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PORT OF. AUCKLAND.

June 23 — Stronj.N.E winds, thick rainy weather throughout.

ARRIVALS. - Hnrbnrg, Jmrque, from San Franciieo Ceres, schooner, from Port Falrjr, Victoria

DRPAIITURKS. Alexandra, s.s., forTauranga. Pakelm, brig, for Port Wniknto.

VESSELS EXPECTED, H M. s s. Salamander, from England, via Cape of Good llopo Flyiug Foam, ship, from ].iverpool. Maxwell, ship, from London. Amerilmm, ihip, from London. G*b»lva, ship, from London. Morning Star, ship, from Londcn. alary AVurren, »hip. from London PotlUnd, ship, from London. Glendcron, ship, from London. Ironside, ship, fioin London. Annie Laurie, barque, from Glasgow. Guadalette, barque, fiom Adelaide, via Sydney Constance, barque, from Sydney. Mary Agnes, barquo, fiom Sydney. Koseive, barque, fiom Melbourne Novelty, barque, from Sydney Alice Camcion, barque, from Sydney. Constance, barque, from Newcastle A W. Ste\ ens, barque, from Newcastle. Charlotte Andrews, barque, from S>dney. Frederick, barque, from llobart Town. Louis and Mniiun, brig, from Sydney. Hebe, brig, from Newcastle Deva, brig, from Adelaide. Waverly, brig, from London. Alliance, brigantine, from Fnlmouth, via Cape of Good Hopo Tauranga, schooner, from Tauransta Will AVatch, cutter, from South Sea Islands

PROJUCrKDIS DEPARTURES. Prince Alfred, s s , for Sydney Wellington, s s , for Southern Provinces Sir George Grey, ship, foi London Avalanche, ship, for Japan Ottolin.i, bnrquc, for 13atavia Duke of Eothesiy, barque, foi Call no Surprise, schooner, for Taiunnga, via. Mercury Bay. Mary Ann Christina, schooner, for Taranaln. Sea_Breoze,_schooner,,for Russell.

VJiSSEW IN" nAKBOUK. (This, list does not inchulo coasting cutters ) HM. s s Miranda, from T.iuranga. Prince Alfred, s s , horn Sydney Novelty, s s , from tlio Manukau. Randfiv, p s , from Tauranga Bella llarini, coal hulk Queen of the Deap, ship, from London Golden Fleece, sbip, fiom Melbourne A\*lanche, ship, fiom London Sir George Giey baique, fiom the Cape of Good Hope. Fories, baique, fiom Sin Francisco Dm\f of llothe&ay, barque, fiom Hamburgh, via Harbuig, barque, from Ran Viancisco Melbourne and Wellington Ellen T.e.Yis, barque, fiom Addaide Ottohni, barque, from Nt-vcistle. Itit.i, brig, from Sydney Venus, brig, from Adelaide. Papeete, brig, fiom Tahiti, South Sea Islands Samoa, schooner, fiom Tahiti Siupiise, schooner, fioia Kaipara. Uoslyn brigantine, from Adelaide Salamander, schooner, from Dunerim Ceres, scliooncr, from I'ort Fany, Victona Success, schooner, fiom Napiei SciGull, schooner, fioin Kiupaia Zill ih, schooner, from Kapicr and Last Coast. Mavis, schoonei, from Tauraiißa Ciest of the Wave schoonei, from C'hristchurch Sea Hieezc, schooner, from Itnsst.ll Fairy, schooner, from Mongonui

ENTERED IN WARDS— COASTWISE. Jt T s*E 23— Surah Alice, 15 tons, Xeiman, from Coromandel, with 1 liorse 23 — Tui, 22 tons, Holmes, from Waiheki, \.ith 17 tons firewood 23— George, 15 tons, Nicholas, from the Thames with 30 casks pork, 3 tons gum, 50 bushels wheat, 50 bushels maize, 43 pigs, 4 sheep, 2 kegs lard, 3 bags pumpkins 23— Flora M'Douald, 18 tons, M'Kenne, from AVaipu, with 150 bushels wheat, 50 bushels oats Passengers — G. 23— Mary, 22 tons, Brown, fiom Waihcki, with 45 tons firewood 23 — William and Julia, 33 tons, Scott, from Mahuraugi, with 44 tons fiiewood, 00 feet house blocks Passengers — 3 23— 0n0, 17 tons, btephens, fiom Waiheki, with 30 tons firewood 23— Prince of Wales, 23 tons, Lawrence, from Omaha, witli 40 tons flrew ood 23— F»ncv, 87 tons, Hireling, from Great Earlier, with GOO r»ils, 130 po3ts, 40 feet house blocks, 8 tons firewood

