excellency the Governor ; Liout.-Col. Do Quincey, Mr. A. Martin, Mr. Win. Buclriand, Captain Hardington, Mr. E. Maclean, Lieut. Bassett, Mr. Pcirce. Captain Dinnin, Mr. R. J. Creighton, Dr. Wcekes, Dr. Fischer, Mr. T. Rogers, MrJt. Robertson, Mr. H. P. Stark, Mr. Gr. M.O'Rorko, Mr. Jamos Runciman. On the motion of Mr. W. Buckland, Mr. Every Maclean took the chair. Captain Harrington begged to state that he had received a lotter that morning from Captain Walmcsley, stating that both he and other officers and men of the Defonco Force would co-oporate with the committee in anything that was done. (Hear.) Lieutenant Bissett said ho was not aware that any resolution had been prepared or any decisive step taken as to the proposed intention to erect a monument, or to pay any other tribute of esteem to the memory of the late Colonel Nixon. That meeting, as far as he was aware, had been made public for the purpose of getting the opinion of the peoplo present — both Auckland people, the members of Cavalry Corps, the settlers, and any others who might choose to attend. He bolieved there was a difference of opinion as to tho site of tho proposed monument, as also whether the tribute of respect should be a monument, or whether it should bo embodied in the shape of a public school, institute, or asylum. Ho had heard "several different opinions expressed that morniug in regard to the form the tribute should take ; but doubtless they would hear more by getting the opinion of as many peoplo then prosont as possible, and this course was necessary in order to make the thing perfectly clear and open to the public, lie had nothing especially to propose himself, except ho might say one word — and perhaps he might be thought selfish in making such a remark ; perhaps also lie might be speaking the opinion of some of the Cavalry Corps ; and it might be thought a selfish feeling on their part ; still he did not think it was any the less valuable for that : his idea was that there should be a monument erected to tho memory of Colonel Nixon, and that it should bo near Otahuhu. (Hear.) For his own part, he had not been many years a neighbour of Colonel Nixon's, buthe had been suflicientlylongtocause him to entertain the highestrespectforthegallant colonel ; and other men who had been in the district before him, who had had heavy up-hill work, had been struggling in company with Colonel Ni\on, who had proved himself tho very corner stone of Mangarei. (Hear, hoar.) And, therefore, he thought a monument of his worth should be erected in Mangarei. He did not mean to say that if a committee were formed, and they thought it should be erected iv Auckland, he would offer any opposition to it. He had too strong a feeling of respect for the memory of Colonel Nixon to cause him to go against any monument ; but he would prefer its being ab the place he had mentioned. Colonel Nixon had command of the Cavalry Corps, though he (Mr. Bassett) could not say they had done very much ; still the colonel was their commander. He was commander also of the Defence Force, and they had done more, whilst the eolonol had given his life to the country. The men of that corps t\ ere raised principally from the Mangarei, Otahuhu, and Onohunga districts. Hehad previously expressed his opinion, when the subject was first brought forward by the cavalry, that they would bo wanting in their duty if they did not do all they could to express their esteem for the late Colonel Nixon. He was sorry he had said so much, but he only wanted to let the meeting know what was the state of feeling ainong&t the settlers. (Applause.) Mr. TV. Buckland said, having known Colonel Nixon from his arrival in tho country, and fully appreciating his meiits — as they all must have done who were at all acquainted with him — he thought there would bo put oae feeling as to tho desire of the inhabitants of the province at large to assist in some testimonial whereby they would perpetuate his virtues. He must confess he was at variance with the plan proposed by his friend who had just spoken. He did not think the monument to Colonel Nixon's namo should be a local one — that it should be placed in a corner of the province. For himself he must admit he was an Otahuhu man, and had Otahuhu prejudices, as all of them had doubtless more or less ; but he would certainly bo extremely sorry to see that feeling, which Mr. Bassett had candidly told them was a selfish one, carried out — to obliterate the name of Colonel Nixon — to hide under a -bushel the virtues of the man, instead of placing the monumont where everybody could see it ; and the city of Auckland was the only place where the inhabitants of Auckland could bo expected to subscribe for the monument to be erected in. His own idea was, that if Colonel Nixon was alive — seeing the manner in which lie had devoted his energies at all times to a life of usefulness — that in the determination to carry out something in the way of a tribute of respect, the gallant Colonel would have suggested that there should bo something of utility in their remembrance. "What shape tho proposed tribute of respect might take he could not state. Various ideas had been suggested — that a monument should be erected to his memory to express their esteem for the departed ; and certainly that was what they must do. But the cost of that, or anything to commemorate his memory, would depend upon the subscriptions, and these would be influenced greatly by the manner in which it might bo proposed to spend the money. For instance, if they determined to have the monument — to erect something at Otahuhu — then he was vory much afraid the public purse would bo closed : but if something useful wore proposed, then the effect would be found directly opposite, and the public would be liberal. In a conversation he had had with Dr. Fischer, it had been suggested to him that a large stone fountain would be useful at the head of Queen-street— being, in fact, both useful and ornamental. The design could easily be prepared ; and by this means they woxild perpetuate the memory of the_ Colonel as well as providing a usefid and beautiful piece of work. His (Mr. B.s) own idea had been previously touched upon by Mr. Bassett. Ho would like to see a scholarship secured, as tho timo, ho hoped, would soon arrive when they would have a University in Auckland ; and to a Nixon's Scholarship he felt convinced the people of Auckland would rather subscribe than to a monument. He thought a committee should be appointed that day, and they should bo requested to bring up their report, say in six weeks or two months ; then the subscribers would be able to see what could be done with the funds. He had just jotted down tho names of a few gentlemon whom ho intended to propose to serve on the committee, and if the Chairman would permit him, he would propose a resolution to that effect. In writing down these names, he wished to observe, he had carefully excluded military gentlemen from tho list, as he felt they were sure of every support from Colonel Nixon's brothers-in-arms ; still, at the same time, he thought it should be a purely civilian affair. His proposition was that a committee, composed of tho following gentlemen, bo appointed: — Messrs. McLean, A. Martin, Dr. Fischer, D.Graham, R. J. Creighton, Lieutenant Bassett, aud Dr. Weekes, — for the purposo of taking into consideration tho best moans of comemorating the memory of Colonel Nixon. Ho believed some resolution of that sort would be desirable to be agreed upon, but he would not move it in form until ascertaining whether he had the feeling of tho meeting with him.

