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THE ELECTIONS

MR SULLIVAN'S MAJORITY SUBSTANTIAL DECREASE CITY COUNCIL RESULTS NOT YET FINAL Substantial differences between the ciKcial and preliminary counts in the mayoral election were shown on Saturday afternoon when Mr D. G. Sullivan, M.P., was declared Mayor of Christchurch by the Substitute returning officer, Mr Albert Freeman. Mr Sullivan's majority was decreased from 578 to 329, suggesting that when the official count for the council election is completed, probably to-mor-row, there may be changes in the results sufficient to all'ect the membership of the council as at present indicated. Changes in Figures The detailed results of the mayoral election were declared as follows: — Mr D. G. Sullivan (Labour) . 20,006 Sir Hugh Acland (C.A.) .. 19,737 Majority for Mr Sullivan .. 329 The recount increased the number of votes allotted to both candidates. Mr Sullivan's total of 19,793 on election night went up by 208. while Sir Hugh Acland's total of 19.220 on The night of the poll was increased by 51.7. The number of votes was increased to a great extent by allowing many votes which had been classed as informal in the earlier counts to be included as valid. This was done where the votes were considered to give a clear indication of the voter's intention. The decrease from 578 to 329 in Mr Sullivan's majority is accounted for by several serious mistakes in the hurried preliminary count. Mr Freeman said that the mayoralty election showed more mistakes than any previous election in his experience. Tiiere were discrepancies of 100, CO, and 50 in various booths. One of the biggest changes discovered by the count was at the Colombo Street Baptist polling booth, where the final figures showed that 254 votes were cast for Sir Hugh Acland and 335 for Mr Sullivan, whereas the; preliminary count gave 390 to Sir Hugh Acland and 400 to Mr Sullivan. Strickland street was another booth where there was a considerable discrepancy. Sir Hugh Acland's vote there was reduced by 65 voles to 134. Sir Hiuih Acland gained a large number of votes from the check of the combined booths at the old Art Gallery, his total going up by 82 votes to 688, while Mr Sullivan gained only three. Other booths where the two returns showed large differences in the figures are given below. The earlier count is in parenthesis:--Rtmby street: Mr Sullivan 225 <27S); Sir Hugh Acland 804 '848). Lav/son street: Mr Sullivan 444 (423); Sir Hugh Acland 187 (183). Waltham Hall: Mr Sullivan 300 (323); Sir Hugh Acland 109 (90). Stanmore Road School: Mr Sullivan 346 (3(19); Sir Hugh Acland 245 '2211. Tuam-Antigua street: Mr Sullivan 258 (295): Sir Hugh Acland 384 '409). St. Andrew's College: Mr Sullivan 148 (115); Sir Hugh Acland 509 (508). Worcester street, City: Mr Sullivan 413 <410); Sir Hugh Acland 1325 (1418). Municipal Offices: Mr Sullivan 825 <820): Sir Hugh Acland 1465 (1444). St. Andrew's School: Mr Sullivan 268 (295); Sir Hugh Acland 411 (409). Approximately 1500 declaration votes were made, but the examination of these resulted in only 80 being recognised. Of these Sir Hugh obtained 43 and Mr Sullivan 30', while one was informal. Effect of Casual Staffs Mr J. F. Kames. the official returning officer, said that neither he nor the substitute returning officer were satisfied with the counting of the votes at the booths by some of. the deputy-returning officers. The proportion of mistakes was unduly high. However, the returning officers realised that it was a casual staff which handled the big poll, and that casual workers could not be expected to do the task as efficiently as more experienced persons. Mr Eames said that the policy followed in the selection of officials was to recruit the deputies and poll clerks from people who were unemployed. There were 4G6 deputy returning officers and nearly as many poll clerks, most of whom were unemployed. DUNEDIN MAYORALTY I'l'&Vlfl ASSorUTH)* 1 r.Mr.OKAf.f A DUNEDIN, May 11. The official recount for the mayoralty gives each of the .iree candidates increases due to errors in additions at the booths and to an addition to each c a small number of declaratory votes. The figures now are:— Rev. E. T. C. Cox (Lrbour) 12,215 J. J. Marlow (Citizen's) .. 10.425 R. S. Black (Independent) 5,268 Informal .. .. 210

