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English News.

An extraordinary scene took place at the wedding o£ a couple who were married in Belfast. The acquaintances of the happy pair procured three donkeys, and decorated them with gay ribbons. Carts were then procured, and as the bride and bridegroom left the church they were bundled into the foremost donkey cart, and an attempt was made to form a triumphal procession. Finally the pair made their escape in a hackney car. Mr James S. Geikie, the composer of 'My "Heather Hills ' and various sacred airs, has died at Ormiston, Haddiugtonshire. Mr Geikie, \yho used to be well known in musical; circles, was the . father of the pi'esent. Director of the Geological Survey, Dr Archibald Geikie, and of Df James Geikie, the Professor of Geology in the University of Edinburgh. He was about 72 years of ago, and is survived by his wife and several of his family. The Duke of Edinburgh is having constructed at Eastwell a large and commodious dairy. It is built of wood from the Prince of Wales's estate at Sandringham, and is as a plan quite unique for this country. It is to be fitted up in an elaborate manner, with introductions from Russia and other countries. Since his residence at Eastwell his Royal Hignncss has taken great interest in farming matters, and has, it is stated, several prize animals which will be exhibited at the forthcoming cattle shows. The Journal el Oorreo publishes an account of the recent execution of four sergeants implicated in the • military rising in Spain. The first volley from the firing party only killed two of the men and badly wounded another, whilst the fourth remained unhurt. A second discharge was thus rendered necessary. As the troops were leaving the scene of the execution, one of the sergeants suddenly rose from the ground and begged that his life might be spared. The soldiers, however, fired another volley and killed him. At the Clerkenwell Police Court, Charles Clements, 55, tailor, living at' 6 Buxton Street, Clerkenwell, was charged before Mr Hannay with beingdrunk and incapable in Brewer Street, St. John Street Road. The defendant's face bore traces of considerable injuries, and he looked a somewhat pitiable spectacle. Mr Hannay, addressing Mr Robinson, the chief gaoler, asked him if he had a lookingglass in his room. On receiving a reply in the affirmative, his worship, addressing Robinson, said, 'Take him and show him his face, and then let him go ; if that will not be a warning to him, I don't know what will.' At "West Hartlepool, George Rollings, who has a grocer's outdoor beer, license at Belle Vue, was, charged by Sergeant Dunn with allowing beer' to be consumed on his premises on July 27th. Mr Thos. Thomas, of Stockton, defended. The evidence showed that a man named Davys entered defendant's shop about 9.30 : p.m., and after asking for a pint of ale, to hold which he borrowed a jug o£ defendant's step-daughter, commenced drinking it as soon as he turned from the counter, and sat down on the door step and finished it. The defence was that the defendant was not present, and that his stop-daughter neither saw the act nor. could have • prevented it. Rollings was fined L 2, including costs. A Paris telegram says that experiments have been made at the Place de la Concorde with one of the omnibus company's large three-horse vehicles. It was driven by electricity at a rate superior to that at which omnibuses generally go, and was turned with surprising facility. At five o'clock M. Cochery, Minister of Posts and Telegraphs, M. de Lesseps, MM; Dietz, Rbuvier, Blanchard, Burgues, Colouel Barblez, and several gentlemen got into the omnibus, which, to the astonishment of a large crowd, was seen to move off rapidly without horses. The mechanism by which it was propelled was simple; Four accumulators, weighing. 2500 kilogrammes, aiid giving out a force of 72 horse-power, had been placed under the seats and put in communication with a Siemens machine fixsd'.uncler the xe.hi.cle.