Mr. Holt said his excellency the~ Governor, had desired him to attend the meeting on his behalf, and to assure them "of his hearty sympathy in anything they might decide upon. The Governor also Dado him to state that he had been told that Colonel Nixon had left tvrq~ sisters who were in somewhat straitened cirjjS;" cumsfcances — were, in fact, not well off ; anft his Excellency suggested that'a small portion of the money which might be subscribed should be expended in the erection of a small or plain momiment, whilst the bulk of the subscriptions should bo forwarded to the two sisters. When the monument was erected it might be stated thereon why such a plain one had been decided upon ; and they would thus, perhaps, be acting more in accordance with Colonel .Nixon's own feelings, if the money wore devoted principally to the help of his two sisters. His Excellency had told him to suggest this course being adopted, and possibly it might meet with the approval of the meeting. He might be as a colonist permitted, whilst speaking, to give expression to his tribute of respect to the memory of a fellow-colonist, who had lost his life whilst nobly fighting the battles of his adopted country. On this head he spoke for his excellency the Governor and for himself. (Applause.) Lieutenant Bassett said he should be very sorry, for one, if anything of a private nature were introduced into the matter at all by any inscription on the monument. He would even suggest to tho reporters that it should not appear in the public prints ; because, if sent home, it might grate rery harshly on somebody's feelings. Major-General Galloway said, he had attended the meeting for the purpose of showing every mark of respect to a good and valiant soldier. (Hear, hear.) For himself, he was in f your of a monument, and ho trusted it would be carried out successfully. Mr. Creighton thought it would not be well to limit the memorial to Colonel Nixon simply to a monument ; "bub that another object should be aimed at also. The monument would be erected as a matter of course, and he thought the meeting ought to be called upon to decide tho site of that monument — whether it shonld be in Mangarei, at Otahuhu, or in Auckland. It was his belief that sufficient funds could bo raised at once to endow a scholarship in the university which they were sure to have in time ; and at tho same time to raise a good monuinont to Colonel Nixon. (Hear, hear.) Both these objects ought to be combined, and they could leave the details to the management of tho general committee to ba appointed subsequently. Mr. Bpckiand said it was necessary that there should be unity of purpose : they must all act together or they would get nothing at all. He was only anxious to have the opinion of tho meeting taken, and therefore he would move : " That this meeting is desirous of commemorating the memory of Colonel Nixon by tho erection of a monument." Lieutenant Bassett seconded the motion, and on being put by the Chairman it was carried. Mr. BtrcKtAND said since he had first spoken on the subject he had felt convinced that if they wauteel to get the people of Auckland to subscribe to the object intended they must havo the monument erected in the heart of the province. He would propose, " That such monument be erected in some convenient place in Auckland." Mr. Mahks seconded this resolution. Lieutenant Bassett said he disliked even tho appearance of squabbling about such a matter ; and therefore he would propose, without any remarks, " That it is the opinion of this meeting that the monument ought to be erocted in the neighbourhood of Otahuhu." Seconded by Mr. E. Bobebtsox. Mr. Buckland could only say that he took the memory of Colonel Nixon to be a colonial affair, and not a mere local one. And that being the case he thought his monument should be erected in the most conspicuous place of tho chief city in the colony. (Applause.) Mr. McLkod thought they should keep in view the place where Colonel Nixon's services were performed and where he died. He consequently considered it should be erected in the place „ where he fell in the province of Auck'(A Voice : "He did not fall at Mangarei.") Dr. Fischer moved an amendment " That the decision of tke site be left to the committee." (Hear, hear.) Mr. Martin seconded the amendment. The Chukman then put Dr. Fischer's amendment, which was lost on the voices. Mr. Bassetts amendment was next put, and lost on, a show of hands. The original motion was carried amidst applause. The Crr airman then read the list of the committee as follows, and the names were agreed to : — Messrs. Maclean, Martin, Bassett, Dr. Fischer, Mr. Creighton, Dr. Weekes, Mr. W. Buekland. Dr. Pollen, Captain Hutton, Messrs. D. Graham, Holt, Hardington, Captain Walmesley, Lieut.-Colonel de Quincey, Messrs. A. Buckland, E. Eobertson, J. Ruuciman, T. Eogers, B. Harris, T. Shipherd, juu., E. King, and Colonel Balnoavis. Mr. Buckiand moved, "That subscription lists be immediately opened under the name of ' The Nixon Memorial Fund.' " Seconded by Mr. Ckeighton and carried. Subscription lists were then handed roi;nd, and about £100 was subscribed in the room. The meeting dispersed at about half-past four o'clock, the business having occupied about an hour. __^___ -

