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WELLINGTON versus AUCKLAND.

After a lapse of nearly two years, the second interprovincial cncket match between a selected Eleven of the piovince of Wellington and a selected team of this piovince, came off on Satmday list, at E]-soiu In cricketing circles thf anticipated contest had for some time pa'-t been tlie all-absoi bing toj>ic of consideration. Among the Aucklandeis theie was a spirit of confidence which their success in the first match, which was played at Wellington, accounted for ; whilst among their antagonists, if such a wonl may be used for their friendly livnls in the cricket field, a spirit of confidence had likewise grown up, fiom then piactice. For some time considerable unceitiunty e\jsted, lelativo to the probability of the cucketers. nf Auckland meeting their opponents this season. All hope of such a pleasure had almost faded when a few of tho more energetic of the Welhngtomans set themselves eai neatly to the task of bringing it about ; and, l>y theii e\eitionB a return match was arranged to be played at Auckland. No ceitain time was appointed, and this was felt to be a drawback. The fiist hint of the tune was received but a few days ago, uhen a letter of the Wellington Cricket Club informed the cricketeis of this province that by the ' Storm Bird ' the Wellington team would take their departure to piny the return match at Auckland , the first thought then of our cricketers was not "let us practice and be prepared to beat them," but " lot us give them a fitting reception, — an Auckland welcome." An active and painstaking committtee were at once appointed, to whom weie entiusted all the arrangements for the pioper reception of the visiting cricketers and also for the Dairying out of the match in the most advantageous and convenient way. On Thursday the ' Storm Bird ' was expected, and had she arrived the match would have been played on the following day, but it was not until Friday morning that the steamer came into the Manukau, bringing with her the Wellington Eleven, and certainly they met a hearty welcome Then it was detei mined that the match should be played on the ground opposite the Junction Hotel, Epsom, on Saturday morning. High weie the hopes of both parties when the morning dawned — each in their own hearts w ere confident of success ; Clapshaws weie handled with an easy and most admirable grace, and at half past nine o'clock to the convincing ground both teams took their way. The morning was all that could be desired — it was fresh and cool — a slight and pleasant breeze was blowing which could in no way affect either the batsmen or the bowler. Light clouds floated in the air, preserving the players and spectator from the inconvenience of; a hot sun. The number of spectators upon the ground at any given pel iod, weie compaiatively few; for which circumstance many reasons might he assigned The clay fixed upon— Saturday, was an inconvenient one to tradesmen and shopkeepcis, and as the English mail closed on the same day, the merchants and many others could not be present. Although every possible publicity had been given of the match, the time intervening between the ariival of the Wellington men until the match was commenced, was so limited, that very many were not aware that Buch a thing as an interprovincial cricket match was going on. The Newmarket ground is the best the cricketers have, at piesent; but it is too distant fiom the city for the general public to attend the matches played there. Thus, with so many counteracting influences, it was not to be wondered that only a few of the most ardent cricketers, or admirers of cricket, were present dm ing the early part of the gamo. However, as the day wore on, the spectators became more numerous, and towards its close there were about 300 on the ground That we have not more cricketers amongst us, cannot but be a matter of regret to all lovers of a really manly, fair, and healthy game. It is a game founded on fairness, and in which deception cannot be practiced ; and it imparts to its devotees a love of fair play which usually characterise them through life. A good cricketer will always be found & good citizen ; and all who have played the game know full well how very healthy an exercise it is, and how manly a feeling is experienced when protecting their wicket with the willow. It is a wonder, therefore, that the game has not received greater encouragement from the members of this community. At half pa^t nine o'clock the two teams appeared upon the convincing ground, the Wellingtonians determined to win back the laurels they lost in fust contest, and our cricketers equally determined to preserve them, and add to them another victory. Some doubts were entertained that our men had not had sufficient practice to cope with their opponents ; but these doubts the result of the match proved to be unfounded ; or, rather, the veiy commencement of it dispelled, as it was plain to see the victory lay with Auckland, and that very little practice was required by our men to vanquish the men they were pitted against. The Wellington team consisted of Messrs. L. Buck, (Captain), T. Bould, G. Bolton, C. Borlase, G Brewer W. Brewer, T. V Harvey, G. Phillips, A. Ramsay, J. Eoots, and N. Valentine ; W. Bromley, umpire. The Eleven selected to represent this province were : Messrs. Lanklmm, (Captain), Simpson, Sim c ox, Alpe, Russell, Wilson, Campbell, Stedman, J. Rayner, A. Rayner, and Kissling ; Captain Lyon, umpire, and Mr. H. D. Fenton, scorer, The choice of innings fell to the Auckland side. At ten o'clock the wickets were pitched, and the Captain of the Wellington team having placed his men in the field, Simpson and Simcox were sent in first, W. Brewer and Buck bowling to them. Simpson made a good hit for two runs, shortly after which, a good ball from Brewer got amongst his stumps, and he retired with a scoie of two. Lankham assumed the place at the vacant wicket, and had commenced some very nice play, when, having made a score of 3. he also was forced to retiie, being caught out by Bolton, off a ball from Brewer. Russell went in, and after a short innings was stumped by Valentine. The decibion of the umpire in giving Rusiell out was protested against, and to the spectator! it appeared * very jnsfc protest. Simcox kept scoring steadily, singles and, twos. S,teadman succeeded Russell, and began play \ery well, after making 2 singles he, made a fine hit to field on, for which 6 were added to his score. lie went on .scoring steadily, until at last he was given out for leg before, wicket, with 14 runs. Simcox was run out when his score reoohed 25, Wilson and Alpe shortly after faced each other, the former was bowled by Buck without troubling the scorers, and was succeeded by J. Rayner. Alpe's inning's wm a nhort one j after scoring a single and a two-er he was

