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A DISTINGUISHED CAREER

DEATH OF MR A. T. BOTHAMLEY

LONG ASSOCIATION WITH PARLIAMENT [THE PRESS Special Service.] WELLINGTON, December 18. The death has occurred of Mr Arthur Thomas Bothamley, 1.5.0., who was for 45 years an outstanding figure in the Parliamentary life ot New Zealand, having been Gentleman Usher of the Black Bod from 1892 until 1937.

Mr Bothamley was born on St. Andrew's Day, November 30, 1846, at Champion Hill, Surrey, England, being one of a family of 17 children. As a young man he did not enjoy robust health, and when 22 years oi age he left England on a recuperative trip to Victoria and Tasmania. Within a year or two he visited New Zealand, and liked the country and its pioneer people. He joined the Civil Service as a clerk under the late Sir James Hector, who was Director of Geological Survey and Manager of the New Zealand Institute. In 1871 Mr Bothamley was appointed an extra clerk in the Legislative Council. Promotion was rapid, and within seven years he became Clerk Assistant to the Legislative Council, and held that position until his retirement in 1925. In addition to that service, however, jVTr Bothamley acted as Private Secretary to the late Sir John Hall, who was then Premier, during the Parliamentary recess in 1878. For two years he also acted as Clerk or Parliaments and as Clerk of the Legislative Council for three years. In 1892 he was appointed to the position of Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod. The honour of the Imperial Service Order was conferred on Mr Bothamley in 1924. | Parliamentary Changes

Of the many records that Mr Bolhamley could claim, one was the interesting fact that few men in New Zealand had seen so many Governments and legislators come and go. His initial service in the Legislature was during the fifth Parliament, ana he retired in the second year of the twenty-fifth Parliament. The Fox Ministry was in office when Mr Bothamley entered the service oi Parliament, and during his unrivalled career no fewer than 30 Ministries held office. Mr Bothamley's clear memory recalled the advent and passing of famous Conservative anu Liberal Governments of earlier days, the comparatively quick changes in administration during exciting political periods, the creation of war-time and other emergency Ministries, the disappearance of at least one distinctive party, and the outstanding triumph of the present Labour Government. He witnessed a historical succession of Premiers and Prime Ministers, some of whom had more than one term of office—-Fox, Stafford, Waterhouse, Fox, Vogel, Pollen, Vogel, Atkinson, Grey, John Hall, Whitaker, Atkinson, Stout-Vogel, Atkinson, Stout-Vogel, Atkinson, Ballance, Seddon, Hall-Jones, Ward, Mackenzie, Massey, War-time National Government, Massey, Bell, Coates, Ward, Forbes, Coalition Government, and Savage. The story of these successive Ministries was the main narrative ot j Mr Bothamley's distinctive career as i a trusted servant of them all. Other Activities

Mr Bothamley's activities were not confined to Parliamentary duties, how-' ever: In his time he was Acting-Regis-trar of the University of New Zealand, acting-editor of New Zealand Institute publications, acting Government meteorologist, acting Curator of the Dominion Museum, acting secretary to the Cabinet, private secretary to the Prime Minister, and representative of New Zealand at the Philadelphia Exhibition, where he was awarded a medal of honour. As an exhibitor of photography he carried off a medal in the Sydney Exhibition. Photography was a lifelong hobby with Mr Bothamley, but in his young days he was a keen oarsman, being founder and the first captain of the Tainui Canoe Club, which started in Wellington as a branch of a world organisation in 1880. When the Australian Association for

the Advancement of Science met in Wellington, he acted as assistant editor of its publications. "However, like Charles Lamb, who said that his chief works were in the journals of the India House, I think I can say," said Mr Bothamley, "that my chief works are embodied in the Journals of the Legislative Council." Mr Bothamley married Elizabeth, daughter of Mr Thomas Poulton, Leavesden, Hertfordshire, England, and there are four sons and two daughters of the marriage. Two of his sons are in the Parliamentary service, Mr C. M. Bothamley being Clerk of Parliaments, and Lieutenant-Com-mander G. F. Bothamley Assistant Clerk of the House of Representatives. Another son, Mr R. W. Bothamley, of Porirua, is well known in Wellington particularly in local body circles. The fourth son is Mr H. H. D. Bothamley, and the daughters are Mrs Reid, of Johannesburg, South Africa, and Miss Phyllis Bothamley,' of Wellington.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19381219.2.101

Bibliographic details

A DISTINGUISHED CAREER, Press, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22588, 19 December 1938

Word Count
755

A DISTINGUISHED CAREER Press, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22588, 19 December 1938

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