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ENGLISH NEWS TO OCTOBER 12. (From the Melbourne Argus, Jan. 14 )

By the Beejapore, English news to October 12th has been received in Sydney. — From the summaries given in the local jour-

nals and our recent files, we compile the following : — It bad been determined by the Anti-Corn-Law-League to hold a grand banquet at Manchester before the assembling of Parliament. The day fixed was the 9th November. As to the intentions of the Ministry, the following extract from the ' Manchester Guardian,' October 9th, is the most definite and the most consistent with former professions, and the course of events : — "A report has assumed a somewhat definite character at the Carlton and the Conservative Clubs in London, that the Chancellor of the Exchequer is engaged in perfecting a general scheme of import duties, by the addition of which the revenue, assisted by the accumulated surplus of the two years, (for it must always be remembered that Mr. Disraeli has done nothing with the large surplus bequeathed to him by the late Government), he intends to repeal part of the existing income tax. We will not vouch for its accuracy, but we know it is implicitly believed in by some who are intimately connected with the G-o-vernment. Another rumour is, still adhering to the resort to import duties, that a large portion of the funds thus raised will be expended in the relief of local charges in the counties. The 'establishment charges,' as they are termed, of the union workhouse, the entire expense of county gaols, of lunatic asylums, of public prosecutions, of rural police, -and for bridges and other analogous public works, are to be drawn from the consolidated fund, and the means necessary for those purposes supplied in the way which we have indicated. Such a scheme would be in perfect unison with the proposals already repeatedly made by Mr. Disraeli when in opposition." The electric telegraph was about to be extended to the Isle of Wight. The 'Liverpool Mercury,' Oct. 12, says : — "The Prince Albert, the vessel fitted out at the expense of Lady Franklin, has returned from the Arctic Regions, after an absence of nearly 17 months, but without having discovered any new traces of the mi§sing expedition of Sir John Franklin. The despatches which she has brought from Sir E. Belcher show that that gallant officer's search will be most vigorously and resolutely carried out." The first Cabinet Council for the season was appointed to be held on October 15th. Lord Derby was expected to arrive in London on the 14th. The Liverpool and Rochdale wool markets were reported with "an average amount of business, without any material change in prices." The 'Daily News' says : — "We learn from Vienna that an English officer has been insulted by an ofiicer in the Austrian service. We have received no particulars, but are informed that Lord Westmoreland has thought it necessary to demand redress." Advices from St. Petersburg of the 2nd October state, that the whole Russian array had been ordered to wear mourning for three days, in memory of the late Duke of Wellington. A memorial for the restoration of the palace of Holyrood to her Majesty's use, has been despatched by the lord provost, magistrates, and council, to the Treasury and the \ Board of Works. The Hanoverian army has received orders .to wear mourning for six days for the Duke of Wellington. j M. de G aspar is, astronomer royal at Naples, has just discovered another new planet of I great magnitude. The Right Rev. P. Torry, D. D., Bishop of St. Andrew's, Dunkeld and Dumblane, died on the 3rd of October, at the episcopal residence at Peterhead, in the ninetieth year of his age. The extent of the potatoe disease in England and Scotland is as great as it has been in any previous season, — 1846 perhaps excepted. The forced sales made earlier in the season in Ireland, have been followed by comparative scarcity and an advance in price. The town of Crieff was lately visited with a shook of earthquake. It was accompanied with a loud rumbling noice like thunder. Elopement. — Information has reached London, that Miss Blair, a ward in Chancery, and a rich heiress, possessing between ,£BOO and £1,000 a-year, has eloped from Taunton, with Mr. Garratt O'Moore, of Queen's county, Ireland. There were rumours afloat that the Derby ministry were making overtures to Lord Palmerston to join them. The death of Earl Somers is recorded. The number of ships despatched from Liverpool during the month of September, was sixty-two, containing in all, 23,280 passengers, including 1,770 emigrants, all of whom were bound' for Australia. > Germany.— The 'Journal, de Frankfort' publishes an article to which spine of our foreign con temporaries have attributed a semi-official character, on the pretensions of Louis Napoleon, and the view taken of them by the power 3 who signed the treaty of Vienna. According to this journal, the powers renounce all idea of maintaining that article which excludes for ever the members of the Bonaparte family from the throne of France, and confine themselves to. guarding those which relate to the territorial limits of the French state. Accordingly, should Louis Napoleon seize the empire, the powers would be disposed to acknowledge his title, upon his making a declaration of adherence to the territorial provisions of the treaties of 1815. The Austrian Government has just rendered the observance of the Sabbath obligatory in all parts of the Imperial dominions.. On that day, all public and private .works are to be suspended, and all shops closed. Austrian Homage to tiie Duke. — A correspondent at Vienna, writing on tho

