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ENGLISH DERBY

CONTEST DISCUSSED A TRULY RUN RACE (f'iluJl OCa OWN CORRESPONDENT.) LONDON, June 8. Last year the Gipsy Queen of Kent, "Gipsy Lee"' (Mrs Boswell) died; her last prophecy was that the year after her death the name of the Derby winner would contain the letter "W." Those who had profound belief in the old lady cast their eyes through the list several months ago, and found two horsey Windsor Lad and Umidwar, and backed them both. Last weak on the Downs a gipsy's crystal indicated that the winner would be the noble horse of a prince from the East, the name beginning with "W." That was quite definite. Sure enough, the prophecies were fulfilled, and not altogether unexpectedly, for Windsor Lad had been a tremendously popular fancy "each way"—no one could bear the thought of the favourite, Lord Glanely's Colombo, being beaten on the Epsom Downs, but he was, for he finished third, beaten a Length by the Maharaja of Rajpipla's Windsor Lad, and u neck by Easton, the French-bred horse which Lord Woolavington bought after he had run Colombo to a length in the Two Thousand Guineas, at Newmarket, in his only raco in England. The Maharaja of Rajpipla had all along expressed considerable confidence in his entry, and he told the public: "My horse is fit and well, and I have great confidence in him. With luck, he should be in the first three. I do not fear Colombo. He has not done what my horse has." Lord Glancly had said: "Colombo is a colt of the highest class; he is a great horse. Providing bad luck docs not come his way, I do not think he will ever be beaten." Colombo is a son of Manna, the Derby winner of J 925. The wary public, before making up its mind about the Derby winner, studies form and remains faithful only to the colts who have shown ability in public to go a mile and a half, the distance of this Epsom classic, which has an uphill start, a longish downhill approach to Tattenham Corner, and a four furlong straight to the post. The only horses in this week's field of 1!) who came within the category were Windsor Lad, Tiberius, Medieval Knight, and Alishah. Colombo's wins had been no longer than a mile, but he was reputed to have done the distance very satisfactorily in his work at Newmarket under the supervision of Captain T. Hogg, the well-known trainer. Until last Wednesday Colombo had never been beaten. He possessed a record of seven wins as a two-year-old, and two this year. However, the calculating minds, perhaps strengthened by the gipsy prophecy, liked Windsor Lad. and they proved to be right, though the race was extremely thrilling and interesting. The Winner \ Windsor Lad, a brown colt by Blandford—Resplendent, trained by Marcus Marsh —whose famous father, Richard Marsh, had trained for King Edward VII. and King George—had won, this year, for the Eastern potentate the Chester Vase (one and a half miles, on May 8), and had beaten a field of 10 comfortably in the Newmarket Stakes (one and a quarter miles) on May 10. Therefore, the owner was more than confident. A remarkable fact is that the excellent and popular sportsman, the Maharaja of Rajpipla, bought the horse as a yearling for the very modest price of 1300 guineas. He is the third foal of K'esplendent. who was sired by the sprinter By George! As a two-year-old he was not given I too much to do. Another remarkable fact is that in most of his practice gallops at Lambourn, Windsor Lad had been ridden by a girl —Miss Betty Higgs—and she knew he was as near a certainty for the Derby as there ever was! He had been working with King Salmon, last year's second in the Ep"om race. Mr Marsh gives great credit to the skill of his "trial" jockey. The actual aeld numbered 19, and those best liked were Colombo. Umidwar (the Aga Khan'i. Windsor Lad, Easton. and Tiberius (Sir Abe Bailey), behind whom there was considerable confidence. The Aga Khan had two other colts running—Badrudden and Alishah. All the horses were in excellent condition and perfectly cool. At the post there was only slight delay. Where Colombo Lost The account of the race given by "The Picquet" in the "News-Chron-icle" is interesting and illuminating. Ke writes:— How and why did Colombo lose the Derby? That is the question that the whole world is asking, for the cold fact goes down on the scrolls that Lord Glanely's idol lost by a length and a neck. . . From the evidence

