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RACING AND TROTTING

LATEST NEWS FROM FAR AND NEAR

.RACING FIXTURES

Peter Pan Latest reports from Sydney state that Peter Pan will be ta"ken in hand again shortly with a view to being got ready for autumn racing. He will not be nominated for the Sydney Cup, but will be restricted to the distance weight-for-age events. He may encounter strong opposition at a mile and a half, but it is predicted that the l'aces over two miles or further will be easy for him. Jumpers at Trentham The jumpers, Verden and Billy Boy, are again to be trained for a period at Trentham by R. W. Lewis, who will bring them south at the pnd of the week. Verden is to contest the highweight events at the Wellington Racing Club's summer meeting and will again be ridden by P. Thompson, who piloted him to victory at Ellerslie. The horses are expected to return to Ellerslie for the autumn meeting. Kival for Homer Young Idea, winner of the £ISOO Stradbroke Stakes at Flemington on New Year's Day, is credited with one of the best performances of a two-year-old this season, for he had to overcome very great difficulties in the running to succeed. This colt is owned in conjunction by two studmasters. his breeder Mr Percy Miller, of New South Wales, and Mr A. G. Hunter, of Victoria. He is by the Son-in-Law horse Constant Son from Persuasion, by The Welkin from Flowery Speech, by Cicero from Persian Lilac, by Persimmon. Bad Losers During a long association with racing I have heard men boosted as "good sportsmen" who had not the least pretension to that title (writes "Pilot"). The mere fact of having enough money to race a fe\v horses does not make any man a "good sportsman." Something more than that is necessary. I have seen so many of these so-called "good sportsmen" reduce their operations to a minimum, or drop out altogether, when the luck of the game has started to go against them, that, whenever I hear some individual lauded after a win, I cannot help querying: "Is he a stayer or merely a sprinter?" It all depends upon how he takes reverses. Juveniles in Australia It will take autumn racing to decide whether any of this season's two-year-olds are exceptionally good. Occasionally a youngster that stands out in the spring retains his superiority over the autumn, but this season there are so many of similar calibre that it is difficult to say what the autumn will bring forth. In Sydney the honours are with Homer, but it must not be overlooked that two lengths covered the leading six at the finish of the December Stakes, and Strathardale and Wise Boy carried penalties. Homer is of the type more likely to improve than either of those, but the next three months may also do a great deal for Gibson and Medallist, both of whom give the impression that later they will be better suited by six or seven furlongs than a shorter distance. Gay Lover and Golden Promise are preferable to any other of the Mel-bourne-trained colts, and the former may be the better. He did not run after the Maribyrnong Plate, in which he had a 101b penalty. Among the southern fillies, Bimilla and Theresa Gamba are good, and Cereza looks at least, the equal of any of her sex in Sydney. The Australian Jockey Club's summer meeting will decide which is the best of the two-vear-olds, and then there will remain the possibility of those on top being as disappointing at three years as Dark Sky, Great Legend, and Sir John have been this season. Kiflcr Disqualified The jockey K. Cool; did a toolish thing when he took Cherbourg in behind the leading section of the Bunncrong mile field at Kensington on December 19. There he had no chance, and it was this factor, no doubt, that convinced steward.-; in the enquii'.v which resulted in 12 months' disoualilication for Cook, and the ownertrainer, W. Bourke. and the horse. Stewards •.vent minutely over the volumes of all big bookmakers operating on the race in <heir search for evidence in this investigation. Cherbourg had not raced since the Ascot Clip ori December 5, and after a brief let-up had clone only pace work recently. Consequently he was not ready to show the good form he revealed some five weeks before, when he won the Kensington Handicap with 9-0 on his back. In the betting ring it soon became apparent that he was not fancied. It was a very poor field. Actually the only horse with form credentials was Cynical. It was the fact that a cot tain big punter laid out so much money fin this one horse which caused suspicion in the minds of tbe stewards that: the race was not. all it ought lo be. ile bcßan with I'.liOO to £2OO Cynical from Jim Hacked, and. went through the ring like a tornado gathering up the odds. Stewards must, have. m-I then-selves to watch closely alt contestants. Cherbourg dropped oul. but the pace- was so slow that he was able to impiove his position after five fi:; and made a run lhat put him in line for a place chance. Cynical had gone lo Ihe front, and had the race in safe keeping, but CherDourg kept gaining. Then in Ihe straight Cook took him behind the leading section, consisting of Cynical, Rogerson, and Meadowdale, and, of course, with no daylight ahead of him, he had to miss a place. Stewards began the enquiry, and adjourning it until next day, ordered the bookmakers' volumes in. They were determined to trace up the source of the big betting plunge. After hearing the evidence the stewards announced that they believed Cherbourg had not been allowed to "run on his merits," and inflicted the disqualification on the parties concerned and the horse. Cook is the best of the jockeys who came .from the pony courses, and had made good headway, securing rides in leading stables in the last six months. He did the riding for W. Bourke at Wednesda meetings, and on his horses Cherbc irg. Tironui, and Headmaster had won numerous races besides a number on Hope. His wins numbered 20 for the iirst half of the current season. Bourke had attained to a good deal of success in recent times with the cast-offs from other registered stables, and Cherbourg, Tironui. and Headmaster were of this number. The parties concerned lodged appeals with the Kensington Club I against the decision of the stewards. RJiHANDICAPS FOR WAIRIO j RACES |