CLEARED OUTWARDS— COASIWISE. June 23— Wellington, <; s , 2GI tons, Francis, for Nap:er and the South, with original c-ugo from Wellington for Napier, and 100 barrels ammunition, 1 parcel, for Wellington , 1 bale paper, 12 barrels ammumtiou, 1 cast weights and measures, for Dnnedia Passengers — Dr Hector, Messrs Rolton. Peliime, H Solomon, Braithnjite, L Kells — Combes and Daldy, agents 23— Sarah Alice, 15 tons. Neinian, for Coromandel, with snndrie 1 ! Passenpers — 9 23— Petrel, 17 tuns, Matzen, for Wangarei, with 22 sheep and sundries Passengers — 2 23 — Tui, 22 tons, Holme 0 , for Waiheli, in ballast 23— Planet, 20 tons, Beg, for Wangapoa, with sundries 13 — Boneta, 2S tons, Peterson, for Wangarei, with sundries Passenger — 1 23— Three Sister3, 28 tons, Purchard, for Tauranga, with sundries Passengers — 4 23— 0n0, 17 tons, Stephens, for Waiheki. with sundries 23 — William and Julia, 33 tons, Scott, for Mahurangi, m ballist. 23 — Mary, 22 tons, Brown, for AVaiheki, in ballast 23 — Fancy, 27 tons, Harding, for Great Barrier and Tauranga, with sundries 23— Prince of Wales, 23 ton', lawrence, for Mahurangi, with sundr es Passengers— 3

AERIVAL OF THE BARQUr, HARBURG, FROJI SAN FRANCISCO The H»rburg, 380 tons, Captain Thomson, anchored in the stream jesterday morning She left fean Francisco on th» 13th of April, and had fine weather up to the 2fith of May, after which strong southeily gales prevailed, with occasional calms. The Harburg first made the land at the Poor Knights Islands on the 20th instant She has been 1} ing off Rangitoto since the da> before yesterday The Harburg brings one passenger — Dr Ca'npbell— and a cargo of wheat and 5,000 half b»gs flour, consigned to Messis Blown, Campbell, and Co