of my own eyes and the evidence of several jockeys who had a "close up" of the incidents of the race, I will endeavour to explain the calamity and its cause. Donoghue, still the supreme master of the situation when he is riding in the Derby, jumped Medieval Knight off in front and took the best position. Johnstone, on Colombo, also struck off well and proceeded to go with Medieval Knight. Had he but known, he was being lured to his own destruction, for Medieval Knight was in effect the unconscious villain of the piece. Donoghue continued to lead, and at the crest of the hill Colombo had dropped back a little and Bondsman had gone just ahead of him. There were a few changes in the order as they went over the hill, with Medieval Knight still leading. Colombo had lost a little ground and Fleetwood had moved up suddenly alongside Medieval Knight. Tiberius was also there and "Windsor Lad was improving his position, as was Easton. When Fleetfoot had gone up to Medieval Knight he stopped and so did , Donoghue's mount. The latter was just in front of Colombo, and the favourite "received a check. As they made the turn, with Medieval Knight dropped out, Smirke saw an opening, and he dashed Windsor Lad into it, while Gordon Richards went with him on Easton. What the Jockeys Say Nicoll had then secured the rails on Tiberius. This all happened before Colombo had recovered from his check, with the result that Johnstone had to pull Colombo right out to the middle of the field. Some of the jockeys estimate that Windsor Lad had gained a full 100 yards on Colombo when they had settled down in the straight. Tiberius was not left long in command of the situation, and Windsor Lad went ahead of him. Colombo, racing by himself, was running on strongly, and Johnstone thought that when they were a furlong from home he was almost with Windsor Lad. He thinks that from that point his mount was weakening. He did not seem so to many persons. I thought that Colombo was running on strongly. He never got there with tho handicap that had been imposed on him at the turn, and he lost the Derby. Windsor Lad ran on like a good staver, and Easton, too ran on well. . . . It was a truly-run race in the good time of 2min 34sec, which equalled that of Hyperion last year. Aiishah was one who had bad luck, for Ferryman, who came off a sick bed to ride him, lost both irons when another horse gave him a bump at the top of the hill. He was nearly brought down, and travelled two furlongs more before he recovered them. Colombo gave the lie to nil the moonshine that has been talked about his temperament. Johnstone's "Inexperience" There are some who criticise Johnstone, the Australian jockey. One writes:— "The plain fact is that the inexperience of the colt's jockey cost Colombo the race. Johnstone is doubtless a fine horseman, but Just ask yourself how you would feel if called upon to tackle seasoned experts in a task which they had accomplished many times and you had done rarely yourself? In these cases an old head beats a young 'tin. What happened was that Steve, on Medieval Knight, outjockeyed Johnstone at a very critical , point, and the fact that Medieval Knight cracked soon after makes no I matter. But it was the turning point and probably made all the difference bc- ! tween Johnstone losing or getting home on the best horse he has ever ridden.

"While this crisis was developing. Charlie Smirko. on Windsor Lad, was pursuing a determined and prosper-ous-looking course. It may sound foolish to write of a winning jockey that he never did a thins wrong, but if ever such words are excusable they arc- in this case. Charlie, in fact, made a glorious comeback from a suspension which many persons think was over-prolon:,'ed." Smirke rode a brilliant and dashing race. Jtest of the Field The three placed horses were four lengths clear of Tiberius 'fourth), who in turn was six lengths ahead of Alishah (fifth). Valerius (ran well) was half a length off sixth. After an interval of a length came Umidwar, seventh: Patriot Kin?, a length away, was eighth; and Pride of the Chilterns, who ran remarkably well, was ninth. Primero, well placed nnt.il well in the straight, was tenth; Bondsman, unsuited to the course, eleventh; Medieval Knight, ran well for 10 furlongs, twelfth; Rathmore, running on, thirteenth; Badruddin, never prominent, fourteenth; Flcetfool, ran well, f.fteenth; On Top, sixteenth; and Admiral Drake last.