January 19 —Bay of Islands R.C. ■January 19—Wairio J.C. January 22. 24, 26 —Wellington R.C. January 22—Ashhurst-Pohangina R.C. January 28, 29—Takapuna J.C. January 30, 31 —Egnnont R.C. January 31, February 2—Wairoa R.C. January 31, February 2—Wanganui J.C. February 2 —Matamata R.C. February 6—Tapanui R.C. February 7. 9—Poverty Bay T.C. February 7, 9—Taranaki J.C. February 9 —Canterbury J.C. February 9, 11—Rotorua R.C. February 13, 14 —Egmont J.C. February 1-1. <1G —Dunedin J.C. February 20, 21—Gore R.C. February 21 —Tolaga Bay J.C. February 22, 23—Woodville D.J.C. February 23. 25 —To Aroha J.C. P ebruary 27—Opunake R.C. February 2o—Waiapu R.C.

TROTTING FIXTURES

January 19— N.Z. Metropolitan T.C*. January 26—Timaru T.C. Januarv 31, February 2—Forbury Park T.C. February IG. 20 —Auckland T.C'. February 23 —New Brighton T.C. March 1, 2—lnvercargill T.C. March 2—Wellington T.C. March 9—Timaru T.C. March 9 —Marlborough T.C. March 13 —Wyndham T.C. March 16—Cheviot T.C. March 23—Wairarapa T.C. March 23—Roxburgh T.C. March 23—Auckland T.C. March 30—Thames T.C. March 30 —Manawatu T.C.

