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THE SOUTHERN CROSS. Friday, May 26, 1854.

LUCEO NON TJRO. "If I have been extinguished, yet there rise A thousand beacons Irom the spark I bore."

Wednesday last, was a day of iinusual interest to the inhabitants of Auckland ; for, independently of its being the anniversary of the Birthday of our gracious Sovereign, it was likewise the day appointed for the first meeting, in General Assembly, of the various Representatives of all the Provinces of New Zealand. The weather proved to be singularly unpropitious; continuous and heavy showers of rain descending with but little intermission, throughout the day. The ships in harbour, as usual, were " dressed" in their gayest bunting,— the Government Brig ' Victoria,' Captain Deck, being magnificently decorated, fore and aft, from her trucks to her water line. There was but one exception to the parti-coloured rule, and that, through what cause we cannot imagine, was the only London ship, at present, here At noon, one and twenty guns were duly discharged at Point Britomart ; and these were followed by a feu dejoie loyally delivered by the 58th Regt., i in the Albert Barrack Square. The members of both Houses of the General I Assembly met at noon in their respective Chambers, for the purpose of taking their oaths of allegiance. In the House of Representatives, a discussion aroS e ; — Hugh Carleton, Esq., in the Chair, as , father of the house — (first elected member in New Zealand) with respect to the propriety of an adjournment, after the members should have been sworn in, until Friday, at 11 a m., to afford time to the members to determine on the most fitting person to elect to the oflice of Speaker. Messrs Lee, O'Neill, Forsaith, and others, were in favour of an immediate election Messrs. Rhodes, Porter, and several of the Southern members advocated j postponement. Whilst the discussion was going on, intimation was given to the members of the House of Representatives that the Judge was in attendance (in the other Chamber) to administer the oaths. The Representatives, however, were of opinion that the proper course, and that which was most consistent with their dignity, was to take the oaths in their own chamber. Jn con- ! formity with this determination, His Honor presented himself, stating that having understood it to be their wish, he had attended, although there would have been much more convenience had they consented to be sworn in the Chamber below, on account of fiome members not being present. \ It was stated in reply, that there would be no | difficulty whatever in sending for the other niemj bers. The oaths were then administered. The members having been sworn in, the private meeting (Mr. Carleton in the Chair) re- | sumed its deliberations, which terminated in the adoption of the following motion, which was proposed by Mr. Rhodes and seconded by Mr. Cutten : — That a deputation from this private meeting of the members of the House of Representatives do -wait upon his Excellency the Officer Administering the OrOTemment, for the purpose of respectfully representing to his Excellency the hope of the Meetiug that it may suit the convenience of his Excellency to postpone until Friday next the opening of the General Assembly. A deputation of the following gentlemen was then appointed to wait upon His Excellency, with the resolution :— Messrs. Carleton, Cutten, Rhodes, Greenwood, Porter, Bartley, Clifford, and O'Neill. Upon the return of this deputation, Mr. Carleton j announced that his Excellency had been pleased i to state in answer to the deputation^ that whenover it should be announced to him that the House had elected its Speaker, he would be prepared to read his speech and open the Assembly. Mr. Carleton then left the Chair, and declared the Private Meeting dissolved. It was then moved by Mr. Revans and seconded by Dr. Lee that the meeting be now convened as the House of Representatives, and that Mr. Carleton do take the Chair. The motion having been carried unanimously, the Chairman read the proclamation summoning the General Assembly. Mr. Revans, seconded by Mr. Rhodes^ then moved that the House proceed to the election of its Speaker. Mr. O'Neill spoke in favour of immediate election. Mr Forsaith contended that the House would stultify itself by such a course. They had sent a deputation to his Excellency for the purpose of obtaining his assent to a postponement of their election, and, when that assent had been given, how could they consistently proceed ? Mr. MacAndrew, seconded by Mr. Merriman, moved as an amendment that the House do now adjourn, until Friday next, at llr o'clock, for the election of a Speaker. The amendment having been put and carried, the House adjourned accordingly. At 2 p.m. his Excellency the Officer Administering the Government held a levee at the Assembly House. A guard of honour of the 58th regiment, under the command of Captain Cooper, with the Band and Queen's Colour, was in attendance to receive his Excellency. The presentations were numerous; but, not having been furnished with the list, we are unable to publish the names.

