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CRICKET.

[By Tot Bbeakeb.]

HAPPY WEDNESDAY MEN. Rev. E. 0. Blamires-Which Club? The Rev. E. 0. Blaraires—what is ho going to do with himself on Wednesdays ? So far tho genial padre, has not takon up tbo bat lor his old club, Artillery, and rumour has it that ho may not do so. Who then, will get him? bomo say Rivals, but the whole thing is in nubibus yot, and, in nny case, Mr. Blamires will not be in town next Wednesday, so wo shall not sea tho lion on the held for some little time. Speaking "without tho book,' wo believe that it is correct to stale that Mr. Blamires loves uot onu-sided games and, possibly, ho has a feoling- that Artillery bristles with enough "heavy guns" without him. Last season, not knowing whom to joiu, ho just took a match at ran•dom, and made up his mind to join tho losers, whichever team it might bo. Iho match happened to bo .Artillery v. Oriental and, as it also happened, the former had tho very good luck to lose, for by losing they got him. If there is anything in the loregoing, then it rather looks as if Rivals will capture him this season, for they aro not quilo so strong as ono or two cf tho other elevens. Besides that, they aro presently to loso tho services of Stninton who is being transferred from Wellington. First Centurion at iho Basin. Bombardier Smith, of Artillery, who emoto his way past tho century on tho first day of tho Wednesday encounters, is a good stamp of New Zealand cricketer. Up at tho barracks he is popularly known by tho soubriquet of "Giffen—Mark II." The joke has reference to a foat which ho once performed of scattering tho stumps of Goorgo Giffen, when tho great .South Australian was beginning to bang the Wellington bowling about. On that occasion—somowhere about 1896—the bombardier was a momber of the Wellington Tcpresontalive eleven against the Australians, nnd he lowered a number of their wickets. lio is now about 39 years of age, and seems to have given up the strenuous effort of bowling to specialise with tho bat Ho is an old Mount Cook school boy, and played in the school eleven which won tho schools' championship many years ago. Ho afterwards played for local jnnior teams known as tho "Alberts" and tho "Surreys," both long since vanished— übi suiit? At the age of 19 he was a member of the Midland Club, and afterwards pined his representative cap. There is plenty of cricket left in him yet, as Rivals bowlers have found to their cost' in the current Wednesday matches.

Arcadia on Wednesdays. Hnppy Wednesday men! They roam the fields of Arcadin, while tho Saturday men livo in Bohemia where nobody knows, after a shilling has been spent,' where tho next shilling is coming from. But tho financial wnves which ' beat on the coasts of • tho Satnrday Bohomia. do not' even touch tho Wednesday men with their echoes. And tho Wednesday cricket is gottin<* bettor and better. On the first Wednesday we. had Bombardier Smith's big infliugs, and, last week, both M'Gill's and Bramley/s batting wns worth watching. Al'Gill has a stunning straight drive just past tho bowler—so fast that the smack of tho bat on tho ball, and the smack of the ball on the fence aro not far divided tn point of time. Good management seems to havo a deol to do with tho general success of Wednesday cricket, and the Wednesday Association aro undoubtedly fortunate in having tho services of such an official us Mi.tJv.'C. Cusack. Mlo does hustle things nlong. It will probably bo a great Wednesday season before 1911-12 has finally sped its way into tho great lap of the things that havo been. The "Protest Game" on Saturday. Of the shaggy sort of muddle which broko up tho Saturday senior contests, perhaps enough has been said. Watching tho "protest game," which was played on the Basin Reserve, one could hardly help boing struck with Tucker's cutting. They cay, do tho experts, that his square cut is his best stroke. On Saturday, however, batting against I'indlay's fast stuff, he wns catting late, ami, as the north bowler keeps a whole army corps of white h'anuel inthe slips, needless to say somo of Tucker's best strokes got him no rnns. But what a pretty turn of the wrist tho East batsman has got! Another feature was I'indlay's howling. Tho fraction of "Tho Breaker" who is writing, never saw .Findlay in his life before, and always understood that ho was just a plain, fast, straight border. As a matter of fact, he Bccm.i to mnko tho ball "do a bit" both ways. As to the off-break, it was only very occasional, arid might have been caused by "hitting lninps,' but the log-break was undeniable. Unfortunately for Findlay, how-' ever, ono can always tell from the action of the arm. when it is coming. If he could disguise it somehow, ho would be twice as hard to play. The Cost of Playing. At tho special geaoral meeting of tho South Club this week, it was mentioned that it costs about J23 per season to play. One is inclined to think that it costs a good deal more. What with subscription, iovy, uniform, travelling, and, maybe, a private lat, a oricketcr seems to be lucky if £"> covers his expenses for tho season. Brici's Match. Tho absenco of five men from the East A eleven, along with Brioe's century and 27 ( to say nothing of Nunn'a half-hundred, will certainly let Petono in for a twopoint, if not a three-point win. Tucker, Afidlano, nnd Co, will doubtless bo looking for the individual who was responsible for "that notice."