Admiral Drake is a Craig an Eran— Plucky Leige colt, belonging to M. L. Volterra; he arrived from France a few days previously. It seems that Lord Lonstlale had ventured the opinion to "Mcyrick Good," of the "Sporting Life," some weeks previously that he did not think Lord Glanely's colt would act well at Epsom. "He was right. In the preliminary canter it occurred to me that I might be in error in thinking that Colombo's style of galloping would be suited by the course. His action appeared all too high, and it was then that I first lost seme faith in this unbeaten colt." rocketed "Hotspur" ("Daily Telegraph") says the luck of the race was not with Colombo and Johnstone. "Colombo was running on at the finish, which makes me think he was not beaten because he could not stay the mile and a half. He was pocketed at the most vital stage of the race."

HAWKE'S BAY HUNT CLUB ACCEPT AN'CES (rltX33 ASSOCIATION TELEGRAM.) HASTINGS, July 17. Tho follow-in,- aro tho acceptances for the Haivko's Bay Hunt race meeting, to bo held aj Haslinjra on Saturday, July 21:--HACK AND HUNTERS' HURDLES, of 50 sovs. Ono milo and a half. Et. lb. 6fc. lb. Roya! Goshawk . . 9 3 Lineago 11 9 Anemometer 9 2 Luna Luk ..10 8 Heliotypo .. 9 2 Manifesto ..10 2 Kinross ..9 0 Gold Mas •• 9 12 Classlouffh 9 0 Ru.inui .. 9 7 Strorao .. 9 0 Kimbo .. 97 OKAV7A MAIDEN' HANDICAP, of 40 sots. I'ivu furlongs and a half. st. lb. ft. lb. Dai-ecourt .. 810 Kentucky Royal Sons 8 7 Banquet 8 10 Hornpipe .. S 5 Padishah .. 8 10 Trackman .. 8 5 Peter's Pence 3 10 Collodi.-.n .. 8 5 Unexpected 810 The Khedivo 8 5 Colludiaa .. 8 10 lather's Ulvgah) .. 8 7 Choieo 8 f> I.'oyal Solo 6 7 Black Ma~ic 8 2 Mer-ian Lady 8 7 Pony's Jov 8 2 Maine ..5 7 HAWKE'S BAY HUNT CUP STEF.PLEGHASE. of 50 sovs", and cup valued £lO 3 os. About two miles and a half. ft. lb. it. lb. CotsfieM .. 10 9 Mausin .. 9 0 Consent .. 0 1.1 Beau Rrjal 9 0, Coonoor . . y S Dozio . . 9 0 Baujuko . . 9 0 Hinetoro . . 9 0 Timipouri .. 9 0 RIVERSLEA HANDICAP, of 30 eovs. Ono mile, st. lb. st. lb. "Passion Fruit 9 8 . MrHoath .. 8 6 Host .. 9 3 Sabatini 8 2 Sir Nisei .. 9 1 Darecourt 8 0 Poniard . . 8 13 Lady Wesaex 8 0 Cuddla .. 8 7 Bold Bill .. 8 0

SOUTKA HUNTERS' TLAT HANDICAP, of ■lO sovs and trophy to value of five guineas. ct. lh. ~. lb. Anomomctcr 1L 8 Fit/-, tjupx 10 l'-> Autumn Sun 11 't Ifnkom.'imi 10 7 Goshawk 10 l:j Korv Jlnr 10 7 r.iina Lu.v 10 1J A'era I.u.v 10 7 W.UTAXGt HANDICAP. of 50 sots. Six furlongs. M. 1!.. it. Hi. Cav.-bcen ~10 0 JJ.ibitini 8 5 Host .. 0 0 Abbey Feale 8 :) lilac Boy 9 C Tareiia . . S Ti Sunny Royal Feast 8 2 Bachelor 9 '3 Pukchou .. 3 2 Hybiscus .. 8 r, Unexpected 8 0 Flamingo .. 8 5 Wahino Nui 8 0 TIKOKIKO HANDICAP, of 50 sovs. Six furlong 3 and a half. ft. lb. st. lb. Slippery . . 013 Cawbccit . . 8 5 Sunny Sky 0 7 Manifesto 8 2 Emotion .. 9 0 Mahora ~ H " Gainsftd .. 8 12 Tres See 8 0 Royal Bengal 8 9

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Bibliographic details

ENGLISH DERBY, Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21219, 18 July 1934

Word Count
2,109

ENGLISH DERBY Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21219, 18 July 1934

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