TURF GOSSIP

Wanganui Cup Nominations as follow have been rereived for the Wanganui Cup, of 250 kovp, one mile and a quarter:—Tiger Gain, Speed, Brambletorn, Davistock, Plateau. Eminent, Stitch, Fersen, Red Manfred, Passion Fruit. Pango, Bonrue Vale, Autopay, Aga Khan. Withdrawn from Sale The chestnut colt by Lord Warden from Michaela has been withdrawn by his Southland breeder from the yearling sale to be held at Trentham next week. The youngster will eventually race in Australia. Racing at Wairio The Invercargi.il trainer F. W. Ellis has a very fine record in races for the Wairio Cup. In 1928 he produced the winner in Queen Balboa, who broke the time record for the race up to that period, and another of his representatives in Bilbo was runner-up. The following year Bilbo won for th.e stable. while Queen Balboa was second. Ellis completed the hat-trick the next year with Red Sea. who made a fresh time record for the race, and King Balboa from the same stable was run-ner-up. In 1931 Ellis secured his fourth consecutive win when Poor Boy led the field home and also produced ■Night Rose for third money. Night Rose was runner-rup the following year and last season Venite filled third place. The stable will be represented in the Jubilee Cup next Saturday by Venite and Valiska, and Ellis has a great chance of enhancing his splendid record in the rare. L. J. Ellis and G. Humphries intend to be present at the meeting. A Costly Kidi: The day G. Richards rode his 200 th winner in England this year he did not benefit backers. It was at Derby, and. after failing on each of his five previous mounts, he finished the day by winning on a short odds chance. Although an easy first in the winning list. Hichards has been very costly to follow tins year. An lixpcnsivc I<uxmy Among the lady owners the most successful in England during tho recent flat-racing season was Miss D. Paget, with five winners of seven races, and £3538 in stakes, an amount that was less than half she gave for three yearlings in 1933. She has done better with jumpers than flat racers. Turn cf Luck R. O'Donneil, though an intelligent trainer, has never been a really lucky one—a fact that temporarily caused him to drop out of that calling after he left Sydney for Melbourne. However. he was not long away from it, and last season did well with Bardinet. Later that filly lost form, but; she returned to it on December 29, when she won the Mentnne Plate at Mentone. As Bardinet was well backed, a fair amount of money must have been won by those associated with her. She is by Tippler from Threcord, by Throf from Clariebord. by Civil. Bred by Mrs Hunler While, she was one of 'he few Tipplers sold at; thr 1933 yearling sales in Sydney. Mr A. Tyson giving 110 guineas for her. A Veteran New Zealand's oldest racegoer must surely be Mr T. McKay, father of a well-known southern racing family. Mr McKay, who is 99 years of age, was n spectator at the Invercargill meeting last week, occupying a seat in the trainers' stand. Back in Work Tudor, who brought, himself into prominence last winter by winning the Greenlane Steeples, the Panmure Hurdles, and the Tameiki Steeplechase at the June meeting of the Auckland Club, has rejoined L. Knapp's team. The Little England gelding is looking in splendid order, although his action behind has altered as a result of a flipped thi". 1 ' i'-uscle. Whether it will street his racing powers remains to be seen. Following on his failure on the northern trip, Callamart has been turned out and it is questionable whether he will be persevered with. At Awapiuii G. W. New Ims Beau Gallante and Aiguille in work and they have been nominated for Trentham. The former was to have made his appearance at the October meeting of the Wellington Club, but lameness overtook him, while his companion was being got ready for a trip to Auckland at Christmas time when he struck himself during training operations. Beau CJallante was taken to Australia in 1933, but he injured himself and was returned home. He has not raced since, but the handicapper at Wellington has awarded him top weight in the hack sprint, nevertheless.

Goins to Hcmington Although Australian papers a week ngo reported that Synagogue might pventually find his way to India, later exchanges name his purchaser as the Melbourne fielder, Mr J. A. Phillips. Mr Phillips did well in Melbourne with other New Zealand-bred gallopers, Gaine Carrington and Peter Jackson, winning the Caullield and Moonee Valley Cups respectively in the spring of 1933. Synagogue, it is stated, will uow enter C. T. Godby's stable.

iPRESS ASSOCIATION IELEGEAii.) DUNEDIN, January 14. Following are rehandicaps for the Wairio Jockey Club's meeting on January 19; — Woodlaw Hack Handicap—Queen of Song 9-2. Cup—First Song 8-10. Bates Memorial—First Song 8-11, Queen of Song 8-8.

