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LAWN TENNIS

-~- ' ■ —— WIMBLEDON OPENS ON MONDAY INTERNATIONAL RIVALS MEET AGAIN [By CROSS-COUaT.] The All-England championships at Wimbledon—the chief event in the European lawn tennis season—will commence on Monday, and as can be seen from the list of "seeded" competitors published on Thursday morning it has again attracted all of the world's best amateur players. Several important tournaments, including the French championships, have already been fought out this season between j 1 the best players from England, Aus- j tralia. and the Continent, but in the Wimbledon tournament a new factor will have to be reckoned with, the American Davis Cup team, which_ this year will contain some promising youngsters who have yet to make thenmark in world tennis. Chief interest in the tournament, oi course, lies in the men's singles championship, in which Fred Perry, England's leading player, appears to have an excellent, chance of being the first man since 1921 to win the title for two successive years. Perry has met and defeated convincingly all his most serious rivals this season—Crawford (Australia) and von Cramm (Germany) in the French championships, and Austin (England) in the English hard court championships —and he really seems to be even more dominant than he was in 1934.

Champion's Difficult Task

Perry had a very lean period in Australia, when he lost consistently to Crawford and to Australians of a lesser calibre, but he seems completely to have recovered from the effects of. the stalericw thai had so disastrous an effect on his same. Probably n more important factor in Prry's recovery is the settlement of doubts concerning nib future. It is well known that while in New Zealand last season he spent a good deal of time worrying as to whether he was doing a wise thing in refusing the many tempting offers that were made to him with a view to his becoming a professional. Perry, it now appears, has an assured future as a director of one of England's most important sports goods manufacturing firms, and there is no doubt that hewill bo a valuable ambassador for this | firm in Ihe world-wide tours he will ! undertake. j The lot of the defending champion at j Wimbledon, nevertheless, is an cxhremely hard one. Although the entry 1 is usually very large he can count on ; few easy matches, and more than one champion, including Tiklen and Cochet. ; have failed through inability to pro- , ducc best form against an inspired op- '■ ponent in a very early round. ! Voit Cramm or Crawford? , ■ Von Crainm has earned the right to be seeded second to Perry, although it : must be remembered that his line performances so far this season have all ' been accomplished on hard courts. Lit. ' has not so far proved as effective on i lurf courts as on the en-lout-cas, and I Crawford, if he survives his prelimi- ! nary trials—including Sydney Wood, j Iho American, in, the quarter-final may avenge the defeat he suffered at the hands of the German in the Davis Cup contest. Austin, at this stage of the season, is approaching his most dangerous form, but he is in Perry's half, and the latter is astute enough to Jake advantage of Austin's physical disabilities. There should be an interesting quarter-final between Austin and Willmer Allison, No. 1 player for the United States. If the results of the matches go according to the expectations of the seeding committee the quarter-finals, in order, will be as follows:—Perry (England) v. Boussus (France), Austin (England) v. Allison (United States). Crawford (Australia) v. Wood (United S'.ates), von Cramm (Germany) v. Menzel (Czechoslovakia).

The American youngsters are J. D. Bisdite and C. G. Mako, who are likely to be a more serious menace in doubles than in singles, although Mako has a victory over Perry in a minor match to his credit. Budy.e and Mako have been honoured with one of the four .secdinfis in the doubles, and if play in unaccumslomcd surroundings doc; not have too .serious an effect on their Same they should meet their American team-mates, Allison and van Ryn, who have twice previously won the title, in the semi-final. The other sernilinalists should be Crawford and Quist and Borot.ra and Brugnon. The lastmentioned naif held the title in 1032 and 1933.

Mrs Wills-Moody Kelurns

Interest in the women's singles is added by the participation of Mrs-. Helen WilLs-Moody after a lapse of two years. Her play in preliminary tournaments has not been such as to suggest that she will be able to repeat her old triumphs—she has won the title on no fewer than six occasions—but her form will no doubt improve with practice. Miss Dorothy Round will defend her title against a particularly strong bunch of challengers, including Frau H. Sperling (Germany), winner of this year's French championship, Miss H. Jacobs, champion of the United States, Mme. R. Mathieu (France), Misses K. K Stammers, and M. C. Scriven (England), and Miss Joan Hartigan (Australia). The quarter-finals should be:—Miss Round v. Miss Hartigan, Mrs WillsMoody v. Mine. Mathieu. Miss Jacobs v. Miss Stammers, and Frau Sperling v. Miss Scriven.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19350622.2.144

Bibliographic details

LAWN TENNIS, Press, Volume LXXI, Issue 21506, 22 June 1935

Word Count
846

LAWN TENNIS Press, Volume LXXI, Issue 21506, 22 June 1935

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