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The Clutha Leader. THURSDAY, APRIL 13th, 1876.

In last issue we referred to the political career of the present Premier as being oneof'budden impulses ancl vacillation, undirected, by any principle, and the impossibility of judging from any of his past acts or utterances as to what he may say or do for the future. His life has to such an extent been one of contrarieties, that were it worth while 'to undertake a minute criticism we beiieve it would be found there are but 'few pledges or assertions of his on record" to 'which he has not at some time given the lie direct. For instances of this no'research is requisite; they are to be found 'on the surface at every step of his career. It will be remembered that when the' various schedules of railways to be constructed out of borrowed

money were laid before Parliament, ! many of these lines were objected to by Southern members as being* undertaken merely to secure a continuance of po\rer bj Sir Julius, and any others he might associate with himself in the Colonial Executive — mere political railways — which presented no prospect of ever being able to pay working expenses, far less interest on the capital expended. Only the feeblest attempt was made to shew that they were required or would pay; but the " southern obstructionists" were silenced by the assertion that it was none of their business whether they paid or not, as the expenditure on all railways would be provincially charged ; that is, if they did not pay the province wherein they were made would have to make it up, and no other province would be affected thereby in the slightest degree. This disarmed opposition, although not suspicion, as some doubts still continued to be expressed. To remove all such at once and for ever Sir - T ulius paid a visit to Dunedin and this is what he said upon the subject :—

You have been told over and over again that you in effect were being asked to construct railways at your own cost for the Xorth Island. That is one of the appeals that have been made to your feelings to induce you not to approve of immediate effect being given to our measures. But what is the fact ? The Act makes it imperative that the expenditure on railways shall be provincially charged. Let me read the clause to you. It is in the nineteenth clause of ihe Act, and reads thus :— " All moneys which shall from time to time b^ expended under the authority of this Act (except such as shall be expended out of the Middle Island Railway Fund account) shall immediately upon such expenditure being made be charged against the province in which the works upon which such monies shall have been expended are situate in the manner provided by the 44th section of the Public Revenues Act, 1867, and the 10th section of the Payments to Provinces Act, 1870. Provided that, as to so much of such moneys as shall be expended out of any loan, such charge shall he the interest and sinking fund from time to time accruing due in respect of such moneys, commencing from the date of the borrowing thereof and a proportionate part of the cost of raising such moneys." That is, I think you will admit,an absolute declaration that all moneys expended on railways shall be provincially charged. Another proof that it is really meant th.it the money spent shall be so charged, is afforded by the fact that half the duties on stamps collected in any province, are, subsequent to the present year, to be set apart in aid of railway expenditure.

Upon this " absolute declaration " a considerable extent of political railways were constructed. We had the assurance of Sir Julius Vog*el, Premier, that the expenditure would be provincially charged. We now turn to a speech by the same gentleman the other day al Wanganui, and upon the subject we find he says; —

There is another point, and a very important one, to which I must refer. Wo have found that the present system by which the Provinces each continue to be responsible for deficiency of interest on the cost of the construction of the railways within its boundaries, is very unsatisfactory . We have to keep a separate system of accounts, ! aud separate management in each Province, in 'order to tell how much is to be charged against each. This involves so much difficulty that we propose to ask Pai-liament next session to authorise the Colonial Government to take over the eoutrol and management and liabilities of all the railways in the country. I may say, apart from the financial aspect of the question whioh has to be dealt with, but which I do not propose to enter upon now,this-is one of the most important matters we have to deal with. In ■ fact, the Minister for Public Works lias put it in the strongest manner, and says :— " If I am to bo asked to continue to manage the railways as" they now are, I cannot do it," "If we want to take a railway from, one province into another we hive to keep separate accounts in each. In a few days the railway from Canterbury to Otago will ruu across fche Waitaki, and we shall have to kcej) two separate accounts of expenditure and receipts It must be remembered with respect to the Province being responsible [for the railways •in future, that, whilst we can ;keep 'some accounts between the Provinces and ihe colony now, because they are distinct, these accounts "will be 'almost imaginary When the Provinces cease to exist, and tho debts from one to the other will have "a very unreal character. It w6uld be as if Brown and Jones being in partnership should suddenly call themselves Brown and Co, and Jones 'and Co., and should proceed to draw upon each other 1 and -keep accounts of tha •transactions. The audacity df the proposal is only equalled by the silliness of the excuse put forward — the difficulty of keepingtbe accounts between the various provinces ! 'How are the accounts kept between the numerous companies which own the net work of railways through-