MANIFEST OF TIIE CAIt"O IN THE EESERVE [Now on her passage fiora Melbourne to Auckland ] 29 cases jam, 1 case sauces order , 20 tubs butter, 23 cases, Comrie and Burt , 1,300 Ings flour, order. 53 coses merchandize, George "Webster , 9 packages agricultural implements, 39 packages drapery, M Jlonks . 22 ciatcs merchandise, 10 kegs nails, 2 bundles trucks, 7 ca«ks oil, fO drums oil, 2 cases chaff-cutters, 1 case weights, 4 case3 sundries, 5 tons pig iron, S H Smith , 14 packages meichandise, C Petschler ; 250 boxes candles, order ; 10 cisksbeef, S House and Co , 20 cases chicory, Gilfillan and Co , 7 pVgs drapen , S T Cohen , 1 bale merchandise, P. M GreenandCo 100 bags flour, Woolley* Co , 100 cases bottled stout, 81 cares bottled ale, 100 cases brandy, Cruiekshank, Smart, and Co , 100 boxes soap, 20 half-boxes soap, 5 casks purified tillo v, Alfred AVoolley and Co , 2 cases merchandise, Lewis Brs , 40 boxes tobacco, 40 bags flour, 24 cases biscuits, 459 boxes candles, 12 ovens, 2 casks hardware, 5 keg» nails, 1 bundle steel, 2SO bags sugar, IS b urels coffee, 15 hhds rum, 10 quarter-casks rum, 50 cases sardines, 25 cases axe handles, order , 13 cases galvanized iron, Cruickshank, Smart, and Co , 22 cases confectionery, Gilfillan and Co , 10 bales gunny bags, .1 S Macfarlane and Co , 10 cases sarsaptrilla, V A Phillips , 50 boxes candles, A Woolley and Co , 6 cases Swiss cigars, order 43 cases port wine, 1 bale corks, 1 case preserves 1 parcel, 20 cases biscuit, A "Woollej and Co ; 3 pair bellows, 3 bundles spades, 40 cases windows, 6 trucks, 12 ovens, 4 boilers, IS4 camp o\ en*, 5 casks zinc, 05 bundles sheet iron, 1!)5 kegs nails, Crmckshank, Smart and Co , 11 packages hardware, 24 lengths galvanised pipe, 12 nests tubs, 6 American churns, 2 trucks, Newman and En en . IS6 packages medicine, I) andH Isaac3, f154 camp ovens, 44 hhds , 2 hhds hardware, P A Phillips , 12S bags sugar, 20 cheits candles, 110 boxes candles, 1 package and 1 box, order 15 cases furniture, 2 casks crockery, 1 package oilcloth, 4 cases colonial wine, D L Murdoch and Co , 20 caws merchandise, G Webster , 4 cases ironmongery, 8 cases furniture, order , 1 case drapeiy, J h. Joscclin , 455 boards of lumber, 333 pieces flooring, 148 doors, 149 cut dea's, A AVoolley and Co , 48 sacks and 337 bags potatoes, Richard Beamish , 400 bags biscuit, 221 packages merchandise, order —A "Woolley and Co , agents

yards, th» fortmait lUll standing. "• I helped them along th gaff and yards m ioou m possible, ■ At this timo the squall wai fearfully htavr, with wind and rain, and lightning vtry vivid, and bltttr cold. Tin cook was strong find active, but poor I/aws, tlit steward, very weak and dispirited, begging of us not to leave him. AYe told him we ware not going to, and it would Ml be right yet. The foremast thon came down on the port side with n crash, mid we were liftod bodily higher up The last chance was come— the chain cit-«toppor was hunting down fiom the bow, and as the' heavy sea recedod fiom the rocks the cook dropped down by tho stopper. Wo then passed poor Laws over tho bows to him and he got him in his arms, but ho seemed peifectly helpless I then attempted to go, but another feaifuf sea came over everything, tearing tht bows asunder, and carrying me right down in the middle of it. I got severely knockod about, and felt my left arm and leg nearly crashed, but hold on hard with tho right arm, as I had never let go tho cat-stopper. After recovering a bit I found I could do nothing but hold on as long as I could, tho bone of the left leg baie. I remained thus till about 4 a in. next morning, when I managed to crawl up the sund and rocks from tho small remaindor of the wreck, and got up out of the reach of the sea During this timo the g»lo, If anything, increased In violence. When daylight broke a fearful scone of wreck and ruin presontod itself, overything crushod up, and tho timbei high up on the rocks and beach. AVhen broad daylight came I found tho cook hanging to the rocks close to me. Ho told me poor Laws was washed out of his arms iu the last heavy sea, and himself knocked about greatly The mate and tho men came down tome, and a truly miserable appearance all had I then found Mr and Mrs Itankin (teachers of the National School, Lismoro) and Mr. Tester, passengeis , Jsllis, Elliott, G Phillips, Thomas Laws, and Mr. Hunter (chief engineer), weie Missing I told thorn (tho crew) I nas severely injured, and they must carry mo up a little higher As there was no food, nor any possibility of getting any, tho crew and mate then loft for Port Stephen*. The cook came to me, and told me he would stick by me till assistance came — this was Friday morning "Wo thon remained (tho cook and ni) self), without covering or any fire, on the beach till Sunday morning. AVhen I found neither of us could hold up much longer, tho cook started by himself foi Port Stephens to get assistance for me, and I remained by myself till 2pm on Monday, whou Mr Bunelland his son made theh appeaiance, hawng been attracted by part of tho wreck. They, in the kindest manner, put me on their horse, and t»ok me home , Mm Bramble finding me a dressing for my leg, which was very bad : and promised me to go out directly on the track of the cook. On coming down tho myal lakes into Port Stephens, in Mr Bramble's boat, \i e fell in with the Telegraph ketch , they had got the cook on board, and hart everything ready for a search for me in the morning We landed in the eveuing at Mr Mjers', about thirteen miles from Rajmond Terraco, who kindly entertained us, and drovo us on to the Terrace in time for the Collaioy On arriving at Newcastle, Captain Allen, the harbour master, told mo the crew had gone down to Sjdncy by the pievious day'-, boat, and immediately he heard from them about the wieck he had sent the Government steam tug Dorothy to Rock Bay in sonrch of us — I am, Ac, W. Pethsi, master of thestenmer Rainbow. Sydney, June 9.—" S. M. Iloiald," June 10

