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RACING AND TROTTING LATEST NEWS FROM FAR AND NEAR

RACING FIXTURES. July 11, 13, 15--Wellington R.C. July 20—Waimate District Hunt. July 22—Hawke's Bay Hunt. July 22—Auckland R.C. July 22- South Canterbury Hunt. July 26—Rangitikei Hunt. July 27, 29—Poverty Bay Turf. July 29—Christchurch Hunt. August s—Poverty Bay Hunt. August 8. 10, 12—Canterbury J.C. August 16 —Egmont-Wanganui Hunt. August 19—Pakuranga Hunt. August 26—Taranaki Hunt. TROTTING FIXTURES. July 20— Waimate District Hunt (one event). July 22-South Canterbury Hunt (one event). Aueust 5. 9. 11—New Zealand Metropolitan T.C. August 26—Auckland T.C. TURF GOSSIP. Reminder. Nominations for the 'South Canterbury Hunt Club's rn.e,e.Ung. will close at 9 p.m. to-day. Work at Riccarton. The horses booked to race at Trentham this week were given their final gallops on Saturday, but most of them were restricted to strong work, either »n the sand or on the No. 7 grass. Zeebrugge and Heather Glow strode over five furlongs in lmin 4 2-ssec, the /last three in 37sec. Both should collect ■ stake money on the trip. Drum Fire reeled off half a mile, in 48 2-ssec, the last three in 36sec, while Jiis serious opponent in to-morrow's jrace, Errantry, was not asked to go tfast in recording 53sec for the same Hourney. This pair should be prominent at the finish of the Woburn Hack ■•Handicap to-morrow. Thurina, with his trainer in the saddle, covered six furlongs at a strong, even pace. He will be a fit horse after he has had a race at Trentham. Chief Light and Strong Light were let off with three-quarter pace work on the sand, and Tea Garden and Houslow were similarly treated. Bain at Wellington. Heavy rain set in in the Wellington district yesterday morning and continued into the night. The Trentham track will now be in a sloppy state and heavy going is certain to be in evidence for to-morrow's racing. South Island Stipendiary. The executive committee of the New Zealand Racing Conference, at a meeting in Wellington to-day, will consider the appointment of a permanent stipendiary steward for the South Island. Since the reduction in the number of stewards last year the work in the South Island has been carried out by deputies, but it has been found that the results have not been so. satisfactory as might be expected from a regularly employed official, and that the expected saving in expense was not effected. It is understood that Mr G. N. McLean, of Amberley, who was in the final selection with Mr C. Gomer for the position of chief stipendiary steward, will secure the position.

Fast Passage and Rebel Sons:. Fast Passage and Rebel Song can both be ruled out of the Winter Cup. The former does not show signs of standing up to a strenuous preparation and her definite retirement to the stud is probable. Rebel Song has had to be eased up owing to tendon trouble, and there is no chance of getting him ready to race at next month's gathering. The proposed trip to Sydney with the pair will be cancelled.

Chairman of Conference. Enquiries made in Wellington over the week-end elicited the information , that Mr A. T. Donnelly, of Christchurch, is practically certain to be president of the New Zealand Racing Conference for the new season.

Clangor Sold. The three-year-old gelding Clangor (Grand Knight—Anthem), has been sold out of Mr V. Riddiford's stable to a patron of H. B. Lorigan in Sydney, and he was shipped to his new home by the Wanganella on Thursday.

To Start Training:. The well-known horseman C. W. France is at present riding work at Trentham, and he will have the mount on Te Ua next week. France has practically retired' from' riding, but intends to apply for a trainer's license, having been promised several horses. He will train at Woodville, and will make a start with Mr H. Tupaea's Kahikatoa and Laconic, who have had a good spell on their owner's property in Hawke's Bay. Kahikatoa is reported to be looking remarkably well.