ont Great Britain, the Continent of Europe, and America? Th« question need not be auswered. The accounts are kept, and kept very simply and accurately, and the same thing could be dono here. Sis Julius' reasoning upon the subject seems somewhat mixed. He thinks these accounts will be almost imaginary when the provinces cease to exist, and illustrates this by a reference to Brown and Co. and Jones and 00. drawing upon each other. One thing is clear — permission to form the political railways was obtained upon an " absolute declaration " that the provinces of the South Island would not be responsible for the interest of the expenditure. Now that the money has been expended Sir Julius proposes to t\make those provinces pay any deficit equally with the provinces in which tliey are situated. The object of this is no doubt to purchase additional political support. We do not know what our i*eaders may think- of the whole transaction. To us it looks very much like obtaining money under false pretences. At all events we should not advise nny one to attempt any such tricks in private life, or in ordinary business transactions. It might end rather awkwardly. In politics, es-. pecially wtth those in power, in New Zealand it seems all right.

We do not know what course Mr Maeandrew and his executive propose to pursue with reference to the carryingon of the public business of the province now that the appropriations of the Pro. vincial Council are expended. It remains to bo seen whether they will submit to accept of our own revenues being- privately manipulated by tho Colonial Executive and dealt out to this province and others as they may think fit. The winter is now cominoon, and we all know tnat many roads and other works require immediate attention. Great inconvenience will he occasioned should fhe supplies be even temporarily stopped in tho meantime; and the temptation therefore is great to accept what may be offered ami under whatever conditions. Wo however greatly misinterpret the spirit of the public, if a little inconvenience would not readily be submitted fo rather than

an abandonment oi political and constitutional rights. No doubt we shall shortly learn the com*se his Honor and Executive have determined npon, but in the meantime Sir George Grey lias issued his manifesto on behalf of Auckland, and a noble example is thus set to other provinces. Ho concludes a letter to Dr Pollen as follows : —

At the present crisis they (the 'provinces) hold in tlieir hands the power of obtaining justice in theso respects as a condition precedent to thoir relinquishing rights which the law now secures to them. You must remember that tlieir revenues are raised for themselves, and aro their own, and that the General Assembly has been authorised to raise those revenues for certain specific purposes and to carry on the Constitution established, under which and for the support of which those revenues have been raised. If abolished, their revenues would necessarily appear to become the property of the people here, and it will be for themselves, and not for' the Parliament, constituted to carry out a totally different Constitution to which tho people of this province may not have assented, to receive, and to expend those revenues. You will see, therefore, how necessary it is that the inhabitants of this province should after they havo been informed of the precise nature of the new Constitution which it is intended to impose upon them, give their intelligent assent to it before they relinquish the great liberties they now on joy. If you will not agree to appropriations out of the revenue of this province being openly appropriated, refrain from making any recommendations for appropriation of such revenue. The time has now come when the people of these provinces must accustom themselves to make pecuniary sacrifices for great public principles. A habit of taking what can be got for fear of suffering loss, rather than the system of refusing anything but what is lawful and right, has led to great losses to tho Province of Auckland, Wo must therefore now say : we will have what we are entitled to by law and constitutional principles • we will have nothing else, aud we will take it in no other way. It will be only a small pecuniary sacrifice to aid iv opposing the secretly appropriating of the least portion of revenue taken from \is by taxation. From apparently small sacrifice of principle, a constantly repeated system may be established which would render it easy to plunder and deeply injuro the interests of the people. I consider that in advising tho people to part with lawful and constitutional rights in order to securo an expenditure of public money, I should act wrongly, as if I advised a man to accept a bribe on condition of neglecting his duty. Did 1' accept an appropriation of public money on the conditions you offer, I helievo, from the dealings which have already taken place, that probably the money obtained would not be expended until after a longer delay than will occur from the course I intend to pursue. But, whether this maybe the case or not, I believe the whole province will support me in the course I have thought it my dirty to pursue, and that tho very men who may temporarily suffer from want ot employment they may have hoped to gain, will feel pride iv submitting to inconvenience in sup r port of a principle which they will recognise as great aud true. One will learn that there is pleasure in making sacrifices for maintenance of public rights, and will hereafter Value more dearly the privileges which they have purchased by a personal loss.