The ncwly-formcd oval at Petono is probably tho fastest in "Wellington just now, but tho wicket can bo improved on. It is rather bare, and needs a littlo ■weeding. Town playors must feel tho pleasure of playing on a ground where only one match is in progress. There is no fear of receiving a knock from au adjacent game. Brice, who must annex nil honours in this game, bowled excellently. Ho quickly got it good length, and dismissed last's live representatives, and, then, ■what an iunings he played! He has never boon in better form, and ho banged his century along, principally by drives, although there wejo plenty of snicks in tho slips, and "whangs" to leg. He hittwo sixes, ono of which went close to tho Technical School. Just an hour and throe-quarters at the wiokets, and never gave a chance, shows somo bat handling. It is rather a coincidence that tho last time on which Brice played for a junior team in the Hutt Valley his score wns 112, and, in the iirst senior match nt Petono some years ago, against Gay Company, ho made lOC. Horace Nunn got 53 very nicely, gavo one chanco to Gibbs, and got himself out by hitting recklessly. As a slow legbrealr bowler Nunn wants to cultivato a length, and also acquire more control of the ball. It was rathe; - a mistake that manoeuvre of his—placing the field on tho leg-side, and sending in full pitchers to the off. Harbor, another Petone bowler, although not mooting with success, made the batsmen play. M'Kenzio ia a very promising all-round player, and rat'JeJ on a fair score in no time. How Did East Shape? (Jibbcs, who opened with Hickson, for East, sent the ball to tho boundary with frequency. He was at tho wickets exactly fix minutes for 17 runs. Tho wicket did not suit Gibbes for bowlin;;, yet !ip puzzled tho batsmen time after timoi and was the only ont- who steadied Krk;n. (Jriwnctt wa.« very comfortable with tho bat, r.nd would havo got a long scoro if tho missing five hail turned up. He was well dealt with when bowling. Next to Gibbes, llickson was tho best bowler, and often boat tha batsmen with balls thi'.t "'louUl have enhanced his average, but ilid not. Unless a tniraclo happens, East must lo:>sp to-day. It is just a question of a two or three-point win.

The Stranded Senior Club. Little surprise was occasioned anions cricketers by the news that tho South Club were in straits, for the association hud already a couple of proposals in view which might lighten the load of clubs so situated. Their plight illustrates one ot tho demerits of the district scheme. J hero is much to bo said in favour ut districts, but there is at least one thing lo bo said against them—the clubs so formed are of members who very often have no esprit do corps, They do not choose their own club, and their own playing associates, and they caro very littlo whether they play with them or with someone else. This was not a fault of tho oil club system. South's immediato dilhoiuty is a financial one, but the rocky state ot their liimncos-an empty exchequer with Uoavj liabilities—haa been brought about by a low membership roll. A few in the club havo dono herculean work to correct things, but they have been a very small party. And yet in point of population the district is the largest in nil Wellington. Tiio players are there, surely, but tho committee has simply uot been ahlo to enrol them. What the Association Must Face. A special general meeting of the association is to bo held on tho 23th instant to consider a number of things connected with tho control of cricket. Ono motion, concerning the South Club only, which will como before the meeting, stands in the name of Jlr. H. W. Burbidge: "iliat tho South District Cricket Club for tho season 1911-1012 be granted permission to recruit its membership up to seven additional members outside the duly-allotted boundaries." If this motion goes through South ought at least.to bo ahlo to fill a iirst and a second grade team, which they declaro they are . unable to do at present. • Another motion, of winch Jlr. V. li. Willis has given notice, has the object of regulating the subscription payable by a club to tho association, according to tho number of teams entered. Tho motion is as follows:—"That the words 'senjor grade ton guinea?, other grades live guineas,' in Rule 11 of the Rules of tno Wellington Cricket Association bo deleted, nnd tho following words inserted in lieu thereof:—'l-'or senior district clubs live guineas for entrance for senior chainpioiuOiip, three guineas for entrance for junior.championship, and two guineas for entrance I'or third-class championship; any senior district club entering more than ono team for any championship, one guinea extra, for each additional team; lor junior district clubs and all oJier clubs, live guineas." Another proposition to go beforo tho general meeting has to do with the constitution of the Management Committee. It suggests that there be an elected executive, instead of tho present one, consistini' of club nominees. J.his motion, it is said will find a lot of supporters, among those who declare that tho members of tho committed now are interested only in their sevpral clubs, anil that they are apt to forget that their first duty is to the gnmc Generally. If this motion finds favour, it is safe.to say thnt there, will be many changes in the personnel of tho committee.

