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THE FALL OF MEREMERE.

The news of the abandonment of Meremere by the rebels, and its occupation by our troops, as published in our issue of yesterday, was far different in its aipoot than was, we believe, generally expected. The public mind had been wrought up to such a pitch of expectation, that the " Pall of Moromere" by the flight of the rebels did not satisfy it. Some unquestionable victory, calculated to strike terror into the hearts of the rebel chiefs, and which should be commensurate with the extensive preparations for the attack which had been going an far months, was what wag earnestly looked for ; and that the climax of it all should be the flight of the rebels just on the eve of the expeotod aocam* plishment of a great victory, formed the subject of general regret and disappointment amongst the citizens yesterday. "We do not pretend to judge of the value of the conquest here, but simply describe the feeling that was generally expressed on the intelligence of it being circulated through Auckland. There were fe\r, prqbably, who 4e n ie4 that it was a luocess, the more especially as the anticipated loss of life had been averted; but there were also few who did not expect that the success would have been of a more decided nature. Throughout the whole day the fall of Meremere was the general theme pf conversation ; and many wpre tho opinions expressed upon it ; but all, so far as we could learn, in the direction wo have hinted. Of course conversation turned upon the next move, on the board that was likely to be made ; and there being a pretty general belief that the natives had kept up the depeptiqn of their intention to make a stand at Meremero for- some ulterior purpose, that of attacking some of our outposts, rumours of fighting spread through the town with, great rapidity. Those for the most part were thoroughly without founda,#Qji ; although for the hour they formed a,n innocent subject of conversation, and caused, oft reppated itemarks of, " I wonder if it's true." " Fighting at Bangiriri,"i "An onslaught upon the Wairoa," and "A marauding party in the neighbourhood of Onehunga," were about some of the most prominent rumours that wero circulated. Of course it was very reasonable to antipipate that from the direction the rebels, took on leaving Meremor* they might poss.ib.Jy try their strength on s,ome of aur qutposts j and Wairoa, being i» a Ijkply spot far that, its name wa.s frequently brought up. The 'Miranda' getting np ateam, and some of the Naval Brigade preparing to leave in the ' Sandfly for

that direction, gave of course firmness to /the belief that.danger was expected there. About two o'clock an interesting sight took place in the Albert Barrack-squaro, the Second Class Militiamen having assembled thero preparatory to a start for the front. Of course on such a momentous occasion they wore not allowed to depart without some demonstration; and besides the general spectators there was a crowd of " better halves " bdnt upon saying adieu to their husbands, whose mission might be a perilous one for aught they knew. It was a pleasing feature of the gathering to see how good-humouredly oui\citizen soldiers left their I occupations and their homes to assist in the determined effort now being made once for all to subdue Maoridom. We believe it is the belief that this is to be the lnst Maori war which is to disturb the peace and happiness of this lond that causes this willingness to assist in the work. Cheered lustily by the admiring crowd, the 200 militiamen passed out of Auckland through Parnell, headed by the volunteer band, the music from which must havo imparted life to any faltering spirits amongst them, if there were such. After all, there is on reflection great reason to bo thankful that a success, whatover may be its value, which will only bo made apparent by subsequent events, has been achieved M'ithout the loss of a single life. It was this consoling element of tho affair, wo believe, which made many yesterday curb their feelings of disappointment, and look upon the " Fall of Meremere," if not as a great victory, as a valuable conquest.

