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NOTICES OF MOTION.

The Speaker of the Provincial Council has thrown himself openly into partizanship. He has gone so far in excess of his powers as even to fefuse a notice of motion, which would have been disagreeable to one of his party. What is the use of standing orders, if they are to be broken through at pleasure by the very officer appointed to enforce them. It is upon the standing orders that* minority relies for protection ; abrogate the orders, and a minority is immediately deprived of even that fair share of influence which it is otherwise enabled to exercise. Though a minority must be beaten in the long run.in a well conducted Assembly, it cannot be overwhelmed at once. The position of a minority is well put by May :—: — The forms of the House can ultimately assist neither party ; but, so far as they offer any intermediate advantage, the minority have the greatest protection in forms, while the majority are met by obstructions to their will. It appears that the Chairman of the late City Council, upon whorr a vote of censure has recently been passed, was of opinion that other members were as justly liable to censure as himself. Accordingly, he puts in notice of his intention to cause inquiry into the conduct of the Provincial Law Officer, in reference to a matter baa obtained considerable, _npjtpriety ? but which we have hi.herto refrained from -noticing,' being unwilling to prejudge what may yet form a subject for after proceedings. The Speaker, in defiance of all rule, refused to receive the notice, thus quashing the proceeding in cunis. He had allowed enquiry concerning the Chairman and Treasurer of the City Council, but refuses to allow it in regard to any one else. This -was no question for him to settle. At all events, the notice of motion ought to be have been re-, ceived, and the notice itself disposed of in due course, by the Provincial Council. If the motion were vexatious, or unsupported by fact, it would have been thrown out, and the mover left in a worse condition than before. It may be said that the Council is not the proper tribunal for the alleged offence. Possibly not ; but the right to try this, is at least as good as was the right to try Mr. Lee's case. Our own opinion is, that the Council is incompetent to sit in judgment upon either one or the other. It is idle to call that a Court which is powerless to enforce its judgments or decisions. But the Council unquestionably has a right to institute enquiry into the public conduct of any of its members, and to record opinions thereon. 000 I

By the General Government Gazette, we are informed that the Hon. Colonel Robert Henry Wynyard, C. 8., commanding the forces in New Zealand, The Hon. George Alfred Arney, Chief Justice of New Zealand, The Hon George Cutfield, Esq., of New Plymouth, and the Hod. James Menzies, Esq , of Mataura, have been summoned by His Excellency the Governor to the Legislative Council of New Zealand. Also, that his Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Frederick Aloysius Weld, Esq., of Flaxbourne, James Stuart Wortley, Esq., commonly called the Honourable James Stuart Wortley, of Christchurch, ! to be Justices of tbe Peace for the Colony of New ZealandJohn Webster, Esq., of Hokianga, Henry Williams, Esq., of Paihia, 4o be Justices of the Peace for the Province of Auckland. Major John Yeeden Lloyd, to be a Justice of the Peace for the Province of New Plymouth James Burne Fetgnson, Esq., of Waipureka, to be a Justice of the Peace for the Province of Wellington John Charles Watts Russell, of Ham, John Swger Gundry, Esq., of byttelton, Crosbie WarJ, Esq., of Lyttelton. Robert Latter, Esq., of Lyttelton, to be Justices of the Peace for the Province of Canterbury. . William Henry Cutten, Esq., of Dunedin, William Henry Teshmaker, Esq., of the Waitangi, Alexander McMaster, Esq., of the Waitangi, Francis Wallace Mackenzie, Esq , of Murihiku, Gordon Rich, Esq , of Murihiku, Walter Henry Pearson, Esq., of Invercargill, to be Justices of the Peace for the Province of Otago.

The estimated net quantity of Gold Dusk exported from New Zealand from the 9th April, 1857, to the 31st December, 1857, is 10,436 oz , 13 dwts , 22 grains. * ■. The estimated value is £40,443, 5.7. . Besides a considerable quantity exported priYately, which cannot be ascertained- *

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18580223.2.14

Bibliographic details

NOTICES OF MOTION., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XV, Issue 1112, 23 February 1858

Word Count
738

NOTICES OF MOTION. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XV, Issue 1112, 23 February 1858

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