South and Hutt. South's total will take somo catching to-tlav, for Hiitt have two wickets down for i) runs. Laws and lenton -pat up a fine partnership. Laws plr.yed really well, and, when seven off a century, was caught, by E. Judd oft an awkward ono from Matthews. Teuton secured 34 in quick time, keeping the field busy. He bowled splendidly, dismissing h. .Tudd and Matthews for 5 runs. Matthews held Hntt's bowling average, and was the cause of fonic discomfort to tho South mon. E. Judd was better than usual. As the match stands, boutn should Ret a two-point win. Brilliant Victorian Colt, Tho only new face in tho Victorian team, for Adelaide'is-.th.-it. of,,R.ibrilliant colt, 'Norman Brown. "\6t yet'twenty, one, his all-round performances for the p.ist two or tlir«e years have marked out for him, with ordinary luck, a distinguished career on tho cricket field (says the Sydney "Referee"). Bowling right hand, lie turns the ball mainly from 1«? at nearly medium pace, whilst with help from tho wicket lw can break from the off with almost equal facility. 4 brilliant field, nnd stylish, dashing , to reckless batsman. His latest performance against a strong East Melbourne team, on a. perfect pitch, was S9 balls, 1 maiden, 13 runs, G wickets, his victims including Jl'Alister, E. V. Carroll, Laver, and Parsons. Brimful of cricket, one hopes that he Rets a decent' start in Adelaide. He plays for the "Baby Seniors," Northcote, a club that was bora of the Board of Control and winch had already justified its illustrious parentage. Other Australian Gossip. The intimation that the brilliant 'Adelaide batsman, D. It. A. Gears, did not intend to play for South Australia against Victoria was received by Adelaide followers of cricket with regret. An Adelaide writer says:—"lt war, freely stated that Gohrs would not take part in any first-class matches this season, and" considering that he is a prominent candidate for Autrahan Eleven honours, the ; statement caused considerable surprise." . The fact is that Gohrs is wisely placing tho claims of business befoie those or cricket. He has not yet, however, decided that ho shall not play at all this season. He could not sparo the time to enter npon tho easasemc-nts against Victoria, but ho may be able to take- his place in tho South Australian team later on. He is associated with the same firm as 11. Webster, the Sydney wicketkeeper, who is in the South Australian team against Victoria.

A Blackham Feat. A feat of no little distinction by J. M. Blackhara is recorded in 1879-80. A visiting team oi' twelve, including H. 1. Boyle, J. M. Blacldinm, G. Gibson, G. Alexander, "W. H. Cooper, T. Pcndall, and Johnny Muliagh (the most expert of the aboriginals), played twelve of Bendigo, who Jed by two runs on the first innings. Illackham stumped six in tho first and three in the second innings, thus accounting for nine of the .22 wickets. Trumper Could Not Have Surpassed It. E. P. Barbour is one of,tho most promising batsmen in New South Wales at tho present time. An exchange gives tho following account of a recent performance for Varsity against/\Vaverley :—E. P. Barbour,. who opened with C. J. Tozer, inado 73 of the first 10S in 50 minutes. It is far tho finest batting I have seen this season. It was 50 minutes of Trumper at his top. Cuts, drives, aii'l hooks were made so crisply, and tho ball placed fo cleverly, that one might have believed it Trnmpsr himself. This delightful and brilliant display of scientific br.ttin? was ended by a clinking ball. Davis, who bowls slows left-hand, has a "i'losic ,, ball. Well, one of these of good length he dropped in to Harbour, who reached forward to stop it, but it took the middle stump. Poor Old Otago, Otago cricket was surely never so weak in .bowlers as at present (says a Duncdin exchange), and tho outlook., ir. view of tho match against ' Canterbury for Plunket Shield honours at Christmas is not promising. There is not a class bowler in sight, and unless a star arises between now and January, the province •will have little hopo in annexing the shield from Canterbury. Said He Would Make a Century. Tho truth of tho saying, "There's many a true word spoken in jest," was exemplified in Christchurch cricket recently. Early in his innings, FullGr, of West Christchurch, hit a ball on to his wicket without the bails falling, and he remarked that after such luck he would make a hundred. He probably littlo thought that his words would come ( true, and that ho would mako 101.

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Bibliographic details

CRICKET., Dominion, Volume 5, Issue 12831, 11 November 1911

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2,668

CRICKET. Dominion, Volume 5, Issue 12831, 11 November 1911

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