Gueress Reappears. An interesting runner at Trentham to-morrow will be the six-year-old Callaghan mare Gueress, who has been off the scene for nearly fifteen months. She was disappointing on the flat, then over hurdles, but at her first and only start in a steeplechase she ran a poor third to Pangolin and Mangani in the Marton Steeples in April of last year. Being by the same sire as Callamart, she may have good latent jumping possibilities about her. Father and Son. The Donoghues, father and son, were on winners at York (England), on May 16. Donoghue, sen., won a two-year-old race, and his son a welter. For the first two months of this season Donoghue's wins totalled 22, and he was next to G. Richards, though a long %vay behind that rider. yeilmond for Stud. Negotiations for the sale of Veiljnond for stud purposes in America are still pending and finality, one way or the may be reached within the next . few days. Veilmond, in addition to his excellent racing record, is such a good type of stallion that there probably would be little difficulty in selling him if the intending buyer could see him. Veilmond's stable companion, Killarney, who was presented by Mr E. Moss to Mr P. Miller as a hack, has gone to "KiaOra," and his next appearance in public will be in the show ring.

girc of Juveniles. In his later days Magpie is coming Into prominence as a sire of successful two-year-olds. This season he has had seven winners of that age—four in New South Wales, and one each in Western Australia, Melbourne, and Queensland. It is a development one does not look for in a sire well on in years, and should make buyers of Magpie youngsters at the recent Randwick sales hopeful of an early return of their outlay.

Waimato Hunt Meeting:. The handicaps lor the Waimate Hunt Club's meeting on July 20 will be declared about Thursday. The time for the closing of acceptances has been extended to July 15. Great Stayers. Two high-class horses in Orpen and Trimdon had a great set-to for the Yorkshire Cup, a two miles handicap of £IOOO, at York (England), on May 17. There were 12 starters, Trimdon carrying 9-18 and Orpen 9-4. A few strides from the winning post Trimdon led, but Orpen got up in time to beat him by a head, with the favourite, Taj Kasra. third. Butters trains Orpen for Sir A. Butt, and Taj Kasra for the Aga Khan. It is improbable he was thoroughly happy over the result, as only a few days earlier Sir A. Butt's Young Lover, at an outside price, won the Newmarket Stakes, for which the Aga Khan's Felicitation started favourite and missed a place. The result of the two races merely further demonstrated that it is not always possible for a trainer to be accurate regarding the chances of horses in his own stable. Silver Scorn Not Overlooked. Few mares have won the Melbourne Cup, the last being Sister Olive, as a three-year-old, with 6-9. That was in 1921. Acrasia won with 7-8 in 1904. Others successful were Auraria (7-4) and Briseis (6-4). This year special interest attached to the weighting of Silver Scorn, who is rated by many excellent judges as the best three-year-old filly ever seen in New Zealand. Applying wcight-for-age figures, the handicapper rates her a pound better than Peter Pan. Silver Scorn is honoured by the belief that she is as good as that, but it is asking a lot of her to succeed with 9-3. Wakeful ran second with 10-0, and was unlucky in striking such a good lightlyweighted stayer as Lord Cardigan. Silver Scorn may be another Wakeful, but, with her weight, it might be wise to leave her alone until she has run in weight-for-age races in Sydney. The Australian Jockey Club handicapper also deemed it inadvisable to take any risk with Silver Scorn, and with 9-8 in the Epsom, and 9-6 in the Metropolitan, it is improbable there would have been any rush by Sydney racegoers to support her. She has since been scratched. Ashbnrton Point-to-Point. Entries for the Point-to-Point steeplechase meeting of the Ashburton branch of the Christchurch Hunt Club close to-morrow at Ashburton. TRENTHAM NOTES. SATURDAY'S GALLOPS. UT.33S ASSOCIATION TELIi.'iH.Y:.!.) WELLINGTON, July 8.. A heavy fog following a hard frosi delayed the start of work at Trentham this morning till after 9 o'clock. The weather was beautifully fine and the tracks, though still on the easy side, were the best they have been for two months. Several visitors arrived yesterday and their work attracted most attention.