A LONDOX telegram mentions a fall of 2d per lb. on greasy wool, ; David Nisbeit, alias "Scotch Jock," died suddenly in Melbourne last week. Tite Taieri annual race meeting has been fixed to be held at Mosgiel, on Friday, 28th April. The New Zealand 'Saturday Advertiser' of the Bch last, gives a gratis supplement,— a timetable of tho New Zealand railways for April. We have received the April number of the 'Illustrated New Zealand Herald.' Its engravings are a very good selection, and the execution unexceptional. THE return match between the Star "and Albion Juvenile Clubs will be played at Balclutha j to-morrow. The Clutha Club close the season ! on Saturday week with a match, Married v. Single. The * Guardian ' of yesterday says :— lt is nowpretty generally understood that the Provincial Government officers will not give any information to the Commissioners, and .they are obtaining data from the Provincial Auditor on which to base a report. Vinoknt Pyke, Esq., M.H.R , is the winner of the .£lO 2)rize recently offered by the proprietors of the 'Saturday Advertiser' for the best essay on " The Form of Local Government best suited to ISTew Zealand." The essay appears in the ' Advertiser' of Saturday last. We understand that the Psalmody Committee have appointed Mr Reid to teach classes thi s season in Jvaihiku, Waiwera, Clinton, Wairuna, and Tiipauui. Mr Reid intends commencing nest week. It is hoped that these localities will take such interest in this important subject ns will make the classes a success. It may not be generally known in the Clutha district that, in accordance with Dioscesan regulation, tho offertories on Easter Day (Sunday first) are given to the clergymen .of the different parishes and parochial districts. Such is the case, however, and it is to be hoped the collection on Sunday at St, Mary's will be liberal. A r-AI/METiSTON- telegram says :— A serious accident happened to Duncan's coach on leaving hero on Tuesday. The reins having fouled, a passenger got down to arrange them, when he fell, tho wheels of tho coach unfortunately going over him. Tho extent of the injuries is not known yet, but they are supposed to be serious. No blame whatever attaches to the d2-iver. Tran Beaumont and O'Brien troupe gave their ontortaininent at Kaitangata on Tuesday evening las;t. 'The attendance was greater than might have been expected from the inclement state of the weather.— in fact, larger titan has been witnessed for some tinro past. Miss Annie Beaumont and Mr Mark Eggerton were frequently applauded, and tho audience evidently appreciated the programme.. As the troupe have been staying in the neighborhood for a somewhat lengthy period, we have no doubt their entertainment iv Barr's Hall to-night will be .well patronised. Ix order to dispose of the surplus provisions contributed to tho Presbyterian Soiree in Balclutha, on Thursday evening, by the ladies of the congregation, tho children were invited to attend at the church tho following evening. The juveniles do not appreciate tho benefits of denominationalism on such occasions, and on Friday night apparently the whole children of the town "and surrounding districts " were in attendance in good time. The difficulty of tho disposal of the baskets of fragments wa.s speedily got over. Some hymns were sung, and, the business over, the juveniles dispersed much gratified with tho whole proceedings. Caft. Havward, of Catlin's Pavor, reports on 3rd April : — "The number of vessels which arrived here during the past month was ten, of 387 tons register ; and five sailed, of 203 tons. Three loaded at the Owake mill, and two at the Big Mill, —all for Duredin. The Spec, Isabella, Fanny, Huon Belle, Anna, and Lloyd's Herald are waiting a chance out, —the two first-named being bound to Lyttelfcon, the rest to Dunedin. The heavy sea that accompanied the dirty weather during the equinox has washed away the portion that was left of the Stirat, so that now but little is to be seen (and that only at low water) of this once fine ship." We are not in the habit of referring to the mistakes of our contemporaries,-— we have quite enough to do with our own, but we think it right to call the attention of the 'Guardian' to the fact that the gentleman who has the control of the scissors in his establishment seems occasionally to let things get somewhat mixed. He culled several news items from our last issue without acknowledgment. That we don't care for, as we frequently make the same omission. But in the same issue tho 'Guardian' published a number of other items 'from us, and says he does so from tho ' Tuapeka Times.' We don't do this : it is telling lies, and that wenever do. We would advise the ' Guardian,' for the sake of his own reputation, to give it up. We were sorry yesterday to hear of the severe illness of Mr Georgo Coombo of Milton. Prom what we could learn it appears that when sitting in his own house reading a newspaper, between 10 and 11 o'clock on Monday night, he then being apparently in good health, he was suddenly seized with an appopleciic or other fit, and. fell to the floor. The noise brought Mrs Coombe, and medical assistance was at once procured. lb was found that in addition to the fit or stroke referred to- he had at same time burst a blood vessel, and which it is said in all probability saved his life. He continued in a most critical state for some time, but ypsterday he was progressing favorably, and it was hoped that danger was past. We are sure all will be glad to see him shortly about again. At the weekly meeting of the Lodge Hope of Balclutha, 1.0.G.T , on Friday evening, there was a good attendance, and a number of new members were proposed. A letter ,was read from the G.W.S., intimating that it was the intention of the G.W.C.T., accompanied by a number of th.c officers of the Grand Lod^e, to visit the Balclutha lodge On the evening of Friday, the 14th instant, (to-morrow,} and a hope was expressed that as many from the Inch Clutha and Kaitangata Lodges as could possibly make it convenient to attend, would be present. It was resolved to hold meetings for conferring the second and third degrees on the second Priday of every month, and it is intended shortly' to consitute a Degree Temple in. connection with the lodge. At the close of the meeting, the lodge was opened in the second degree, and the , degree was conferred upon five, members. The 1 lateness of the hour prevented opening in thej third degree. To-morr,ow night, then, the; G.W.C.T. anil the officers of the Grand Lodge' will bo present. Business over, refreshments will be served in the lodge-room, winch no doubt will bo crowded/