TROTTING NOTES

Reminders Nominations for the Forbury Park Trotting Club's summer meeting will close to-day at 5 p.m. Nominations for the Timaru Trotting Club's summer meeting will close to--3 morrow at 9 p.m. i Nominations for two trotting events t at the Tapanui Racing Club's annual ' meeting will close to-morrow. ' Acceptances lor the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club's Royal meeting will close at noon to-day. Penalties As a result of her win at Hutt Park on Saturday Silver de Oro has been penalised 12 vards in the Royal Handicap at Addington on Saturday, and > will start from 36 yards behind. Moun--1 tain Dell's penalty of 12 yards will L bring her to 48 yards behind in the : Sandringham Handicap. ■ Sure I Sure came back from Auckland with i a better reputation than she had when ; she left Christchurch, and her runi ning at. Addington will be awaited with interest. Possibly the fields at Auckland were not quite good enough to test thoroughly the capabilities of ) the Southland-bred pacer, ■ but Elvo i and company will put her to the acid , test this week-end. Bulloch Lade Trophy ! The big attraction of Saturday's j meeting at Addington will be the attempt by Indianapolis to liftt the Bulloch ' Lade Gold Cup by lowering the pre- , sent record of 2min 2 2-ssec made by - Auburn Lad. The Wrack pacer is in great order and his mission will be ■ not only the Bulloch Lade Cup, but the . £250 held up for competition by the ' horse doing a mile in two minutes or better. While many consider Indianapolis quite capable of doing better than any horse has registered in New - Zealand up to the precent, the con- [ sensus of opinion is that Indianapolis . cannot break two minutes for a mile. A comparison with American records - is all against Indianapolis. He will , certainly be in the hands of an ex- ] pert in E. C. McDermott. who thort oughly understands the horse; but it I should be remembered the track cannot be given a special preparation such as was given when Worthy Queen and Auburn Lad made their ' l ecords. There are races to be run J before and after fhe attempt on the | record, and a lightning fast; track can- ■ not be provided in five minutes. Indianapolis, his driver, and trainer in ' the effort to win the Bulloch Lade Gold Cup have the best wishes of every trotting enthusiast: but the odds I are against the big gelding breaking . the existing record, and still longer ! odds should be on offer against him . equalling the record of two minutes. I If he succeeds in his effort his owner, r Mr G. J. Barton, his trainer, C. Dun- , leavy. and driver, E. C. McDermott, [ will be entitled to full congratulat tions. , Lilian Bond 1 Since her return to racing after a . serious accident at Forbury Park. Lil- ; ian Bond has not won a race; but she : is rapidly improving, and a mare that ; needs racing into form, she may sur- > prise at any time. Lilian Bond was • one of the best of her age last year, i when she was four years old, and she ' stood up to more racing than most i horses. R. B. Berry, her trainer, is patience personified, and 1 lie recent ; failures of Lilian Bond should not dis- - courage her supporters. i An Improving Pacer i Nothing trained at Addington looks - better than Morning Sun, a horse ' with long experience which is still carrying the bloom of youth that can be put on only by tiie trainer who , feeds well and knows his horse. It would not surprise to set- Morning I Sun in the hands of his young trainer, - A. Fairbairn, winning a good race in , the near future. Trotter Amon„ot racers \ Todd Lon/.ni showed :, t Ashbnrlon that it is quite possible for an \m--1 hoppled trotter lo compete with sue- " cess amongst, fair class pacers, and the exhibition he made, of Agile and others in the Midsummer Handicap l' should not. be forgotten. In this race he started from 3min 2fiseo over a mile and a 11;>((. and dirt .'imin 20see. . and he has only to trot, up lo ibis lorm to make matters very difficult j for the pacers opposed to him in the - Imperial Handicap at Addington on Saturday. At Ashburton, Todd Lnnzia could have improved a good deal ; upon the time he registered, and on that form he appeared to be one of " the greatest trotters New Zealand ha.-. produced. Auburn Lad Auburn Lad proved a big disap- ; pointment to his owner-trainer. W. t McKay, at Auckland, and the pacer ■ apparently lost all form by the time ■ serious racing commenced. Though nominated for the Windsor Handicap 7 at Addington on Saturday. Auburn Lad is an unlikely starter. j William 'l'cll I. William Tell, like 1 many i>l her horse ■, - i came from Southland with a rppula ! lion lhat lie has failed lo justify, and -- if his win at th<"' August nicetm;:, at. Addington may tie excepted, he has > proved rather an expensive disap- . pointment.. William Tell appears to have found his level in Canterbury circles. | Elvo 1 The most improved pacer in New 2 Zealand during Ihe last, .12 months is , the aged mare, Elvo, and her record t this season is an outstanding one, for ■ in 14 starts she has been seven times , first: and once second, and on her rej cent form her winning sequence has , not come to an end. Not registered , until 1932, when she was eight years old, Elvo made here first appearance . ill a race in the Lyndhurst Handicap ( at the Ashburton County Racing j Club's winter meeting, in which she : was unplaced. Early last, season she - started in three minor races without earning place money; but at the South j Canterbury Jockey Club's meeting ' she ran second to Garry Thorpe in ' the Washdyke Handicap, and later in ' the day won the Hadlow Handicap, of i a mile and a quarter, in 2min 45 1-5 j sec from a 3min 7sec mark. She then j went on to win the Melrose Handi- ; cap at Ashburton in 3min 20 3-ssec i from a 3min 42sec mark, and was third in the Mayfield Handicap. Later in ! the season she won the Levels Han- > dicap at Timaru, was second in the . Dash Handicap at New Brighton, won ' the Cheviot Cup in 4min 29sec, a course record, and finished up the season with two seconds and two ' thirds. During the year Elvo started 18 times for four wins, four seconds, and three thirds, and £476 in stakes. Elvo's record this season has placed her in much better class company, but on latest performances she is far from a spent, light. At the August meeting at Addington she was beaten a head by William Tell in the Advance Handicap in 2min 43 l-ssec. but was unplaced in the Lightning Handicap. After running unplaced in the Dash Handicap at New Brighton in September she won the Electric Handicap, a mile in saddle, on the sameday, and followed this up by taking the Methven Cup in 4min 32sec, Encounter and Willow Wave finishing in the places. At the October meeting at New Brighton. Elvo was twice raced without hopples—a rather remarkable happening in view of her previous form in the straps—and she failed to run into a place. She was again unplaced on the opening day of the spring meeting at Addington, but she won the Metropolitan Handicap in 4min 24 l-ssec, and the Lyttelton Handicap in 4min 25sec, two excellent performances, and at the Canterbury Park meeting earlier in the month she easily won the Au Revoir Handicap of a mile and a quarter in 2mm ' 44 l-ssec. and the Mason Stakes I-lan-j dicap of two miles in 4mm 25sec. | During the present season she has