The intelligence from Europe received by the Yarrow, — and for the possession of which, we are mainly indebted to the considerate attention of Captain Kemp, — is of an exceedingly important character. It supplies us with her Majesty's | declarations of her viqws in relation to the change-

ful aspect of Europe ; — it affords us a glimpse of the foreign policy of the existing Parliamentary session as foreshadowed in its primary debates ',—, — and it assures us that England need not in vain expect every man to do his duty in " the most formidable struggle" upon which she was just on the eve of entering. Habitual as is the interest, to sight-seers, at every annual meeting of Parliament, there was an intensity of sentiment manifested by the congregated thousands drawn together to witness, or participate in, the opening of the session of 1854. Since the early days of Nelson and of Wellington, the warlike enthusiasm of the British people was never roused to such a pitch ; and, sure are we, that never did England gird on her armour in a juster or a nobler cause. The Queen, as she passed along to meet her Lords and Commons, was greeted with love and loyalty on all sides — her illustrious consort, we regret to observe, was on the contrary, recei'^d with coldness and suspicion. r The Turks and their Ambassador appear to have been the chief lions of the day, for we learn — At different points Turks dressed in their national costume, who had come to see the procession, were received with, strong marks of popular favour. As the carriage of the Turkish Ambassador passed down the Malls, His Excellency was loudly cheered. .. Many anxious eyes were directed in search of Bato Brunow, the distinguished representative of the &^f, but in vain ; and when it was whispered that the progress of the Turkish Ambassador through the streets had resembled a popular ovation, it was thought that the Russian Minister had exercised a wise discretion in not provoking a outburst of popular feeling. The Turkish Ambassador, wearing his red fez cap and a dark blue uniform, richly faced with gold, and decorated with the stars of two or three orders, entered the house a little before two o'clock, and was the subject of a flattering amount of attention, if one might judge from the number of glasses directed to him and his suite from the ladies' benches, and from the buzz of conversation which followed his arrival. M. Musurus was warmly greeted by many of his brother diplomatists, and took his seat on the second bench. < Arrived at the House of Peers, and having taken her seat upon the throne, the scene that ensued, in consequence of the scrambling of the "faithfnl commons" to obtain good places, seems to have greatly amused her Majesty ; so much so that it was some little time before she was enabled to deliver the following speech, which was spoken with her customary clearness of intonation, but amidst the shuffling of feet, the contention of voices, slamming of doors, and other most unmannerly interruptions : "jl/y Lords and Gentlemen, — [ "I am always happy to meet you in Parliament ; and on the present occasion it is with peculiar satisfaction that I recur to your assistance and advice. "The hopes which I expressed at the close of the last session that a speedy settlement would be effected of the differences existing* between Russia and the Ottoman Porte iia^e not been realized, and I regret to say that a state of warfare has ensued. "I have continued to act in cordial co-operation with, the Emperor of the Trench, and my endeavours, in conjunction with my allies, to preserve and to restore peace between the contending parties, although hitherto unsuccessful, have been unremitting. I will not fail to persevere in these endeavours; but, as the continuance of the war may deeply affect the interests of this country and of Europe, I think it requisite to make a further augmentation of my naval and military forces, with the view of supporting my representations and of more effectually contributing to the restoration of peace. "I have directed that the papers explanatory of the negotiations which have taken place upon this subject shall be communicated to you without delay. "Gentlemen of the House of Commons,— "The estimates for the year will be laid before you. and I trust you will find that, consistently with the exigencies of the public service at this juncture, they have been framed with a due regard to economy. "jliy Lords and Gentlemen ■> — t "In the year which has just terminated, the blessing of an abundant harvest has not been vouchsafed to us. By this dispensation of Providence the price of provisions has been enhanced, and the privations of the poor have been increased : but their patience has been exemplary; and the care of the Legislature, evinced by the'reduction of taxes affecting necessaries of life, has greatly tended to preserve a spirit of contentment. . „ . "I have the satisfaction of announcing to you that the commerce of the country is still prosperous : that trade, both of export and import, has been largely on the increase ; and that the revenue of the past year has been more than adequate to the demands of the public service* "I recommend to youi consideration a bill which I ha^e oidcrcd to be framed for opening the coasting trade of the United Kingdom to the ships of all friendly nations ; and I look forward with satisfaction to the removal of the last legislative restriction upon the use of foreign shipping for the benefit of my people. "Communications have been addressed by my command to the Universities of Oxford and Cambrdge, with reference to the improvements which it may be desirable to effect in their institutions. These communications will be laid before you, and measures will beproposcd for your consideration with the view of giving effect to such improvements. "The establishments requisite for the conduct of the civil ser\ice, and the arrangements bearing upon^its condition, have recently been under review ; and I shall dhect a plan to be laid before you which will have for its object to improve the system of admission, and thereby to increase the efficiensy of the service. "The recent measures of legal reform have proved highly beneficial, and the success which has attended them'may well encourage you to proceed with further amendments. Bills will be submitted to you for transfeiring from the eclesiastical to the civil courts the cognizance of testamentary and of matrimonial causes, j and for giving increased efficiency to the superior courts of common law. "The laws relating to the relief of the poor have oi late undergone much salutary amendment ; but there is one branch to which I earnestly direct your attention. The law of settlement impedes the freedom of labor ; and if this restraint can with safety be relaxed, the workman may be enabled to increase the fruits of his industry, and the interests of capital and of labour will be more firmly united. «• Measures will be submitted to you for the amendment of the laws relating to the representation of the Commons in Parliament. m # "Recent experience has shewn that it is necessary to take more effectual precautions against the evils of bribery and of corrupt practices at elections. It will also be your duty to consider whether more complete effect may not be given to the principles of the act of the last reign, whereby reforms were made in the representation of the people in parliament. In recommending this subject to your consideration, my desire is toremove every cause of just complaint, to increase general confidence in the legislature, and to give additional stability to the settled institutions of the state. "I submit to your wisdom the consideration of these important subjects, and I pray; God to prosper your councils and to guide your decisions." The answer to the Address was moved, in the Lords, in a maiden speech of much promise by the Earl of Caernarvon, supported by Lord^ ... Contrary to general expectation, it experienced no opposition, and elicited but little^ comment. With respect to their conduct of Foreiga Affairs, the replies vouchsafed by the Ministry were stigmatized by the Earl of Clenricarde. as extremely meagre. However, judgment was suspended by most of the speakers in both Houses, until the presentation of the " printed papers," when more ample explanation was promised. The accusations respecting the unconstitutional practices of Prince Albert were, likewise brought under consideration ; and, as far as the matter had proceeded, the refutations of Lords Aberdeen, Hardinge, and Westmoreland appear to have been complete. The preparations for war, and the palterings about peace will be fully apparent in the ample and varied extracts which we, this morning, present.

