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NEW COUNCIL INSTALLED

LARGE AUDIENCE ASSEMBLES INVESTITURE OF MR R. M. MACFARLANE CONGRATULATORY SPEECHES The City Council chamber was filled to its capacity last evening at the installation of the new Mayor of Christchurch, Mr R. M. Macfarlane, and the new City Council. Many guests had been specially invited, among them members of both Houses of Parliament and former councillors. The reserves department had decorated the chamber with flowers in profusion for the occasion.

The whole audience and the councillors stood as the retiring Mayor, Mr J. W. Beanland, and the new Mayor entered the chamber, announced by the Town Clerk, Mr J. S. Neville. Mr Beanland wore the chain and robes of office for the last time during his term of office, and opened the proceedings with a call to the councillors to make their statutory declarations. Each councillor then stood and said: “I do hereby declare that I will faithfully and impartially and to the best of my skill and judgment execute the powers and authorities vested in me as a councillor of the City of Christchurch by virtue of the Municipal Corporations Act, 1933.” . .

The Town Clerk’s report containing the results of the election was formally adopted, and Mr Beanland then took off the Mayoral chain and invested the new Mayor, who took the oath already declared by the councillors. Retiring Mayor Speaks

Making his final speech during his terra as Mayor, Mr Beanland warmly congratulated Mr Macfarlane and Mrs Macfarlane on their accession to office. Everyone knew, Mr Beanland said, the work Mr Macfarlane had done for the city. He had been a councillor for some years, and had taken his part as a councillor and a member of committees. He was • now elected Chief Magistrate of the city, an office carrying with it responsibilities which Mrs Beanland and himself well knew. Mr Beanland said he was sure the city would have a man who would carry out his duties in the spirit and way they should be carried out. Everyone looked to the Mayor for help and guidance, and Mr Macfarlane would find himself extremely busy. Nevertheless, it was pleasant to know that things were better now than in seme past years, and he hoped that Mr Macfarlane would not have to do so much work for the relief of distress as had been necessary at some stages. He concluded with a wish that Mr and Mrs Macfarlane should enjoy a happy term of office. Mr Macfarlane was received with prolonged applause. On behalf of Mrs Macfarlane and himself he thanked Mr Beanland for his good wishes, and paid a tribute to the good services given to the city by the retiring Mayor and Mayoress. He also thanked councillors who had not been re-elected for the work they had done for the city. When there was a fight, someone had to go down in the fray, a fact of which he himself had had experience Democracy made its decisions and they had to be accepted. Tributes Paid As a councillor, Mr Macfarlane said, he knew the responsible wprk councillors were called -upon to do and the voluntary services they gave. The thanks of the city were especially due to two retiring members, Mr T. H. Butterfield, who had given many years of valuable service, and Mr A. G. Jamieson, who was a councillor for one term. Neither of these gentlemen sought re-election. Mr Macfarlane also paid a tribute to Dr. J. Guthrie, his opponent in the Mayoral election. He said he wished to repeat his statement that the recent contest was one of the cleanest ever conducted. He himself subscribed to the opinion of a former Mayor, Mr J. A. Flesher, that when two members of the council contested the Mayoralty there should be some arrangement by which the citizens could, if they desired, have the services of the unsuccessful candidate as a councillor. This was a suggestion which he thought might be seriously considered. Mr Macfarlane then spoke shortly of the main points of the Labour councillors’ policy. He assured the councillors that he would endeavour to be impartial in, his rulings, as Mr Beanland had been. He assured the citizens also that he appreciated the responsibility placed upon him. He wished to remain a man of the people, but he desired to carry out his duties as they should be carried out, and he trusted that the installation of the new council would go down in history as marking a new era of progress for the city. Mr Macfarlane Praised

Mr J. S. Barnett, a Labour councillor of some years’ standing, and Mr E. H. Andrews, a Citizens’ Association representative, who has been a councillor for 20 years, also spoke. Mr Andrews described the new Mayor as a keen debater, strong in his opinions, always fair, and never abusive. Dr. Guthrie, in a short speech, said he thanked Mr Macfarlane from his heart for his kind words. He said he did not recollect an incident in the election campaign which bore the slightest unpleasantness. He had emerged from the campaign with a higher opinion of his opposition than when he went into it. He said he had the utmost confidence in the new council. The proceedings were then concluded with the new Mayor’s invitation to councillors and the staff of the council to attend next Sunday evening a service at St. Matthew’s Anglican Church at St. Albans. This invitation was in accordance with the custom of the Mayor and council. The council .then adjourned until 7.30 pm. on Monday. Mr Macfarlane received his guests at supper.