The flue clipper ship Columbus was to sail for Auckland on the Ist June, to follow the Mary Wan en Messis Brown and Campbell me hci agents The Alcxandia sailed for Tauianga last evening, with Commissauat stores and despatches She also took about 20 of the 6Sth Regiment The Sea Breeze sails foi Russell to day Iho steamer Wellington, Captain H B "Frnser, cleaicd last evening for Napier and the Southern ports The schooner Ceres, 91 tons, Captain Brown, arrived ) esterday from l'oi t Fairy, Victoria, whence she sailed on the 2nd lnstint She i:\peiiencod westeily winds and fine woathei for the hrst eight da) s , after which stiongSE gales pi ev ailed The Kings were sighted on Monday last She brings a cargo of 140 tons potatoes, 4 casks honey, 3 cises cheese The Sandily will sul for Tauianga today, with des patches, A.C The X C £> X Compam 'sss Claud Hamilton, left Sy dney at 1p to on the 4th instant , experienced strong southerly w mils, it lth a south east sea, on the coast of New South Wales Rounded Uabo Island ntl a m on the 6th instant, with stiong AV NAV and AV gales, which continued throughout the passage Passed Wilson's riomontorj at midnight on the 7th instant it then blowing a gale, the vessel undei leefed foie and aft canvas, and enteied Port Philip Heads at 0 30 am j esterday The Claud Hamilton is commanded by Captain Maclim, a gniitleman well known while commanding tin Royal mail steamship Euiopenn The Claud Hamilton will mn between this port and Nelson, in connexion with the company's fleet — "Melbourno Aigus," June 10 The steamer bouchay s left Sydney at 8 a m on the 4th instant , encountered strong winds from the S W , with heavy swell from the S U , till off the Diomedary, when the wind veeied to the west, with heavy gusts and showeis, increasing to a gale, which continued without liitermiss-on for tlnee daj» When about a mile to the "s AV of Wilson's Piomon tory, the coupling bolts of the propelling shaft t£i\ e waj Moit of the s ills having prev ionsly been split or blow n aw uv, Captain Pearce w ith great dilhcidty succeeded m wearing ship, and reached Refuge Co\e, where she was detained fouiteen hours repairing damages Arrived at Port Philip Heads at lpm yesterday, reaching tho Sandndge Piei at 430 p in — Ibid '1 he New Cattie Berth Newcastle —Preparations are in progress towards the formation of a more suitable berth for the shipment of cattle at this port, great complaints hawngbcen made against the pi esent one, and not without cause Tho (hedge has already been removed fiom the scene of her operations at the steamboat pier, in older to commence at the north east extremity of the Government AVliarf — the intended site of the new cattle shipping place, which will be completed with a > little delay as possible The Gov eminent, it is understood, propose erecting stock} ards and other facilities requisite foi the puipose, imposing a small charge per head on all cattle shipped, towards defraying the cost of making these necessaiy anangtmieuts It was time the lemoval of tins tratuc should take place, not only on account of the inconvenience and danger ati ending it, and the constant excitement to which the animals were exposed, but also on the ground of the nuisance cieated by the stockyard — "Newcastle Telegraph," June 11 The hiicd transport vessel Maxwell, having completed her cargo by taking m SO tons of powder from the floating magazine at Purfleet, sailed from the Thames on tho Oth instant, with shot, shell, rifled guns, and small arms for New Zealand — " Australian and New Zealand Gazette," April 7 SroRM \t Se v. —Loss op Ten Men — The barque Countess of Seafield, from London, bound to Canterbury, New Zealand, arnv ed at this port on Wednesday morning, in a most deplorable condition, having had ten men washed overboard, and lost her deck-houses, calley, bulwarks, companion hatch, wheel, binnacle, &c , in a