Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image

THE THEATRE.

(Br Sylvius.) The World's a theatre; the Earth a stage—Hey wood. Australian Ballet Girls. Minnie Everett, who is responsible for the ballets, marches, and groupings in ■the J. C. Williamson pantomime of "Puss in Boots" in Melbourne, speaks eulogisticully of the work of the.girls-who, from raw material, have progressed to the stage of the finished article, and will grace the big Christinas show on Saturday night (21st). "There can be no doubt that while the .number of girls offering has largely increased during the past two or three years," said Miss Everett, "the quality has not'shown an appreciable advance; and yet we were exceedingly fortunate in being able to secure as fine a body of girls as one could possibly wish for.. It ~is I a striking, fact,' too,: that .this: year's girls, have proved.-remarkably quick and intelligent. They have, dropped into the. work as if they were quite used to it, and what has surprised me particularly is their vocal ability. Once upon a!time, as ■the story books say, we used to have the choTus sung 'off- stage' instead of; by ihe ballet, as the work with their feet-was practically all they could'do. Now, we. have the ballet singing as well as dancing—which means the saving of'-an immense amount of trouble and' rearrangement. Ithink that . in. this 1 respect—the vefktility of the chorus and ballet in. Australia' we are far ahead of. the.theatres in' London and New York, for •' example." "The Girl in the Train." Says the Sydney "Bulletin" of "The Girl in the Train," the new comic opera to be done here- presently by tho J. C. Williamson. Company:. "The sensational and amusing divorce case brought by Misa Dorothy Brunton, against her husband, Mr. W. Talleu-r Andrews, with Miss Sybil Arundale as the co., is likely to afford considerable amusement. It' is usual that long before his Honour Mr. Justice Percy, takes his seat every portion of the available space for the public is filled; and his Honour shows a too rare consideration for the public in not clearing the court when the evidence gets particularly interesting. The charming insouciance in which the fatuous ..car conductor 'Scrop' addresses the Judge as 'Laddie Boy,' with such dire and parlous frequency, should earn a handsome committal for contempt of Court, and Miss Arundale sings beautifully, and looks, more so. By the way, the music of Leo Fall has qualities which can only be' fully .appreciated by. a second hearing. The dance duet by Messrs. Percy and-Prince'usually dislocates the traffic by. its 1 frequent recalls." • "Milestones." the new play by Edward Knoblauch and Arnold Bennett, which reintroduces Mr. Julius Knight and Miss Grace Noble to Australian audiences, was produced -at-the Criterion Theatre, Sydney, oil December 14, and made an instantaneous, success. Describing the play, the "Sun" said:— ' : "The manufacturing families of Rhead and Sibley, and the noble family o£ Monkhurst, are portrayed in a series of incidents a generation apart from one another. : Somo of the characters, like those of Sir John Bbead (Mr. Julius Knight), or .'Aunt Gertrude (Miss Grace Noble), go right through the .play, from, the period of sentimental youth in 1860 to that of extreme old. age in .1912; others, appear. in only one or two acts according to their ages. In each aot there is a love crisis, and the authors have directed their greatest skill towards developing each love storjin harmony .with the social sentiment of ty pariod; Tho result is that there are three remarkably distinct types of girlishnessl Man being less a creature of environment and custom than woman, the authors have very cleverly -made the salient characteristics of the men of one generation veryn'siniilartio those'of.2s or; 50 years - later, : but' the three '■ lo girls—Rose Sibley in 18G0, Emily Rhead in 1885, and Muriel;Pym in 1912—are lum-inous-studies, in social change. > ; '"Mr. Julius Knight has the big part of John Rhead,. the .shrewd , manufacturer who in youth,forsees the big ftiture of iron 6hips, but in middle age pooh-poohs the idea of steel'construction; John lthead is dramatised in three phases, the second of which is an intolerant middle age, and the third the querulous obstinacy of the seventy-year-old. The most effective of tho three was the John Rhead of filj years old, at the height of- his material success, and an unquestioned tyrant in his family. . . ' . ... " "For sheer;acting elrill Mr. Knights impersonation of the old man was perhaps even better than his second phase, but the second impressed the more powerfully. The. part requires, a versatile, actor, and Mr. Knight gave a proof of his remarkable versatility. "Another striking character which went right through\the fifty years was that of Aunt Gertrude (Mis 3 Grace . Noble), the. old maid in whom the spirit of rebellion is never quenched. ■ Miss Noble was. responsible for. lifting the first act rifjfht above the level of dramatio interest which . the others, gave to it, although it must not'be forgotten that in this act, Mies Eily Malyson, as' Rose. Sibley, personified the shrinking maiden of the mid-Victorian, era with her "tears of sensibility.' " A New Tenor. Mr. Talleur Andrews, the new robust tenor, who .'will,appear as Karl Van Buren in the J. C. Williamson production of "The Girl in the Train,"' has won the good graces of. his.audiences.all oyer Aus-, tralia. Jle is easy and resourceful in style, an alert and talented actor, and full of temperament. He eings witha great deal of individuality, and with round, full tone in the higher ranges. His excellent articulation is one. of the features of his work. Writing of Mr., Andrews, a Reading Sydney musical, cntic .w of opinion as follows; "In the new tenor, Mr. Williamson has made an undoubted find. It is'many years since an artist of the' calibre of; Mr. Andrews has been seen and heard in Australia. He has tone, quality, and romantic perception. Nothing better than hie rendering j of 'Parted has been heard on the modern light opera stage. 'It is so beautifully rendered, so perfectly poised in the phrasing, so generally artistic, that it could hardly be surpassed in. its skilful "treatment.'" ' ■ v • Sarah Bernhardt in "Queen Elizabeth."' ■ ■ Messrs. John Fuller and Sons- have secured the'exclusive rights for the Dominion of the wonderful historical drama, "Queen Bess," with Mme. Sarah Bernhardt in the title role. In dealing with, this picture drama, an English critic said: "One finds oneself confronted with a difficulty'not often experienced, namely, the absolute impossibility of doing justice to it in the comparatively small space at one's disposal. The subject requires an entire volume and not a few lines." Queen Boss must surely impress one, being, not only the greatest historical film yet . produced, but also that the. likelihood seems small of ever equalling it. The story alone would make a powerful drama, even though it were enacted by mediocre, artists. But in this particular case, not only are the njinor parts taken, by actors and actresses of note, but the chief role, that of Queen Elizabeth, is played by the most celebrated of actresses—perhaps the most celebrated that the world has - ever known. - » ~ A Now Zealand Actress. Miss Marjorie Day, a New Zealand actress is praised for her. personal charm und vivacity as Virginia in "Tantrums" at the Criterion Theatre, London. Bom at Auckland, Miss Day had her first stage experience in the Dominion. Little more than ten yeare ago, the talented New Zealander went to England." Her first London appearance was in tho 1902 production of A Little Unfairy Princess" at the Shaftesbury; Theatre. Interviewed early in November, Miss Day said:—