"We liaro received a large paquet of Journals, per steamer, from all our -neighbour provinces,

importance of the European intelligence, and the more immediate pressure of our own local affairs, preclude us from doing barely more than making mention of these supplies. The Taranaki dates are to the 17th — Nelson 20th — Wellington 13th — and Lyttelton 6th inst. The two former are broken files. Of the long-looked for clipper shipßalnaguitb, we gather the following particulars from the * Wellington Spectator' of the 10th— " The Balnaguith, one of the ships of Messrs. F. Young & Co.'s Line, arrived on Monday from London, having called at Lyttelton. She sailed from Plymouth on tlie 29th December, and arrived at Lyttelton after a passage of one hundred and sixteen days j she encountered very - heavy weather in the Bay of Biscay, and throughout the passage has been rough and boisterous It was intended that she should have proceeded first to Auckland, but having come South about, and being short of water, she was compelled to put into Lyttelton. The Balnaguith had sixty-five passengers, of whom about 34 were landed at Lyttelton, and we believe of the remainder the greater part intend to remain at Wellington. A complimentary address was presented to her captain, A. Smith, Epq., by the passengers at Lyttelton, and a dinner was given to him by them, to which the chief officer, Mr. Pearson, was also invited. We understand the Balnaguith will proceed to Auckland in ten <]ay 3 or a fortnight."

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Bibliographic details

THE SOUTHERN CROSS. Friday, May 26, 1854., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XI, Issue 721, 26 May 1854

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2,552

THE SOUTHERN CROSS. Friday, May 26, 1854. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XI, Issue 721, 26 May 1854

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