WELLINGTON R.C.

ACCEPTANCES (PRESS ASSOCIATION TELEGSAM.) WELLINGTON", January U. The following are the acceptances for th< first: day (January 2'J) of til© "Wellingtoi Racing Club's meeting:

Cyclonic - • 8 5 ENGLISH RACING YKAU'S STATISTICS Cabled news gave us the til's! among English owners, breeders, trainers, jockeys, sires, and horses, but the actual amount credited each was in some cases omitted. English papers, however, furnish Cull particulars, and while the Aga Khan iinished at the head of the winning owners, King George was among those who had a poor year. He had three winners of three races of a total value of £412. The actual cost of those wins would make interesting reading. The Prince of Wales had one win for £192. F. Butters's stable earned more than three times the amount credited any other trainer, and G. Richards was 80 ahead of F. Fox, the jockey nearest him in the winning list. S. Oonoghne, with (>5 wins, did bettor than for several seasons, but B. Carslako dropped to wins against his 52 in K. Smith did much more rifling than any oilier apprentice, arid won ■'.!> out of tlw 502 races in which he figured.

won £1246, which added to her last season's winnings makes a total of £1722 in a little more than 12 months. Timaru Trotting Meeting For the Timaru Trotting Club's meeting on January 26, a special horse train will leave Christchurch at 6.40 a.m. and will lift horses at Addington, Sockburn, Templeton, Dunsandel, Rakaia, and Ashburton. The train will run to the racecourse platform, and will arrive at the course at 10.30 n.m. The return journey will start from the racecourse platform, and horses must be loaded by 6 p.m. sharp.

REASSESSMENTS

Reassessments of placed horses at the Vincent Jockey Club's meeting are as .follows:

SWIMMING NOTES

NATIONAL DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS THE CRITICISM OF AUCKLAND'S PROPOSAL [By FREESTYLE. 1 The events most subject to alteration at the forthcoming national championship meeting in Auckland are the diving contests, and the proposal of the Auckland Centre to have one of the rounds decided from a punt moored to a wharf in the harbour has drawn strong criticism from both Canterbury and Otago. The proposal has been favoured by the Dominion Council, which at its last meeting gave the Auckland centre permission to decide the second round in this manner. The Auckland Centre's action has been prompted by the fact that it is impossible to construct at the Tepid Baths, where the championships will be held, a high springboard offering safety to divers. It has also considered, apparently, that the holding of a.stage during the Annette Kellerman Clip race in the harbour, will be an added draw. The disadvantages of the proposal are several, although the suggestion is well-meaning. Its result may be that competitors may have restricted opportunities for practice, while there is always the possibility that the sea will be choppy. If it is, the motion of the pontoon, however slight, may cause a competitor to overbalance and thus spoil his dive. Another suggestion which is favoured in Auckland is that the high-board dives should be taken at the Mount Eden baths, as was done when the national championships were last held in Auckland in 1927. Although this seems fairer to the competitors, it. means that they are caused some inconvenience in having to practise their low-board dives at the Tepid Baths and their highboard dives at Mount Eden. The whole position is unfortunate, the more so because divers in New Zealand need every encouragement to raise the standard. They have a great handicap in not having suitable boards always, and it will be regrettable if such "a strong centre as Auckland can- J not make arrangements for the championship which will satisfy reason- j able competitors. |

