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The Straits of the Dardanelles, which lend from the Mediterranean into tlio Sea of Marmorri, separate Europe from Asia. The breadth, averaging about two miles, varies frou: 3.400 yards at its narrowest part , to-four fiiiles at its widest. At the western entrance, a distance-of two miles separates the .forts at Capo Holies, or Sedd el Baluv, oil the European^side, and Kum Kale 011 the Asiatic. There are also hereabout earthworks, and other fortifications line the Straits, particularly at the narrowest part between- Kelid liahr and Kale Sultanieh, sonic 12 miles from the entrance, tho_ total length of the Straits being 35 miles. Tlio Kuropean coast is generally liigli and steep, while that of Asia, less steop, is bordered by islioals and sandbanks. The'anchorage of Nagara Bay is oil the Asiatic side, just beyond the narrowest part of the Straits, and here the Turkish Fleet usually lies at anchor. Almost opposite this anchorage is Gallipoli,-on th<> Kimipean side; and just hevoiul. to the north-cast, is the Isthmus-of Bulair, between the Sea of Marmora and lite Gulf of Saras. The bay on the gulf side of the isthmus is known as Yenikli Liman. From Ibis isthmus to Cap Holies, forming the European shore of the Dardanelles, is the L!;illipoli Peninsula, which was known m ancient times as the Chersonese. The places named in ihe above messages are nearly all indicated in the map. Sedd el Hahr, as wi!! be see:; J'rc:n the map, commands the European side nf the entrance to the Straits, and at the opposite point of the small bay of which Sedd el Balir is the western point is liski llissnrlik (not shown in the map). Sa>;i Haln* is not. marked on the maps at our disposal, but it. nwy b" a .mis-spelling of Sedd el Bahr, The Doints of debarkation, mentioned in tho Athena teleaiinis, arc all shown ou tlio map. ,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DOM19150430.2.30.1

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The Straits of the Dardanelles, which lend from the Mediterranean into tlio Sea of Marmorri, separate Europe from Asia. The breadth, averaging about two miles, varies frou: 3.400 yards at its narrowest part , to-four fiiiles at its widest. At the western entrance, a distance-of two miles separates the .forts at Capo Holies, or Sedd el Baluv, oil the European^side, and Kum Kale 011 the Asiatic. There are also hereabout earthworks, and other fortifications line the Straits, particularly at the narrowest part between- Kelid liahr and Kale Sultanieh, sonic 12 miles from the entrance, tho_total length of the Straits being 35 miles. Tlio Kuropean coast is generally liigli and steep, while that of Asia, less steop, is bordered by islioals and sandbanks. The'anchorage of Nagara Bay is oil the Asiatic side, just beyond the narrowest part of the Straits, and here the Turkish Fleet usually lies at anchor. Almost opposite this anchorage is Gallipoli,-on th<> Kimipean side; and just hevoiul. to the north-cast, is the Isthmus-of Bulair, between the Sea of Marmora and lite Gulf of Saras. The bay on the gulf side of the isthmus is known as Yenikli Liman. From Ibis isthmus to Cap Holies, forming the European shore of the Dardanelles, is the L!;illipoli Peninsula, which was known m ancient times as the Chersonese. The places named in ihe above messages are nearly all indicated in the map. Sedd el Hahr, as wi!! be see:; J'rc:n the map, commands the European side nf the entrance to the Straits, and at the opposite point of the small bay of which Sedd el Balir is the western point is liski llissnrlik (not shown in the map). Sa>;i Haln* is not. marked on the maps at our disposal, but it. nwy b" a .mis-spelling of Sedd el Bahr, The Doints of debarkation, mentioned in tho Athena teleaiinis, arc all shown ou tlio map. ,, Dominion, Volume 8, Issue 2449, 30 April 1915

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313

The Straits of the Dardanelles, which lend from the Mediterranean into tlio Sea of Marmorri, separate Europe from Asia. The breadth, averaging about two miles, varies frou: 3.400 yards at its narrowest part , to-four fiiiles at its widest. At the western entrance, a distance-of two miles separates the .forts at Capo Holies, or Sedd el Baluv, oil the European^side, and Kum Kale 011 the Asiatic. There are also hereabout earthworks, and other fortifications line the Straits, particularly at the narrowest part between- Kelid liahr and Kale Sultanieh, sonic 12 miles from the entrance, tho_total length of the Straits being 35 miles. Tlio Kuropean coast is generally liigli and steep, while that of Asia, less steop, is bordered by islioals and sandbanks. The'anchorage of Nagara Bay is oil the Asiatic side, just beyond the narrowest part of the Straits, and here the Turkish Fleet usually lies at anchor. Almost opposite this anchorage is Gallipoli,-on th<> Kimipean side; and just hevoiul. to the north-cast, is the Isthmus-of Bulair, between the Sea of Marmora and lite Gulf of Saras. The bay on the gulf side of the isthmus is known as Yenikli Liman. From Ibis isthmus to Cap Holies, forming the European shore of the Dardanelles, is the L!;illipoli Peninsula, which was known m ancient times as the Chersonese. The places named in ihe above messages are nearly all indicated in the map. Sedd el Hahr, as wi!! be see:; J'rc:n the map, commands the European side nf the entrance to the Straits, and at the opposite point of the small bay of which Sedd el Balir is the western point is liski llissnrlik (not shown in the map). Sa>;i Haln* is not. marked on the maps at our disposal, but it. nwy b" a .mis-spelling of Sedd el Bahr, The Doints of debarkation, mentioned in tho Athena teleaiinis, arc all shown ou tlio map. , Dominion, Volume 8, Issue 2449, 30 April 1915

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