The Dundee University has been lighted with the electric light. ■ ' • A sapient Magistrate at Souillae has fined a man ten francs for calling his neighbour a Bonapartist, on the ground that • th.fi norao means thief, traitor, and assassin.' The ideas of Republican liberty entertained by some Repub 1 icans are past all understanding. Messrs Moody and Sankey are now centred in the vicinity of Islington, London, where, in. a temporary building erected for tha. purpose, they are drawing immense congregations twice a-day, to which admittance is by free tickets. Their services are creating great .excitement and enthusiasm. An odd scene has been witnessed at Sandwich at a meeting of the East Kent foxhounds. Just before the hunt commenced, Reynard succeeded in making his escape to the town, and entering the house of one of the residents, concealed himself under a chair in the drawing-room. When disturbed, he made his escape by a back door. At a public dinner at Nairn in November, Lord Thurlow said that as a Lord-in-Waiting he had had opportunities for nearly three years of judging of ' the real hard labor ' the Queen had to perform in the discharge of public business ; and 'it was no exaggeration to say that her Majesty was the hardest - worked person in her dominions.' At a meeting of the Church. Diocesan Synod of Dublin, a resolution was passed to the effect that the sad experience of the last three years of terror points undeniably to the fact that the resumption, of Ireland's Parliamentary independence must inevitably be followed by great peril to the Protestant Churches, confiscation of landed property, disruption of the Union, and, at no distant, date, the horrors of civil war. A well-known mansion in Arlington Street, Piccadilly, was the scene of a dinner, which, in spite o£ the date, included amongst its guests a number of notables. But the feature of the occasion was the telephonic apparatus which was found at the side of each plate. These telephones were all connected with a hall about a quarter of a mile distant, in which a carefullyselected orchestral band was playing during the meal. Each guest was thus able at his or her own sweet will to get snatches of music between the coulees. The idea was not original, however, as it had already been carried out by Mr Vanderbilt at his mansion in New York. — London Correspondent. A Montreal citizen of ' respectable position,' but with Fenian proclivities, has been recently taught a lesson in a way amusing to everybody but himself. A petty officer of H.M.S. Canada heard him speak disrespectfully of our Royal Family, and at once knocked him through a plate-glass window. The bystanders were so pleased at his combative loyalty that they paid the bill of damages, and when the corvette reached Halifax a six-dollar note was found awaiting the ' gallant tar,' with a promise to double the sum if he gave a lesson in. manners to ' any other foulmouthed ruffian.' Prince George of Wales is said to have offered his congratulations to this plucky shipmate of his Royal Highness, who is popular both on the main and quarter deck. ' A significant result of'the'temperance agitation in London is the reduction on all sides of the value of publichouse property. City taverns and suburban hostelries are falling in price as rapidly as they rose 10 years ago, and the auctioneers who make a speciality of the sale of that* class of property are troubled not a little to find customers for their goods. A few weeks ago a public-house in a street off the' Strand changed owners for two-thirds of the price it fetched not long since ; while the highest bid for a long-established restaurant in .Fleet"' street 'did not amount to half the sum fixed as the reserve. If the force of the movement should continue unabated for a little longer, the question of 1 compensation to tavern proprietors aiid tavern keepers will shrink into very small limits. The international Exhibition of Needlework, which is to be held at Sydenham in July 1884, will include among other curiosities, two. things which will not be the least attraction of the Exhibition. One is the famous needle presented to the Emperor of Germany last • year " under circumstances worth recalling. The Emperor was' visiting the great needle manufactory, at Kreuznach, and was desious of seeing for himself the relative power of machinery compared with skilled hand labour. A bundle of superfine needles was placed before him, 1000 of ' which weighed less than half an ounce, and he expressed his astonishment that eyes could be bored m such minute objects. Thereupon the foreman of the boring, department asked His Majesty to give him a hair from his beard, and, receiving it, he bored an eye in it, threaded it, and handed back to the astonished Emperor this improvised and most peculiar needle. The other curious needle was maufactured at Redditch, and presented to the Queen. It is a sort of' miniature Trajan's column. All around it are represented scenes from the Queen's life executed so minutely that a magnifying glass is required to distinguish, them. This needle can be opened, and within it are a number of very fine needles, on which also scenes have been engraved.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CL18840321.2.13

Bibliographic details

English News., Clutha Leader, Volume X, Issue 545, 21 March 1884

Word Count
1,549

English News. Clutha Leader, Volume X, Issue 545, 21 March 1884

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