Symes's Good Form The performances of D. H. Symes (Elmwood) at the inter-club grade competitions at the West Christchurch bath on Saturday were most promising, and clearly established him as the best short-distance swimmer in Canterbury this season. That, incidentally carries with it the reputation of being one of the fastest 100 and 220 yards men the province has seen. Tn the 50-yards event, he clearly established his superiority over E. McConville, the record-holder, to win, both men easing up, by three yards, in 25 4-ssei.\ At Ihe 25-yard mark ho was leading by a yard, and was swimming more easily than is his custom. Tie was higher in the water, and getting the most benefit from ati easy glide. He won, the 220 yards event as he pleased, with MeConville second. Symes's time, 2min IW 2-ssec, was 2 2-ssec outside his best. Symes, who has not reached his best form, hopes to reduce his time to 2min 27scc this season. if he can do this he will be a strong contender for Dominion honours at Auckland next month. Hater Polo The holidays have caused an undesirable check in the water polo championships, and those who hope Canterbury will retain its title as Dominion champion ai the national meeting hi Auckland next : month, will be glad to see an early resumption of play. There is every possibility that Canterbury will be represented, for the centre favours representation, and a .valuable start has ben made by Ihe Elmwood Club in opening a subscription list to help send the team away. Clay in the senior and .junior championships will lie resumed next Monday, with I lie second round. The draw is: - Senior—Christchurch-Uniled A v. Christchurch-United 13; East Christchurch v. Elmwood. Junior--Lin wood v. f'hristchurchIJnited: Beckenham v. Sydenham A; Phillipstown v. East Christchurch: Sydenham B a bve.

Fostering Junior Divers The suggestion made by Mr S. Hollander at Ibe last meeting of the Canterbury Centre, that a diving event should be provided I'or juniors at the Dominion championships, received the unanimous approval of the delegates present. The proposal is not now, but so far the Dominion Council has refused to inaugurate such an event on Hit: ground, il is said, (hat there are enough events on (he programme, and another, such as a dive, would be an embarrassment. When H. Tickl' 1 , Ihe Australian flivmt: champion, was in Christchureh recently he spoke strongly in favour of educating children in swimming and diving while they were still young. Clubs can, of course do lliis, but there can lie 111 He doubt that, the provision o[ a national, or oven a provincial championship event. would be valuable in bringing out boys who would be champions in the senior class in a few years. The standard of diving in this country should be higher, and any proposal that may bring about an improvement is worth a trial. Many swimmers will therefore welcome the Canterbury Centre's move In establishing its own championship for juniors, and will hope that this step will lead to the provision of a similar championship at national meetings. Canterbury Championships Entries for the Canterbury championships will close next Saturday. The events will be held at the St. Albans bath on the afternoon of January 2(i, and at the Tepid Baths on the Monday evening following. Championship dives for junior girls and boys will be decided at St. Albans.