Last but not least of the workers were the steeplchasers, and five horses went over five fences of the steeplechase course (sod wall, first boards, second boards, big brush and third boards). All except Billy Boy pleased. Make Up (W. Rennie), Tunbridge (A. Jenkins), and Billy Boy (D. J. Burgess) were first to school. Make Up and Tunbridge soon drew clear, and after Make Up had nearly baulked at the fourth fence, Tunbridge outjumped him'at the last. Both fenced well but Billy Boy's display was not good and he finished some lengths behind them. Valves (W. Hogan) and Quinopal (G. Dempster) likewise jumped five* fences. They finished together. Valves fenced well, but Quinopal was inclined to get in too close. One of the best displays over smaller fences was that of High Grader (Rennie), who gave a stylish exhibition of fast, clean jumping. Pahu (L. Dulieu) and Paleta (H. Dulieu) also jumped a flight of three pleasingly. Vitaphone (P. Burgess) finished two lengths in front of Cape Town (JenTcins) with Joie de Val (H. Dulieu) some way behind. After a run over three fences King Comet (D. J. Burgess) went over a schooling flight twice, improving on the second run. Solanio (Burgess) Jumped a flight carefully and without a mistake. Paddon did the round journey only, and Gold Knight also was not schooled. The Gallops. The trial grass was used for fast galloping, and it provided good going. It was soft and a little heavy round the top. Cardinal Moon finished a neck in I front of Taura Lad at the end of six furlongs in lmin 20Jsec, the last half in 53jsec. Normandy ran over the same distance, alone in lmin 18Jsec, the last half in 51J sec, a good effort. Slippery, who looks in great heart, was doing it easily half a length in front of Colossical at the end of three furlongs in 39sec. Secrecy finished three lengths ah'ead of First View after running five in lmin 4Jsec, the last half in 51sec. Korero just beat Protomint over the same trip in lmin B£sec, the last half in 53sec. Gold Arrow was a length too good for Misgive, over half a mile in 50sec. Milnrow just beat Dignified March over the same distance in 50Jsec. Te Ua went well to beat Shootist by two lengths over six furlongs in lmin 19 l-ssec, the last half in 53sec. Palace was picked up by Fusim at the three, and ran five furlongs in lmin 6isec. Cottesmore, after doing it easily at first, had to be pushed to catch Epigram at the end of six furlongs in lmin 19sec, the last half in 52sec. All Humbug and Stanchion came away from Miladi at the end of six furlongs, the second-named winning the trial comfortably by half a length in lmin 19sec, the last half in 52sec. All Humbug is to start in the Whyte Handicap, and will be ridden by L. G. Morris, who, it is understood, will pilot Beaconfire in the Stewards'. Chile and Redtop, with Aroma, ran an easy six furlongs in lmin 24sec. Water Power, after the worst of the start, beat High Sj >ed by a length over six furlongs in lmin 21|sec, the last half in 52sec. Manawhenua and Tavern Knight, who also arrived yesterday, were not galloped fast. No scratchings have yet been made, but Auckland visitors state that Speedmint and Neil are not coming. DISQUALIFICATION OF HORSE. APPEAL UPHELD. (iW'ITED TRESS ASSOCIATION'— OF KI.ECTZIIC TELEGRAM!— COPYRIGHT.) (Received July 9, 8.20 p.mj MELBOURNE, July 9. Mr W. Markley's appeal against the disqualification for two years of the racehorse Spherical was upheld by the Victoria Racing Club committee, and the disqualification removed. The committee expressed the opinion that the horse had been doped by somebody on June 3, but it was unable to say by whom, and therefore gave Mr Markley the benefit of the doubt. I

