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UNITED STATES TREATY WITH JAPAN AN ACCOUNT OF COMMODORE PERRY'S SECOND VISIT TO JAPAN.

From the Overland Register, August 6. "We are indebted to some kind unknown correspondent for the following interesting account of the last visit of the United States squadron to Japan, under command of Commodore Perry. Rendezvousing at Lew-chew, the squadron, with the exception of one or two vessels still upon the Coast of China, sailed for Yedo Bay in the early part of February. Arriving simultaneously off the mouth of the Bay, the steamers took the sailing vessels in tow, and against a stiff headwind stood up and came to anchor some distance above the city of Uraga, which is the Port of entry for vessels trading to Yedo. After welcoming the squadron back to Japan, the Japanese endeavoured to persuade the Commodore to return to Uraga to meet the Commissioners appointed by the Emperor to confer with him, but as the anchorage at that place is too much exposed for a large squadron in the winter season, the Commodore objected, and desired that the interviews should take place near where the vessels then lay. For some reason or other however, the Japanese declined to fall into this arrangement, and adhered with such obstinacy to their first proposition, that after several days delay, the Commodore, losing all patience, got under weigh with the squadron, and ran some twelve miles further up the Bay, in the direction of Yedo, and within hearing of the bells of that city. This movement had the desired effect, and the Japanese, fearing no doubt a still nearer approach to the capital, proposed that negotiations should be carried on at any spot the Commodore might select in the neighbourhood of the squardron. The village of Yokuhama being chosen as a suitable place in all respects, buildings were erected with all despatch by the Japanese, and the first interview took place on the Bth of March, when a courteous and friendly communication from the Emperor to the President of the United States was delivered by the five Commissioners appointed for that purpose, and aKo to discuss any propositions that the Commodore might have to make. The most friendly disposition was manifested by both parties, and negotiations began under favourable auspices, which continued uninterrupted to their conclusion on the 31st of March, when a Treaty of Amity and Intercourse between the United States and Japan was signed by the Commodore and the Commissioners as Plenipotentiaries of their respective Governments. After the conclusion of the Treaty and interchanges of hospitality, the Squadron sailed for Simoda, one of the two ports opened to the citizens of the U. States. The Fleet Captain, Capt. Adams, was despatched to Washington with the Treaty on the oth of April, and took passage in the Saratoga as far as the West Coast of America. A careful survey of the harbor of Simoda being made, and most of the stipulations of the Treaty being put m practical operation, the Commodore sailed for Hakodadi, where he arrived about the middle of May. - This is one of the most magnificent Bays and harbors in the World; and capableof holding all the Fleets of the Pacific in security. The Commodore's object in visiting Hakodadi was the same as at Simoda. In addition to the survey of the harbor however, a vessel was sent to examine "Volcano Bay," another to the Island of Fatsisio which is the Penal Colony of Japan for Political offenders, and another down the Japan Sea to Shanghae. The mountains in the vicinity of Hakodadi abound with Bears, deer, and small game, and the Bay furnishes delicious Salmon and shell fish in the greatest abunbance. There is a spring near the town, the water of which is strongly impregnated with Sulphur, and is supposed to be highly medicinal. Hakodadi is the second City in size en the Island of Yesso, and probably the" first in commerce. Junks in great numbers were constantly arriving and departing, whilst the squadi'on was there, and at no time were there less than one hundred at anchor in the port, yet the authorities said there numbers were always greatly increased during the summer months. On the return of the Squadron to Simoda, the Commissioners were already there awaiting the arrival of the Commodore. The place had become an Imperial City, and the Prince of Mimasaki and the Prince of Suruga had been appointed its Governors. The good feeling which had subsisted between the Americans and Japanese since the arrival of the Squadron seemed to be increased by a more intimate acquaintance, and the Squadron sailed on the 25th June with the best wishes of the Commissioners and inhabitants, and expressions of a hope of soon seeing them again in Japan. Stopping at Lew-chew for a short time the Commodore and Regent of the Island established some regulations for the benefit and protection of American vessels touching at the Ports of the Kingdom. The Squadron left Lew-chew on the 17th Instant. (June, 1854.) J