The vapid improvement of the township of Onehiuiga is very noticeable. A few yeais ago this now lively and important place could hardly boast of more than an occasional ship and a few coasting cutters in its harbour, and the advent of a steamer was quite an event for a nine days 1 chat. Since the war, however, hotels have sprung up, barracUs been erected, barges bnilt, and even a steamer owes its existence to Onehunga enterprise. In the harbour it is now no uncommon sight to see five or six steamers, besides full-rigged ships, barques, bugs, and schooners, from all parts of the colonies ; even the great Onehunga bugbear, the " bar," lias lost one-half of its terrois. A channel has been buoyed off, aud ships can enter and leave in most • of weather. The communication with Auckland, which a few years ago was a matter of difficulty, is now so improved that theie are omnibuses starting every hour both to and from Auckland, and we are soon to have them even every half -hour. "Work makes work," and with all this iucreased traffic it is certainly necessary that somethiug should be done, and done quickly, to improve the roads immediately arouud the settlement, aud to repair the wharves that are fast falling to decay. That some permanent alteration is contemplated, and even decided upon, by the Provincial Government in this latter respect, we have every reason to believe ; but the bad condition of the beach and surrouuding roads from the increased traffic is daily becoming more evident as the winter sets in. Tho large amount of Commissariat traffic renders it necessary that something should be done, and we thiuk that public money could not be better expended than in. these really necessary improvements in this thriving little township. — " Daily Southern Cioss," May 28. A correspondent who facetiously signs himself "A Lifer" writes to ask us "if it is probable the 65th Regiment will ever see England any more ?'' Seeing that the gallant regiment has been twice on the point of embarking for the "old country," and has been suddenly oulered to the "right-about-face," this may appear a difficult question to answer. We may say, however, that as the colonial term of service of the 65fch men has so long expired, we heartily sympathise with them, and can only express a hope thao the long-expected release may not be far off. When it does come, their long and arduous service here will be something to emblazon on the colours of their regiment. — "Daily Southern Cross," Juue 3. We understand that Dr. Hector, who has justly returned from Coromandel, intends visiting Bay also, if ho can conveuienbly get there. We do not know the result of Dr. Hector's researches at Coromandel, except that he was extremely puzzled to find fionx the natxire of the country that gold was found there in such quantities as it has been. It was his intention to have visited the Thames, but for the unfavourable weather experienced when he left Coromandel.—" Daily Southern Cross," June 17.

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THE NIXON MONUMENT MOVEMENT. PUBLIC MEETING., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XX, Issue 2167, 30 June 1864

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THE NIXON MONUMENT MOVEMENT. PUBLIC MEETING. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XX, Issue 2167, 30 June 1864

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