A bout ten days ago, a serious accident happened to Mr Alexander Sutherland, a respectable settler in the Tokomairiro Gorge district. He was riding along at a rapid pace, a short distance from his house, on his way to the Postoffice, when his bull, which was feeding on the side of the road, happened to move right on to the track in front of the horse, and a -collision occurred, Mr Sutherland falling violently. Al- ' though nb bones were broken or dislocated, "still ' Mr Sutherlaud is iv a very weak state, and his> nervous system is somewhat shattered. Much sympathy is felt in the district for Mr Suther-' land and "his family. A SOIREE in connection with the Inch Clutha congregation was held in the .Prill Shed, on Tuesday evening. Notwithstanding the cold and boisterous state of the weather there was a large attendance. The speakers were tho llev. Dr. Stuart, Dun edin, Will, Taieri, Chishohn, Tokomairiro, and M'Ara, Balclutha. A motion was passed unanimously and most enthusiastically that steps be at once taken for the erection of a new church, and a Committee of four waselected to act with the office-bearers in securing a site, procuring plans and specifications, &c, for the "new building. It is expected the site to be chosen will be in the vicinity of the new bridge. The whole proceedings in connection with the soiree passed off successfully-. A full report will appear in next issue, W.E understand that Sergeant Finnegim at present stationed here, has got notice that his services are about to be transferred to North Dunedin, and that he only now waits the arrival' of his successor (Senior Constable Daley, Teviot) to take his place at Balclutha. The Sergeant has now been a number of years among us and all will agree that he has carried ont his duties in a very quiet and unostentatious manner. Indeed it is well known that oven those upon whom his duties demand that lie should keep a constant watch, have regarded the Sergeant more as a personal friend than as an officer to enforce the. i law. While some will regret his removal, all [ will bo glad to know that this removal means ! promotion, and their good wishes will attend him in his new sphere of labor. It will not only be interesting but very grtifying to our readers to hear that Dr Jackson, who has on. more than one occasion ably assisted Dr Smith in his extensive practice in this neighbor- ; hood, has succeeded to tho piactice lately carried on by Dr Scott, of Queonstown, — the latter gentleman having been elected to tho position of Besidenfc Surgeon, by the authorities of the Hospital in that town. Dr. Jackson passed his final examination at Trinity College, Dublin, where he displayed extraordinary ability and aptitude in tho study of his profession ; and there are many in Hue locality who can testify to tho care • and kindness bestowed on them during his stay here. We have uo doubt he will become a universal favorite in that neighborhood, the inhabi- , tants of which ai*e to be congratulated on having , secured the services of so talented a gentleman. We heartily wish him success and long life in his new sphere of labor. . A NUMBER of gentlemen including Messrs A. J. Smith, Parar, Bank of New South Wales, Drs. Smith and Fergusson, Mr Cnunond, Mayoi, W. Maitland, G. Bain,' Walter Taylor, Mr Douglas, and others, had a trip from Balclutha to Kaitangata per rail on Saturday last. They visited -the -coal pits, went down the shafts, up the drives, and fully examined the magnificent seam of coal which is now being opened up. All expressed themselves with much enthusiasm as to the prospects presented. They believe -the seam to be equal if ,not superior to anything , yet discovered in the district. It i 3 expected the pit will be hifly opened up, and the Company in readiness to supply Dunedin and other toy. ns with coal by the Ist May. The railway is finished and is in very good coudition, the train gb quite smoothly even when at full speed. We presume there will be some demonstration at tho formal opening when we shall give fuller particulars. A slight shock of earthquake was felt in Dunedin at midday on Tuesday. At Port Chalmers it was more severe. At Palmerston it made windows and household articles rattle greatly. It was much severer than those felt on ; 26th February. The earth manifested great agitation. From Oamaru the telegraphic reports in the * Guardian" are :— " A severe shock of earthquake was ! felt at 31,50. It is said to be the most severe felt yet. Though the damage done is not so seriouti as by the celebrated one of 26th February, several 'chimneys have been badly shaken, and the walls'-bf' buildings, including the telegraph office, cracked. : There was a general stampede for the street. The direction was north-east to south-west. The shock lasted several seconds.'' Another telegram says:— "The earthquake shocks have not ceased. We experienced a slight one about a quarter to 9 this morning, and at 20 minutes to 12 another' shock which for duration and power was far more severe than any before experienced. The plaster of the new Grammar School was shaken down, and some stone buildings visibly injured. Thero is unmistakably a feeling of uneasiness now felt. | here by many." -The shock was also felt pretty i severely at Timaru, Naseby, and Queenstown, j but no damage was done. According to 'the c Herald ' tho financial resources of the inhabitants of the township of Milton, would ajypcar at present to be at a very low ebb. Preferring to tho 'attempt being made again to start the Pottery works, our 'confcempor«ry says :—" ft 'has been stated that the people of Milton have shown themselves 1 to bo blind to . their own interests, or. they would never have' allowed the potters to remain idle. This may hetrue to a certain extent but wo are perfectly sure that at the present time it would be absolutely i?npossible to raise in this district sufficient capital to give a fair start to any new industry, however bright its prospects might appear/ Had the' Pottery works been situated at Balclutha we belinve the financial difficulty standing in the way of another start would easily be got over.. As it is the Clutha Capitalists would 2-e'adily have lent a helping' hand, were it not for'the fact that' they did so before and we're bitten. : Last year an attempt was made to establish 'a Company to take over the works, and judging from the reports then given by our contemporary a large 1 number of shares Were taken up. Relying upon' the accuracy of these reports and the stability of': the works, a number of Balclutha gentlemen: took out "shares and paid the money. They have; not seen a -farthing of it'since, and have heard no more of "the bubble 'Company. They will thus be careful how they invest ih Tok'omaifiro-Pottery . Companies, for the future. If 'a living cannot be made in Milton, then brrsiness men should? . follow the example set by Messrs -Sontter and ', Gray, and come to Balclutha where we can! assure them they will find abundance of capita 1 and genuine profitable industries in which to, •invest.