' JAPAN EXPEDITION PRESS. U. S. Steam Frigate Mississippi, at sea, July 17, 1654. Compact between the United States and the Kingdom of Lexo Chew, signed at Napa, Great Leto Chew, the Wth day of July, 1854. Ilereafter, whenever citizens of the United States come to Lew Chew, they shall be treated with great „ courtesy and friendship. Whatever articles these persons ask for, whether from the officers or people, which, the country can furnis.h, shall be sold to them ; not shall the authorities interpose any prohibitory regulations to the people selling ; and whatever either party may wish to buy, shall be exchanged at reasonable prices. *" Whenever ships of the United States shall come into any harbour in Lew Chew, they shall be supplied with wood and water at reasonable prices ; but if they wish to get other articles, they shall be purchased only at Napa. If ships of the United States are wrecked on Great Lew Chew, or on Islands under the jurisdiction of* the Royal Government of Lew Chew, the local authorities shall dispatch persons to assist in saving life and property and preserve what can be brought ashore till the ships of that Nation shall come to takeaway all that may have been saved: and the expenses incurred in rescuing these unfortunate persons, shall be refunded by the Nation they belong to. "Whenever persons from ships of the United States come ashore in Lew Chew, they shall be at liberty to ramble where they please, without hindrance, or having officials sent to follow them, or to spy what they do ; but if they violently go into houses, or triflle with women, or force people to sell them things, or do other such like illegal acts, they shall be arrested by the local officers, but not maltreated, and shall be reported to the Captain- of the ship to which they belong for punishment by him. At Tumai is a burial ground for the" citizens of the United States, where their graves and tombs shall not be molested. The Government of Lew Chew shall appoint skillful pilots who shall be on the lookout for ships appearing off the Island, and if one is seen coming towards Napan, they shall go out in good boats beyond the reefs to conduct her in to a secure anchorage, for which service the Captain shall pay to the pilot Five Dollars ; and the same for going out of the harbour beyond the reefs. Whenever ships anchor at Napa, the local authorities shall furnish them with wood at the rate of three thousand six hundred copper cash per thousand catties ; and with water at the rate of six hundred copper ca*h, (43 cents) for one thousand catties, or six bairels full, each containing 30 American gallons. Signed in the English and Chinese language by Commodore Mathew C. Perry, Commander-m-chief of the U. S. Naval Forces in the East India, China, and Japan Seas, and especial envoy to Japan, for the United States ; and by Sha Fu Fing, Superintendent of Affairs, (Tsu-li-kwou) in Lew Chew, and Ba Rio Si, Treasurer of Lew Chew at Shui, for the Government of Lew Chew, and copies exchanged this llth day of July, 1854, or the reign Hien fung, 4th year, 6th moon, 17th day, at the Town Hall of Napa.

The 'Gardiners' Chronicle,' recommends the cultivation of nettles and mallows, for the purpose of furnishing material for the paper makers. The Alphides in Beans — An insect attack of much consequence is one before which a whole bean crop of a district will sometimes be sacrificed ; and it most frequently happens, if the weather is very changeable, especia ly from dry to wet, and dry again sets in, there is almost certain to be a visitation of alubides. — These usually appear in June, and stick to the necks of the top-shoots, sucking out all the juices; and though a few may appear at first, they soou spread, not by millions, but by myriads as countless as the motes in a sunbeam ; and to complete the whole a week after the attack the crawling wingless lice are succeeded by winged flics — the same as the miscalled cholera flics of September last, which were in fact the alphides of the turnip. Those on the beans are easily observable, being not green like other plant-lice, and so hidden from observation by their colour so nearly resembling the plant they feed upon ; but of a black colour, and have hence got the name of "collier" — but are more frequently called "dolphin" or smoother fly. Now for these there are but one remedy. They breed with the rapidity of the wildest flight of the imagination, but can only feed on the recently grown and tender parts, being so delicate that the suckers cannot penetrate into any very solid part of the plant. The farmer must at once cut off all the infested heads, though they may be onty an inch above the flowers, and though the flowers left may be few; this amputation must be relentlessly and asoiduously performed upon the whole ciop, while the insects are in the aperous or wingless state ; for if they attain the dipterous, they ascend the plant far more easily, and may still do some injury to thefrecent sideshoots. In 1833, the bean crops in the north of England suffered just as much or more from these as in 1544 from the weevil.

A Hundred Years Hence. — A writer in an English publication, iv speculating upon the condition of the world a hundred years hence, sajs; — There are in the world this year not less than sixty millions of Anglo-Saxons. Now, as thoy are doubled iv number in half a ceniury, in 1952 they will have swelled to the enormous amount of "two hundred and forty millions! Two hundred and forty millions of human beings, all speaking one language, borrowing inspiration from one literature, contributing equally to the store-house of science, animated by kindred sentiments, worshipping at the same shrine, and all and each of them indefatigably contributing to the fulfilment of the mission specially given to the race, to renovate, consolidate, enlighten, strengthen and Christianize the sons and daughters of Adam, so that in the appointed time they would be indeed the sons and daughters of the bright and heavenly morning ! What a prodigious family ! The mind staggers under the baro conception of its magnificence, and we pause to glance at some of its coming incidents in their sober entirety. Upon a moderate computation one hundred and fifty millions of this population will be located on the continent of America. A vast poportion of it will be a maritime population, situated on the shores of the Pacific, where Liverpool and New York will send out their ships to trade with the Islands of the Pacific Ocean, with Australia and New Zealand, and further westward, with Japan, China, Burma!), India, and even Persia althoug it may be a Russian province. From the promises of a future which have already peered over the horizon it is quite manifest that the British and AngloSaxons in America, and our present Australian group of Colonies will be lords of the seas in the Southern world. Iv the Physical regions created and controlled by man there will uudoubtly be many stupendous revelations. In travelling, whether by land or by water, the people of that day will call us slow as we called those who lived a century ago slow. The voyage to New York will probably be effected in two days ; "to India and Australia in eleven ; which would be just at the rate of about sixty miles an hour — the pres ent speed attainable on a railway.

The Horse Artillery and Homoeopathy — A troop of the horse artillery, with some guns, arrived iv Leicester on Monday, from Leeds en route to Woolwich. The horses belonging to the troop are treated for all their diseases according to the homoeopathic system of medicine. The men of the troop are.all under the same system, as well as many others of the regiment. — Leicester Chronicle*

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UNITED STATES TREATY WITH JAPAN AN ACCOUNT OF COMMODORE PERRY'S SECOND VISIT TO JAPAN., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XI, Issue 759, 6 October 1854

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UNITED STATES TREATY WITH JAPAN AN ACCOUNT OF COMMODORE PERRY'S SECOND VISIT TO JAPAN. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XI, Issue 759, 6 October 1854

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