TROTTING NOTES. Reminder. ( Nominations for the trotting event at the South Canterbury Hunt Club's meeting will close at 9 p.m. to-day. Nominations for the New Zealand Metropolitavi Trotting Club's August meeting will close on Thursday at noon. Monday next is the date of forfeit in the New Zealand Champion Stakes i Ashburton Trotting Club) and the Derby Trial (Oamaru Trotting Club). Young- Material. F. Holmes has just broken in two rising two-year-olds, a brother to Eugene de Oro and a sister to the North Island performers Donurn and Free Logan. Both these youngsters, are by Rev de Oro from Logan Pointer mares. Horse For Addin^ton. J. J. Kennerley, who is fast building up a strong team, will in the J near future receive another acquisition to his stable, the North Island pacer Carnui having been purchased by the Addington trainer. Carnui is an aged gelding by El Carbine from Papanui Bells. He has won several i races at Alexandra Park, Auckland. Tasmanian Champion. ,Wild Flame, the present champion pacer of Tasmania, is building up an excellent record, his total of wins having now reached 16. while he has been second nine times, and on 13 occasions has filled the minor place. Stake-money in Tasmania cannot be compared with that offered in NewZealand; but Wild Flame has earned a few pounds less than one thousand in his successes. Commencing his career on May 26, 1928. Wild Flame has won all his races in saddle, and his owner-trainer, J. Ward, has ridden him to victory in all cases. On June 10 last he registered 3min 26 4-5 sec for one mile and a half, establishing a new Tasmanian record for the distance. Track Notes. Addington is commencing to assume a busy appearance again after a period of slackness when there was little work of any note completed. On Saturday morning there was a large number of horses worked, but anything but severe tasks were enacted from the majority. The track was in very good order, and later in the morning training conditions were all that could be wished, after the heavy frost. The New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club is usually fortunate as regards weather at its August meeting, and providing the weather remains fine the course will be in ideal condition next month. Big; In Condition. Royal Silk bears a much too robust appearance to suggest that he will be at his best for the opening of the August meeting, but that he is more forward than indicated ho proved by the way he ran home the final two furlongs to conclude an essay over a circuit in company with his stablemate Gold Countiy. K. B. Berry's Team. Giving considerable starts to Checkers, Lord Leslie and Matchmaker. Colorado failed to overhaul Checkers by the time a mile and a half had been left behind by Colorado in 3min 26 2-ssec. He travelled faster over the final four furlongs than at any other stage to record lmin 6sec. Assuming Racing Shape. Free Advice, who is still big. but is fining down nicely, was sent over a mile and a half with General Wrack, the mare being in front all the way to clock a little faster than 3min 30sec. A similar task was allotted Indianapolis, who completed the distance in three seconds faster time. Even Pacework. Starting five lengths ahead of John Jinks from the mile and a half post, Stanley T. led throughout to maintain an even pace all the way and record 3min 35sec for the distance. Improving Novice. Clem Dawe trailed Thornv/orthy until the straight was reached, and drew level to finish on terms with the pacemaker, their task being of a mile and a half in 3min 33sec, the last mile in 2min 18 2-ssec. Clem Dawe has shown pleasing improvement since having been taken in hand by J. J. Kennerley. Solid 'Exhibition. A solid exhibition of trotting was given by Winsome Laddie, who appears to have shown a good deal of improvement during recent weeks. Margaret Chcnault was sent over a mile and a half, taking 2min 13sec for the final mile. RACING IN OTAGO. THE SEASON'S STATISTICS. [THE PREBB Special Serrice.] DUNEDIN, July 8. During the 1932-33 racing season in the Otago district bounded on the north by the Waltaki river and on the south by the Mataura river the racing clubs gave £18,577 in stakes, as compared with £17,977 in 1931-32, £21,564 in 1930-31, and £29,290 10s in 1929-30. Of the amount given this season £2177 was allocated to light harness events, leaving £16,400 for the racing events. The totalisator turnover also shows an increase, £189,421 10s having been handled, as compared with £175.877 last season, £192,985 10s in 1930-31, and £325,442 in 1929-30 season. Silver Scorn's successes in the Dunedin Cup and Hazlett Memorial easily place hc-r at the head of winners with £905. Fair Weather, who was just beaten in several of his races, is next with £475, then follow Shatter £465, Kerbside £447, Amy Johnson £235, Water Power £285. Valves £285, The Mosgiel Park owner-trainer, D. P. Wilson, has had a most successful season, and heads the list of winning owners with £l2ll. Mr G. MurrayAynsley with £915, Sir Chas. Clifford £655, Messrs J. M. Samson £544, A. E. Wormald £5lB, A. N. Smith £495, H. A. Knight £470, and R. M. Greenslade £435 are next on the list. Other Canterbury owners well up in the list are Messrs A. S. Jones £360, P. T. Hogan £320, J. Cordner £275, Cambridge and Bowker £270, R. Mcllwraith £255, and A. Louisson £255.

The list of winning sires is head by Faper Money, 18 of his progeny having won £1668 10s. Tractor, 13, £ISBO, and Paladin, 10, £1230 10s are the only others to reach the four-figure class. D. P. Wilson having turned out 16 winners was the most successful trainer, F. Shaw being only one behind him. The Canterbury trainers who did best were S. Barr and P. T. Hogan, each seven, H. and A. Cutis and T. Hobbs, each five, and A. E. Wormald, four winners. A. E. Didham and D. O'Connor shared the riding honours, each having ridden 12 winners, one more than J. W. Dooley. B. H. Brodie and L. J. Ellis, with eight each, are next. The most successful Canterbury horsemen were A. H. Eastwood and W. H. Jones, each seven, A. E. Ellis six, and J. W. Jennings five winning rides.

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RACING AND TROTTING LATEST NEWS FROM FAR AND NEAR, Press, Volume LXIX, Issue 20903, 10 July 1933

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RACING AND TROTTING LATEST NEWS FROM FAR AND NEAR Press, Volume LXIX, Issue 20903, 10 July 1933

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