The Governor.— His Excellency, Sir George Groy, proceeded to Drury to-day on hi» way to the Front. Ivlereiiere. — A detailed nariative o£ tbe capture of Mereiuere, from our Special Correspondent will appear in our next. Pakliamentaky.— The House of Representatives will meet to-day at twelve o'clock noon, when, it is presumed Mr. Fox will make* a statement of the policy of the Government, after which the debate on the reply to the address will be proceeded with. The Legislative Council met yesterday. Mr. Whitaker announced the formation of the new Ministry, and that it was his intention to make a statement on the following day of what measures it was the intention of the Government to introduce during the Session, intimating at the same time that he thought the Session might be concluded by the 24th of this month. The address in reply to His Excellency's speech was adopted, and the House adjourned until the following (this) day. The 'Sandfly.' — The colonial gunboat 'Sundfly,' Captain Marks, returned to harbour yesterday moining, from her trip to the Wairon. She left the Queenstreet wharf at about ten o'clock on Saturday night, with provisions on board for Wairoa, and steamed alongside the cutter ' Eclair,' to give orders to the men in charge. She remained at anchor for half an hour, and proceeded on her way. On Sunday morning, at 3 a.m. «he brought up in the Wapokia, nnd landed the passengers of the 'Eclair,' two men, one woman, and a boy. She afterwards hove up and went on to tho Wairoa, bringing-up under the heads at 4-30 %.m. At 8 a.m. she (teamed towards the creek, but not being able to get up from the insufficiency of water. Captain Marks, with the boat's crew, went up the creek, all being well armed ; and returned with the native chief Jonathan, to act as pilot. Captain Marks again attempted to get up the creek, but there was not enough water, and she grounded. The boat (taken for that purpose) was then loaded, and towed up tho creek. The Captain came back with Jonathan and the boat's crew at 6-30 p. in , and steamed back to the heads and brought up for the night. She steamed away at about 8 o'clock jesterday morning aud came up along side the hulk to take in coal. She took her departure yesterday for the Wniroa. New Zealand Gazette. — A Now Zealand Gazette was published on Saturday, of which we make the following abstract : — There is a proclamation declaring that the following persons have been brought within the operation of the Naturalisation Act : Joseph Sousa, mariner, of Dunedin ; f August Friedrich, settler, of Wellington, and his wife and family ; Theodore Neumann, settler, of Wellington, and- bis wife and family. There are'some despatches with regard to the Maultu engagements, which will be found in another column. A circular from London, from Charles Nicholson and R. G. Mncdonnell, on the pioposed national Shakespcaie memorial is published for general information. His Excellency the Governor has appointed Francis Eastwood Campbell, Esq., and Charles Chamberlain, Esq., both of Auckland ; and Joseph Henry Levieu, Esq., of Nelson, to be Justices of the Peace for tho colony of New Zeolaud. A despatch from the General Poat-office, London, announcing that on and after tho Ist of September last, the postage upon letters conveyed between the United Kingdom and Hayti, Wesb Indies would be increased fiom Cd. to Is. the half ounce, is published for general information. A return is published of the quantity of gold exported from New Zealand from the Ist A pril, 1857, to the 30th Sept. 1563. The totals are as follow. Auckland, 5,832 ozs., value, £18,601. Nelson, 59,080 ozs.; value, £228,933. Dunedin, 1,065,851 ozs. ; value, £4,103,174 Grand totals: 1,130,763 025.; value, £4,377,708. New bonding warehouses at Ly ttleton and Wellington are declared as approved of and appointed under the Customs Regulation Act. It is announced that a certificate of incorporation has been issued to the Dunedin Water supply Company. A table of alteration of postage, via Marseilles, is published ; also a time table of the extended service of the b.s. ' Prince Alfred ' from Sydney te Auckland. Auckland Annual Races. — Entries for tho Auckland Jockey Club Plate, to bo run for on the 2nd January, 1864 : — Mr. Elliotts Rattan, by Sweetmeat, dam Coquette, 6 years ; Mr. Elliotb names Mr. Redwood, junr.'sLady Bird, by 111 Barbieira, dam, Moth, 5 years ; Mr. Rogers's grey gelding Sam Slick, aged ; Captain Walmsley's chesnut horse Maori Chief, by Pacifio, dam, Moonshine, 4 years ; Mr. King's chesnut gelding BuUeifly, aged ; Mr. Macfarlane's brown gelding KoherQa, by Meleager, dam, Gazelle, 3 years ; Lieutanant St. Hill's bay mare Siren, by Glendon, dam Althiea, 5 years ; Mr. Wild names brown mare Brunette, by Touchit, dam, Princess, aged ; Mr. Wild names bay gelding Gairotter, by Pacific, dam, Grizette, 3 years. RoBBKRY from THE TiLii. — About 5 o'clock last evening, the sum of ninepence was stolen from the till in tho shop ot Mr. Gilberd, painter, &c. , Shortlanditreefc, by thiee younc lads named Robinson and MoMahon. Fottunately, a few minutes before the robbery, Mr. Gilberd had eniplied the till of its contents, with tho exception of the small amount above mentioned, otherwise the loss might liavo been serious. The money was stolen in the following manner : Robiusou crept round to the baok of the oounter, whilst the two MqMahans (cousins), kept watch. When Robinson wm leaving the shop, he was notiotd by Mr. Gilbert's boy, and Mr. Gilberd pursued him, but when the young thief was captured, no money was found upon him. After being detained a short time, he wm liberated, and he then proceeded to the neighbourhood of the post-office, where he took up the money which he had secretly "planted." It was divided amongst the lads — threepence each — and they spent It in sweetmeats. The police afterwards became acquainted with the facts of tho case, and the three lads wore apprehended, when they at onoe acknowledged their oompHclty, Robinson, though quite a young lad, is an aid offender, having assisted Jamieson in the robbing at Mr. Drury'i shop, in Queen-street, when the money was adstracted from the till in a similar manner. Blockade. — It will be seen by unofficial announcement in our advertising columns that until further notice the whole coast between Maraltal Point and Kanaeranga (at the mouth of the Thames) will be gtriotly blockaded, and that all vessels, boats, or canoes, whether belonging to Europeans or natives, which shall be found conveying arms, powder, or other warlike stores, will be seized, and the persons on bpa.rd detained in custody. St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church.— The induction of the Rev. Mr. Hill into the collegiate charge ftf St. Andrew's, as a colleague of the Rev. Mr. Bruce, is to take place this morning in tho church, at 11 o'clock, and a fruit soiree will be held in the evening, in celebration of the event, We have no doubt but that the congregation and friends will attend 10 interesting a re-unlon, A PpraEß Spine.— Captain Porter brought information, yesterday of a outter having been seen sunk, in a line with his house at Waiparara and the peak of Rangitoto, the top of the mast-head and the peak of the mainsail being .visible at low water. It is feared that some lives may have been lost i nt oH events the circumstances would be wor^h, investigation by the proper authorities. Since writing the above, we hear that tho captain of the ' Annie Laurie reports having teen the mast of the cutter in question about two feet out of the water. TflNDmis »ob Commissariat Buildings. _ The Peputy Commissary General invites tenders until noon of Tuesday next, for the erection of several buildings fou the Commissariat Service, particulars of , which will bo seen in advertisement. The men engaged in tho contmot will be exempt ironi militia duty.

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THE FALL OF MEREMERE., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIX, Issue 1965, 3 November 1863

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THE FALL OF MEREMERE. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIX, Issue 1965, 3 November 1863

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