"Miss Beatrice Terry, who is going to Australia, Miss Maie Ash, and Miss Jessie Bateman, were among my associates in Airs. Hodgson Burnett's charming play. Continuous engagements in a variety ot plays, interspersed with pantomimo work each Christmas, occupied me for the following two years. Then I had my first important London engagement, at Drury Lane, in the autumn of 1905, in Hall Caine's highly successful play, Tho Prodigal Son.' I remained at Drury Lane for the pantomime of 'Cinderella,' and In April of the following year I appeared at the -New Royalty Theatre in 'Castles in Suain'—whicn met, with such success that.

it was, perforce., subsequently transferred to Terry's Theatre. In August of the ! samo year I appeared again at Drury i Lane, and subsequently at the Adelphi ; •as a Milkmaid (actually milking one of ; Lord Rothschild's cows upon tho stage) ! in another Hall Caine play, 'The Bonds- ! man.' After acting at the Scala Theatro I in 'The Judgment of Pharoah,' I went to ; the Lyceum in a now version of 'Tho I Christian.' , Then I appeared as Essie i Iterein in Bernard Shaw s .'The Devil's .-! Disciple.' I was next at tho Garrick as ! Vera in 'The Woman of Kronstadt,' Mary . : Bandeleur in 'The Marriages of Mayfair,' f and in 'The Whip' at.Drury Lane; also ! at the Lyric in 'The Strong People,' and j tho ...comedy,in 'Mount Pleasant.'. Madame." Pavlova, the famous 'Russian, j dancer; then Invited mo to accompany her | on-tour to play .lead in tho one-act plays which form a supplement to .her Terpsir j chorean entertainment. Madame Pavlova ; released me," so -tliat I might accept tho i engagement for 'Tantrums.' I' hope to ' return'to. New Zealand in a year or su. Notes. ' -~x : ] — On November-13-it-was chronicled- that Mr- Dan Polyat, .. .the popular London comedian, had -been thrown- from - his horse while appearing in "The 'Arcadians.'', t One London paper stated that Mr. Kolyat was'.suffering from an-injury .to his spine.The unfortunate musical comedy artist . the'original '.Simplicitas' in'the.'.Xyn?:' : don'"production'.of.;"The.Arcadians." Sim- i plioitas rides a. close of tho | race scehelin'.the-s'econd .act; ,

• luiiliV A6che-Brayton.. production".:.ol, •"Antony; and ' Cleopatra"- •at ' Melbourna' : Theatre Royal,' .Mr.- Asclio"wilLappear."''as.' : Mark 'Antony, Lily Bray ton as' Cleopatra, Frederick Worlock ■ as-Octavia- Caesar, • Herbert Griniwood as'Domitius- Enobar-. .'bus, H. R. Hignctt:a9 Agrippa,: It. -lan Penny-as Alexas, Alfred Bristowe as Diomedes, Calab' Porter .as; Soothsayer, E.:F,; Arison as Clown, Olive Noble as-Octavia,. Elfrida Gliment ias Cramian. .i™,.

. According to the ' "New York Time's," Mr. Nat. C. Goodwin, America's leading comedian, 'will never ''again "appear on-.tho stage, and will 'lie a helpless' cripple-aa the result of the injuries he received on August 15. whilo attempting to land dur-: ing a gale from a yacht in a 1 small row-boat-on the Californian coast.' Mri John" Warren, secretary,of the American Dra--matists' Association, states that the com-, edian is now paralysed in the lower limbs,' as the result of a fracture of the pelvia bone. Since the accident the condition of, the actor's mind.has'npt.been good, .and his friends fear a breakdown of his mental powers. He. is * said, to have become morbid and morose, due to fear that ho will, never bo able to walk again or appear on the stage, although he has. not been so informed. The unfortunate actor,, who is well advanced in years, was under engagement, to appear in* New. York in : a. new play entitled "The Fox," - to-which' he was to have played the leading r01e,..'

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DOM19121228.2.93

Bibliographic details

Dominion, Dominion, Volume 6, Issue 1634, 28 December 1912

Word Count
1,830

THE THEATRE. Dominion, Volume 6, Issue 1634, 28 December 1912

Working