Ist inst., says, " The emperor was uuwilling to leave his capital again before paying his tribute to the manes of the great Duke, Whom the grandfather of Francis Joseph, in common with all the potentates of Europe, delighted to honor. Field-marshals do not die every day, so that when it became known that funeral honors would be paid to the Duke of Wellington, Austrian field-marshal and Grand Cross of Maria Theresa, a great crowd assembled to witness the proceedings. This very impressive military solemnity was held on the glacis yesterday. The whole of the garrison turned out with muffled drums and the other insignia of mourning, and, in addition to the usual crape on the arm, it was remarked that the flags of the lancers and tho regimental banners were trimmed with black crape. The emperor j appeared also in mourning, and His Majesty ! Las given express orders for the observance of the same military ceremonial in all the j chief towns of the empire. When the Dead March was played, and the defile over, the twelve batteries discharged their three rounds of farewell, and volleys from the walls of the city responded to the mournful salute over the imaginary bier. Lord Westmoreland and a brilliant assemblage of officerswere in immediate attendance upon the emperor. The whole officers' corps, down to the lowest subaltern of the Regiment Wellington, will accompany their colonel, J ■who is going to London to join in the funeral ■procession of the illustrious Duke."

France. Notwithstanding the forced silence of the journals, both in Paris and the departments, the public are beginning to discover that the enthusiasm of which some glowing descriptions have been given by the telegraphic despatches, has never existed. People are at length becoming sensible, from the falsehood ©f the accounts given by the government , scribes of what has taken place in their own presence, that they have been deceived as to what has taken place elsewhere. The violent means made use of by the prefects to force rural communes, however unwilling, to take part in the manifestations, have also given great dissatisfaction, and have actually produced a reaction in favor of a free press and representative government. It is generally reported in Paris, that the coldness (almost amounting to hostility) of the reception given to Louis Napoleon, made co deep an impression on his entourage, that General de St. Arnaud gave it as his opinion that the " progress" should be cut short. It is admitted by the * Moniteur' that cries of " Vive l'Aumestie" were raised at Montpellier. The President said : " I hear cries of " Vive l'Amnestie." An amnesty is more in my heart than in your mouths. If you desire it, show yourselves worthy of it by. your wisdom and patriotism." The Marquis de Dammartin, mayor of Uzes, was assassinated on the 30 th September, at six o'clock in the morning. He „was shot while leaving his own honse. No cause for the crime is known. Private accounts, however, state, with emphasis, that M. Dammartin was at the head of a deputation, on their way to pay their respects to the President, when the event occurred. The council-general of the Loire-Infe-rieure has passed a resolution expressive of their wish that the government should permit Generals Lamorici&re and Bedeau, natives of that department, to return to France. Orders have been given that the repairs and decorations at the Tuileries are to be completed by the 15th of October at the farthest. That is the day, or the day but one, before the President's return to Paris. The * Revue Britanni^ue' states that an application has been made by the French government to the English cabinet for the original will of the Emperor Napoleon, which has hitherto remained in the possession of England. Prince Louis Napoleon arrived at Bordeaux, October 7th. The President's reception was most enthusiastic. The ' Times' says : — " It was reported that a telegraphic despatch had been received, announcing that the President, when replying to one of the authorities of the city, declared formally that he accepted the empire." Italy. — -A. letter from Naples of the 25th August, states, that on the previous day, his Majesty and the royal family came to the capital from Caserta, to offer up his devotions at the shrine of St. Januarius. On returning in the afternoon, the railway train which carried his' Majesty run into another train, which had been stopped by some impediment on the road. No injury was received by any of the royal party, with the exception of a slight bruise on the head of one of the princes royal. The king on leaving the carriage said "It is nothing, no one is injured. Providence has protected us." The Pontifical Government has agreed to pay half a million of florins annually to Austria, in consideration of the occupation of some of the legations by Austrian troops. 250 copies of M. Victor Hugo's work, " Napoleon the Little,' have been seized and confiscated at Arona. It 'is said that Field Marshal Radetzky intends to retire from active service to his villa at Kayback. The death of the Duke of Wellington has it is stated, profoundly affected him. Persia. — Advices have been received through Germany, from Tauris, of an attempt to assassinate the Shah. While he vtas hunting, four men approached the monarch, under pretence of presenting a petition, which he refused to accept. Two of the fellows then seized the horse's bridle, while their companions fired two doublebarrelled pistols at the Shah, who although wounded in the thigh and mouth, was still able to retain his saddle, and keep off his assailants until his suite came up. Two of

the assassins were literally cut to pieces; the others, who were taken a\ive, declared that they had no accomplices, but that belonging to the Babis, they had determined to avenge the death of their chief by murdering the Shah. Dr. Cloquet has extracted two of the bullets, but has not succeeded with a third. The Shah's life was not considered in danger. . The cholera was making great ravages in Persia at the end of August.

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Bibliographic details

ENGLISH NEWS TO OCTOBER 12. (From the Melbourne Argus, Jan. 14 ), Daily Southern Cross, Volume X, Issue 587, 11 February 1853

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ENGLISH NEWS TO OCTOBER 12. (From the Melbourne Argus, Jan. 14 ) Daily Southern Cross, Volume X, Issue 587, 11 February 1853

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