•?Thk usual "privileges" in connection wiMi the Balclutha Race meeting were disposed of by auction, by Messrs Grigor, Mnitlar.d and Co., on Saturday evening. The following were the pries realised :— No. I booth, A. Young, £11; No. 2 booth, Thos. Iveonan, £11 ; coffee stall, Kilgonr Bros., £1 ss; fruit stall, W. Brigo*. 10s; g-.tes - Lewis, £26 ; cards, A Younsr, £3 ss. Total •£65. -It will be remembered that a few weeks ago a deputation from the Town Council and the Matau Road Board waited upon His Honor the Superintendent, to urge the formation and metalling of the road between Stirling and the railway terminus here, when but little prospect was held out that the work would be undertaken in the meantime. Every one acquainted with the present condition of the road quite agree that without extensive repairs the same will be utterly impassable during winter, and the traffic between Balclutha and Stirling will be stopped. In order to obviate the inconvenience which would thus be occasioned, Mr Cramond placed himself in communication with the railway authorities, with a view to having the goods for Balclutha and the South brought on to the railway terminus, instead of being kept at the Stirling station. The want of the requisite accommodation for loading and ' discharging goods, at the terminus, anrltbe expense of a rockcutting and laying of rails for a siding, stood in the way of the proposition being agreed to by the Railway authorities. To obviate this, Mr Cramond agreed to procure- tho necessary ground fov accommodating the traffic, and also to make the cutting at his own expense. This has now been done and the rails laid in the siding, and in a few days goods will toe received and discharged at the terminus, instead of at Stirling as hitherto. Thus the difficulty of the portion of road referred to has been got over so far as the railway traffic is concerned. Of course, Mr Cramond expects to reap a pecuniary benefit from tho heavy expense to which he has gone. He certainly deserves to do so, but at the sametimo the public will fully share in the advantages to be derived from the arrangements he has been able to make and tlie work he has carried out.

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The Clutha Leader. THURSDAY, APRIL 13th, 1876., Clutha Leader, Volume II, Issue 92, 13 April 1876

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The Clutha Leader. THURSDAY, APRIL 13th, 1876. Clutha Leader, Volume II, Issue 92, 13 April 1876

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