OFFER OF CHAIRMANSHIP OP COMMITTEES AUCKLAND LABOUR MEMBERS REFUSE fHUSS A.B3OCIJLTIOW TZLBOBASt.) AUCKLAND, May 18. 'Although the Labour Party representatives on the Auckland City Council three years ago chose all the committee chairmen from their own ranks, the new council has expressed willingness to allow Labour councillors to occupy the chair on three of the council committees." This offer, according to Information gathered to-day, was declined on behalf of the party, and in every case non-Labour chairmen have been chosen. Three years ago, when the Labour Party entered the council with a majority of 15 out of 21 seats, it was stated by Cr. B. Martin, who was at the same time appointed DeputyMayor, that they were on the council definitely as members and representatives of a political party and that so long as they were there they would represent that political party. This was followed by the appointment of Labour members as chairmen of all •the committees, _ ,

MUNICIPAL COMMITTEES IN DJJNEDIN

(PRESS ASSOCIATION TELEGRAM.)

DUNEDIN, May 18.

After his installation as Mayor today, Mr A. H. Allen announced the personnel of the committees which will have charge of the affairs of the city for the next three years. Though the new council of 12 comprises only three Labour members, two of these. Dr. D. G. McMillan, M.P., and Mr J. W. Munro, M.P., have been appointed chairmen of two of the committees, the remaining appointments being conferred on Citizens’ candidates. The full list of chairmen is as follows; Works committee, Cr. Wilson (C.); water committee, Cr. Shepperd (C.); electric power committee, Cr. Cameron (C.); tramway committee, Cr. Gibson (C.); gas committee, Cr, McMillan (L.); general committee, Cr. Henderson (C.); reserves committee, Cr. Munro (L.); library committee, Cr. Borrie (C.); finance committee, Cr. Taverner (C.), a former Minister of the Crown. The mayoral honorarium was fixed at £SOO a year.

CEREMONY AT NEW BRIGHTON

COUNCIL AND AMALGAMATION PROPOSAL The installation of Mr E. L. Smith as Mayor of New Brighton took place last evening. Crs. J. N. Clarke, H. R. Macdonald, W. E. Wilkins, W. E. S. Furby, A. W. Owles, C. V. Lester, and W. T. Glasgow were also sworn in. Crs. T. E.> Thomson and J. S. Ainsworth were not able to be present.

The Mayoral chain was placed on Mr Smith by the Town Clerk (Mr C. T. Middleton), who expressed his personal congratulations and those of the staff, and wished the Mayor a successful term of office. , . The Mayor said that he hoped to have many happy hours at the council table. “I trust the spirit of harmony that existed in the past council will be present,” he said.. “As the Question of amalgamation will not be dealt with until the necessary legislation is passed by Parliament, the council will have to carry on with the work of New Brighton, and there must be no slackening in any of the work. The last council was remarkably free from notices of motion, which tend to hold up the business of the council, and I trust that this council will adopt a similar policy. “As Mayor, I will always give the council the fullest information on all questions, and do not intend to withhold information,” said Mr Smith. “There are some questions that must of a necessity be dealt with in committee, but my policy generally is to allow our electors through the press to have the fullest publicity.” The first meeting of the new council will be held on Monday next.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19380519.2.78

Bibliographic details

NEW COUNCIL INSTALLED, Press, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22405, 19 May 1938

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1,517

NEW COUNCIL INSTALLED Press, Volume LXXIV, Issue 22405, 19 May 1938

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