AUCKLAND FIRST INNINGS. SFCOND INNINGS. L Simpson, bW. Brewer . . 2 b. Brower . . . . 3 Sitiicox, run out . 25 o Bolton, b Buck . . 0 Lankham, o Bolton, b Brewer 3 c. Phillips, b. Brower 80 Russell, it. Valontlno, b. Browor G c Rummy, b Browtr 0 Stedman, 1 b w., b. Brewer 14 1 b w., b. Brower . 1 Wilson, 1b w , b Buck . 0 b. Buck . . . 2 Alpe, b Brower . .8b Buck „ 7 J Ruyner, c Bould, b. Buck 3 b Brewer . . . . C T. Kusling, not out . . . . 14 b Brewer . . . . 1 A. Rayner, b Brewer . . 3 1b w , b Brew er . . 0 Campbell, b Brower, . . . . 0 not 0ut. ... 6 Widcs, G , byes, 4; l:byes,l .10 1. byo, l;w balls, 8 9 82 70 Grand total, 152. WELLINGTON. FIRST INNINGS. SECOND INNINGS. Phillip*, c. Rusiell, b Xankham 1 run out . . . . 1 T. Bould, b. Rimell . . 1 b Russell .. .. i A. Ranuay, c Stedman, b Russell 2 o. Raynor, b. Stodman 0 J Roots, run out 1 b. Rmioll . . . 0 L Buck, b. Russell . .2 b. Rusioll . . . . 0 O Bolton, b. Innkbam . . ..3b. Stedman . . . 1 T Harvey, b Russell . 4 c and b. Stedman . 1 C. Borlaio, run out . . . . 1 b Lankhnm . . . . 0 N. Valentine, b. Ruisell ..Ob. Russell . . . . 8 W. Brewer, b. Lankham .. 0 c Alpo, b, Stedman .. 1 Q Browor, not out .. ..0 not out 0 Widei,2; byes, S .. ..7 byo», i ; wide ball, 1 6 22 22 Grand total, 44 .Thus the Auckland cricketers won by 108 runs, and with them for the present rest the laurel* and they well deserved them. Whilst the Auckland men were taking their second innings, the very excellent band of the 40th Kegiment, under the direction of Sergeant O. Murrell, arrived upon the ground, and during the remainder of the day, they performed with their accustomed ability, the several pieces in the following programme : — Grand Exhibition Maroh, Auber ; Selection, 'Op Martha, ' Flotow ; Waltz, ' Violante/ D'Albert ; Galop, ' Great Excitement,' Laroche ; March, ' Axevalla,' Damtrom ; Waltz, ' Der Mongenstorn,' Labitzky ; Polka, ' Egyptian,'Laurent; Galop, ' Burlesque,' Cussidy. When the match terminated cheers were given for victors and tha vanquished, and the assembly dispersed, some to prepare themselves for the dinner in the evening,

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Bibliographic details

WELLINGTON versus AUCKLAND., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVIII, Issue 1700, 31 December 1862

Word Count
1,554

WELLINGTON versus AUCKLAND. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVIII, Issue 1700, 31 December 1862

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