TRENTHA M HIGH-WEIGHT HANDICAP of 200 sovs. One mile. M. lb. St. lb. R-ed Rufus 10 8 Knock Out 9 10 Haere Touu 10 5 Palatinate .. 0 10 Dorobey 10 5 Round Seoro 9 9 The Ark . . 10 3 Hot Stuff . . 9 8 Bold Jim .. 10 2 Wino 9 3 Verden 10 0 Otauru Ktn^ 9 0 Revision 3 0 0 Purse 9 0 Umpire {» 12 WELLINGTON STAKES. of :,00 ho\ Weight-for-age. .Five furlong?. Oolom bo Silver Wiugs H Duce Emissary Variant Bun Fight Burnish Galilee 1 'akn nui Limulus A bdicntion Per.i-dopn Motlmr Dahlia m S */v i:* ro Superior A PI' R [•; NT K • E S' PLAT E. o f *2 CO ,o\ s. .Special weights. Seven furlongs, Heather Glow Capita 1 Back Thru.-?! Hunting Bat,' Dark Red f>ialoa:ist Jubilee Soii£ I'ersen 11orot iu Ca wbeen, Gay Boy Calm Tapuvaiiui Host is FJTZliLRBLRT IIANDK'A 1.'. of 2 00 Ml\ S Five furlongs. st. 11'. rt. lb. Kotou 8 0 Eullo.ioy . . 7 7 Alolieimr 7 J 2 Going Gay 7 r> Oorroboreo 7 12 Nightlyss . . 7 ;> Heritage 7 1 1 Shirley Done 7 0 WELLINGTON CLT, 01 OOU sovs. One mi It and a half. frt. lb. t. 11,. Yintas^ 9 9 Tout le Monde 7 7 Gay Marigold * 5 Calieul e . . 7 0 Grand Jury 8 1 Rod Su 11 7 0 Red Manfred A Koekrt 7 0 Spiral 7 12 Koyal Artist 7 0 Cuddlo 7 10 Silver Sight 7 0 nUATM'JUU HACK. HANDICAP, of L'OO s Six furlongs. si. lb. si. 11'. Beau Gallanto 0 <! < 'O1<MIM» . . 7 7 Colossian . . 0 I Silly Ow I . . 7 7 Friesland . . s 8 ('up .Bearer 7 4) Brown Betty s 7 State Bank 7 Tunneller s 2 Sunee . . 7 :i Invoice * 2 Kpris . . 7 2 Travenna 7 Li Arou>n . . 7 0 Mnonh»>ain . . 7 1 1 Love in tinOrliy's Last 7 I 1 Mist g. 7 0 TELLGR.U'H HANDU of :ioo F r>\ s .Si\ furlong.-. lb JS t . lb. Aulopay . . '♦ 4 \\ lierik'i . , 7 7>iat<Hiioii5 . . s .1:; < ranford . . 7 12 Silver Streak 8 7 Lucid us . . 7 s Ivrri'il 1 u K 2 Star Artist 7 K Prinresv. Namakiu 7 r> Do roen s 2 Guarantee . . 7 w ANN 1 VLRSA K Y HANDICAP, of 2<>0 ovs. Ono 1 niie. si. U>. s t. 11). Krara.- . - 9 ;> 1 i<>ro v. hentia K -1 Kauu.'l •J I Aiguille . . H 2 Some Shamble : 9 O Trivet 8 0 Cherry King K 12 Ca rdinal Givat, Star . . ri 1 I Moon 8 0

Principal liuure: for ■ 1934, as tjivcn bv tlio r.onrlon "Spoilinu I. life," are as follow: - OWNERS Race: s Value. Won. a 11.H. the Aiui Ivban . 45 04,897 r ; Loi'd Glanelv . . 21 10,100..', U.I1. the Mahara.ia of Rajpipia !1 12,909 Bold Derby . . 28 12,71! Mr M. II. Benson 2 11.455 : ; Sir Charles Hyde 15 10,227 BREEDERS Races Value. Won £ TI.H. Iho Ami Khan . . 41 57,733.', IVir D. Sullivan 10 28,29;;.'. France . . 03 23,04().'. National SI lid 22 14,704 l.ord Dorbv !. -T 13,542', Sir Alec Black 10 13,507!. TRAINE1 IS 1 lace; ■: Value. Won i: Frank Buller.70 88,844.'. M Marsh 13 2,0 oo2 : ; J. 1,, .larvt:: 41 2I.20S ; ; J. Lawnnn .. :: l 2,1,104 M. D. 1'i i<;• 09 21.899 Captain C. Bovd-Peaci >ck ::i 21.41!) •IOC KEYS !sl. 2nd. 3i d. '1'olal. G. Richards 2 12 1 75 114 905 F. Fox . . 132 75 70 710 W. Neve It . . 100 07 57 511 R. Pcrryman on 77 03 495 H. Wrass .. 70 73 00 543 T. Weston - . 70 71 <5 574 SIRES No. or Race.- : Amount. Winners. Won Blandford . . 24 53 70.5)0 Tetratema .. 17 34 23,510.', Gainsborough .. 22 37 20.247.', Colorado .. 0 20 13.137.', Winalol . . 25 10 16,046 Manna .. 18 29 10,109 horse: Race: , Amount. Won ,s:. Windsor Lad ui.vry) 5 24.903.', Bahrain ('2yrsi 5 11,758 Felicitation i'4yrsi .. 5 9 255 King Salmon i'4yrs) 2 9,100 Colombo <3yrs» 2 0,097'> Umidwar (3yrsj 3 7,807

Horse. Table. Line Anthem .. 1 10 Daphne Queen .. 1 1 Erin's Chance .. 1 6 Glencree .. 1 1 Guywin .. 1 6 Southern Smile .. 1 9 Stalwart .. 1 5

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Bibliographic details

RACING AND TROTTING, Press, Volume LXXI, Issue 21372, 15 January 1935

Word Count
5,266

RACING AND TROTTING Press, Volume LXXI, Issue 21372, 15 January 1935

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