LABOUR'S DEFEAT

REASONS ADVANCED BY MR A. E. ARMSTRONG EFFECT OF POSITIVE SYSTEM OF VOTING An attack on the Labour party for discarding the system of proportional representation 4 and for not co-operating with the radical element in the party was made yesterday afternoon by Mr A. E. Armstrong, a councillor for six years, who unsuccessfully contested the municipal elections as an Inde- | pendent Labour candidate. He claimed that the system had been thrown overboard in the desire to get rid of him personally. Although there were many interjections, Mr Armstrong received in general a good hearing from the 300 people who heard him speak from Edmonds band rotunda. He was accused from many quarters of inadvisedly splitting the Labour vote by going to the poll on the Independent ticket. Mr H. Macdonald presided. After a vote of confidence in the speaker and the other Independent candidates had been carried by a majority the chairman said, in declaring the meeting closed". "It is a tragedy at this stage to see | the ranks of the working class so obviously split. There should, for the municipal elections, have been a common ticket. We have before us a lesson for the general election, and I appeal to you to show a united front. _ ft is up to the Trades Hall to get outside and organise." Kadical Element Mr E. L. Hills, another unsuccessful Independent Labour candidate, spoke briefly, being subjected to many interjections. He said that the Labour party had turned a deaf ear to me radical element. whose votes had totalled 26,000. It must now .realise the necessity of co-operation with the Independent party. At this stage the speaker's words were lost m the noise, one voice being heard to exclaim: Who made you a radical? You don t know the meaning of the word." The chairman made a successful appeal ioi Mr Armstrong claimed that proportional representation was a fundamental Labour principle, and by "scrapping" it the Labour party had brought about its own defeat. Had that system been maintained Labour would have a majority on tne City Council, with seven Labour and two Independent Labour seats. It was thrown overboard because of tne aesire to get rid of himself. Against a persistent interjector the speaker argued that if he thought the Independent party had been wrong lie should call a meeting next Sunday and prove it. Labour Principles Mr Armstrong then referred to his removal from the council chambeis by the police "when he was endeavouring to get a hearing on a vital principle." His references to his attempts t.o make the maximum wage for a council employee £lO a week were frequent throughout his speech. He challenged anyone to prove that during the six years of his office he had voted or in any way gone against one of the principles of Labour. Charges were made by the speaker against the Mayor, Mr D. G. Sullivan, M".P., for an alleged remark at Woolsion, "Get rid of Tommy Armstrong, at all costs," and against the DeputyMayor for his actions at council meeting's. On the eve of the election, saic Mr Armstrong. Mr Sullivan had come out and said that the Labour party would stand or fall by the 40-hour-week proposal, a reform for which the speaker himself had for some time been working. . , , Some cowardly insinuations had been made about the origin of tne funds for his election campaign, said Mr Armstrong. Those funds had come from the workers, and were raised by honest and above-board means. His final remarks referred to the unauthorised use of his name by the Independent League. MR C. E. JONES'S HEALTH RUMOURED INABILITY TO TAKE SEAT DENIED The suggestion that Mr C. E. would not be able to take his scat >n the Christchurch City Council because of illness was emphatically denieci on Saturday by Mr W. S. MacGibbon, chairman of the Citizens' Association. Mr Jones was not able to address electors during his campaign, but in spite of this polled 19,414 votes. Mr Mac Gibbon stated that he had advice on the previous day that Mr Jones was making very good progress towards a complete recovery from his illness. As far as he knew there was no justification whatever for the rumour that n/r r Jon.cs would not be able to take his seat. If an elected councillor is not able to take his seat a by-election must be held. It is within the power of the council, however, to grant leave of absence and in some cases this has been given for periods extending over several months OFFICIAL COUNT NO IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES DISCLOSED YET The official count of the voting at the municipal elections was continued on Saturday up to 6 p.m., and w> not. be completed probably until noon to-day. The Acting-Town Clerk, Mr J. F. Eames, slated yesterday that although minor mistakes had been discovered, nothing had been disclosed of sufficient importance to alter the present placing of the candidates. TIE DECIDED BY DRAW FROM HAT I'i'.rjS A3SOCIATIOK TELEGU.V.V..I WHANGAREI. May 11. Mr Luke Webb, who has represented the Otonga riding of the Whangarei county for 18 years, and has been chairman of the council for nine years, lost his seat this morning when a tie between him and Mr G. Martin was by the returning officer mak.' lg a draw from a hat. During his 18 years' service Mr Webb missed only one meeting. • \VELLING TON RECOUNT ;raisS 4SS,ociJ.Tjo)i telegram.) WELLINGTON, May 11. The result of the recount of votes in the Wellington mayoral contest is to-day announced by the Chief Returning Officer as follows: — T. C. A. Hislop .. . • 21,583 R. Semple •• 19,249 Majority for. Mr Hislop 2,334 Informal votes ~ 307

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19350513.2.85

Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS, Press, Volume LXXI, Issue 21471, 13 May 1935

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1,661

THE ELECTIONS Press, Volume LXXI, Issue 21471, 13 May 1935

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