heavy gale on the 27th of April, while in latitude 47 12 S , and longitude 78 K We giv» the following extracts from the log refening to this sad occurrence — "Thursday, April 27— Latitude 47 12 S, longitude 78 E, wind AV. to SAV , barometer 23 88 blowing a heavy gale, with furious squalls . a high cross sea on ship constantly flUing the decks with water, compelled to cut away the bulwarks to free the vessel Eight p m — Barometer rising '1 en p m — Blow ing furiously , kept the ship dead before the wind and sea Qtmter to twelve, pm — A terrific hurricane raging , pooped by a sea, which carried away the wheel, binnacle, companion hatch, stove in lha skvlight and half deck house, and disabled the chief oftitei Furled tho mainsail and fore topsail, and brought the ship to the wind, on the starboard tack, uudci close leefed main topsail Midnight — Barometer still rising , hurricane raging furiously April 28, half-past five a m —Swept by a s«a which earned away the house on deck and the mam iail Mr Squire olhcer 1 , Mr M'Lean (midshipman), H Farrow (cook), Edward Freeman, James Firby, R Sheriff, Thomas Burgess, AV Brand, (»ble seamen), Hugh Mandeville (apprentice), and Edward Earl (passenger), weie swept overboard and drowned 'Ihe new close-reefed main topsail blew to ribbons, tho foreiail, foretopsail, main trysail, mizen, and fore-topmast stays blew aw ay Cut the ribbons away from the yards, Arc Passeueers working both pumps, but unable to keep the ship free Six feet of water m the hold Eveiythinson dick blown oveiboard April2<) — Continuance of heav y gale Pumps constantly worked by passengers Captain, chief officer, carpenter, and crew caulking round the stanchions, i'c ,to endeavour to lessen the *k. Kept the ship to the north, m the hopes of fallmgin ith a vessel to render us assistance Ship making so much water, see no hope but to abandon hei May 1 — AVorked the pumps, ship making water, stood to the eastward to make a port for repaid, ifcc " Captain Uanvers reports that up to the time of this catastrophe he had experienced veiy fine weathei, and was m hopes of making a good passage The passengei who was drowned, Edward Bail, got up eaily on the morning of the 27th, saying, as the men had had a heavy night, and the cook had as much as ever he could do, he would get them some coffee road} Some of his fellow passengers tried to dissuade him, but he still peisisted, and lie went on deck, and was shortly after swept ovei board, at the same time as the othei men Another of the men was asleep in his bunk in the deckhouse, and he was swept over along with the house and all it contained . such was the force of the vvatei that the house fastenings, strong iron bolts, secured under the deck, were foicibly pulled right out, thus leaving holes through the deck, and allowing the water to rush into the hold. It was some time before tins was discovered, but immediately on the discovery being made the pumps were set to work, but wcie hardly able lo keep the vessel afloat till the damages could be lemedied Since this gale Captain Danveis repoits that he has experienced very fine weath»r, except on Friday last The Countess of Seafield has on board a quantity of ironwork for theiailway at Canterbury, and is otherwise heavily laden , and to this fact, we think, a good deal of the loss of life and damage to the vessel may be ascribed It is intended to place the vessel on one of the slips, and have her thoioughly repaired, after which she will proceed on her voyage to Cantcibury — " Hobart Town Advertiser "

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18640624.2.5.1

Bibliographic details

Daily Southern Cross, Daily Southern Cross, Volume XX, Issue 2162, 24 June 1864

Word Count
3,224

PORT OF. AUCKLAND. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XX, Issue 2162, 24 June 1864

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