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HEARTH And HOME

(By "Builder.")

"Builder" invitos contributions from readers on any matters of interest which they might like to propose. Correspondence on various subjects pertaining to building will also be accepted. NOTES. A big drop in Hawera building- returns for the twelve nionths ending December 81st, 1930, is noticeable when compared with the preceding calendar year. Twenty-nine fewer permits were issued, and the estimated value of the work decreased by £8256. The drop is largely accounted for by less expenditure on dwellings. There was no marked diminution in the number of building permits issued in Auckland in 1930, but many appertained to 6mall renovating works. Fewer large contracts than usual have been executed in .the city recently, while both in the city and in the suburbs there has been a large shrinkage in the permits issued for the erection of dwellings. Whereas 1163 houses were built in the Greater Auckland area in 1925), and 11G0, a curiously similar total, in 1928, last year's aggregate was only 436. For the purpose of completing additions to the Victoria Hospital for Chronic Invalids, and the new mortuaiy, the Wellington Hospital Board proposes to raise the sum of £22,300 at 6 por cent. Part of this amount will go toward the cost of additions which have already been made to the JBwart Hospital for Consumptives. The formal resolution, making application to the Loans Board for its sanction to tho borrowing of tho money, was passed at its last meeting. In replying to a question by Mr W. Colo, the chairman of the Hospital Board, Mr P. Castle, said that tho additions to tho Victoria Hospital were estimated to cost £13,000. The new St. Paul's Ohuch, Napier (.destroyed by the earthquake), which was constructed in brick, Oamaru stone, and concrete, to take tho place of the old wooden church destroyed by fire some-months ago, was only recently completed. It was one of the handsomest church buildings in tho Dominion, the lofty spire being a feature. Its appearance was one of imposing and stately dignity and beauty, and placed as it was on an eminence on the side of one of Napier's many hills, it was a landmark for visitors entering the town from the south. The art sta,ff and students of the Wellington Technical College have especially pleasurable terms ahead of th«m *this year, for in a fow weeks' time the new art school at Mount Cook will be ready for occupation, and tho cramped and. in other ways unsuitablo quarters in Mercer street will be at long last forsaken, and for good. The new building, for which Messrs Macmillan Brothers are the contractors and Messrs Swan and Gray Young the architects, is a handsome addition to the main Technical. School buildings, and brings the scheme for the whole of the college buildings one step nearer completion.

I "It is too early to say how our enrolments, will compare with those for last year, but present indications are that the numbers will not be less, at any rate," said Mr J. H. Howell, principal of the Wellington Technical College, at the last meeting of the Board of Governors. "There has, however, been considerable change in the enrolments for the diflerent courses. The enrolment in the building trades, for example, is much smaller than for a number of years past. This is no doubt accounted for by the fact that at present the building trade is suffering severely from the depression, but it should be borne in mind that by the time* boys who are entering on their course now have completed their training conditions wil} probably be very different, and tho demand for qualified boys much greater."

, "I have to report that the contractor is able to give us the rooms on the west wing, other than these in.the art school, inalpdina the staff common room, the two drawing offices for engineering and building, the two lecture rooms, and the mechanics' laboratory; and expects to be able to hand oyer the art schooj to us within a fortnight," stated Mr J, H. HowelJ (Director of the Wellington Technical College) at the last Board meeting. "I propose to transfer all commercial classes to the new college at'the opening of school, and to confine the work at the old build jnga to the art department only, and so to arrange the programme of work that no transfer of olassea between the two buildings is required. I need not say that it will add greatly to the smooth working of the school to bring all commercial classes to the new college." The Minister for Works in the New South Wales Cabinet. (Mr Davidson) recently suggested to a deputation of stonemasons that the construction of new and monumental Houses of Parliament in Government House grounds might absorb unemployed members of the Union. The deputation approached the Minister with the followwig proposals :~That another storey should bo added to the Lands Department Building; that the Mitchell Library should be completed; that stone kerbing at University Grounds should be completed; that city railway offices should be constructed: and that the stone wall near the Quarantine Station at North Head should be completed.

The question of apprenticeship m the building trade in New South Wales affects not only boys apprenticed as painters and decorators, but all building trade apprentices, simply because of the general slackness of trade. The position has arisen where employers are being compelled to seek the permission of the Arbitration Courts to stand their boys down. Whilst this action may give relief to the employer, it does not get over the difficulty of throwing a boy into idleness just at » time when he should be fully occupied. So serious has this question become that th© Master Builders' Federation of Australia at its recent conference discussed the matter, but unfortunately was unable to put forward any constructive schema to overcome the trouble. The idleness of boys was deplored, but no way out of tbe diffioultv could be, found, except by attendance at Technical Colleges or trade classes during their unemployment. This, to some extent is the rule in Queensland, where the Act « administered by committees represent; ing the employers and employees in the various trades, and where the boy is required to attend the Technical College mainly for intensive and theoretical training during the employer s as well as his own time.

MASTER PAINTERS.

DOMINION CONFERENCE. MANY IMPORTANT REMITS. Messrs G. Scy, D. Lee, P. J. Foate, and C. Lilleyman will represent tho Canterbury Association at the annual conference of the New Zealand Federated Master Painters', Decorators', and Signwriters' Association, which will open in Auckland on February 28rd. Whilst so many other organisations are finding it difficult to hold their -conferences this year (says tho "New Zealand Decorator"), it is pleasing to be able to report that tho forthcoming Federation Conference promises to be one of the most successful which has yet been held. Tho various affiliated Associations will be represented by their full number of delegates, and tho agonda will be a lengthy one, with sovoral very important remits for consideration. The following arc the principal remits: — Wellington Association: That tho Federation seok tho corporation of tho fedorations of tho various sub-trades in a strong effort to induce the Government to onact a law better to protect their interests than is dono under tho Wens Act, in tho following manner—"No moneys shall bo paid out in respect of progress and final payments on Government, local body, and private building contracts, or by way of mortgage on buildings in courso of construction, unless the claim or certificate shows the proper portions to bo allocated to tho various trades and to enable payment to bo made direct to each sub-contrac-tor concerned. It shall be illegal for a builder to collect moneys owing to subcontractors without their written consent." 2. That tho Conference thoroughly examine the steps taken up to date to havo tho Wages Prfitection and Con. tractors' Lions Act amendod in the "directions sought, with a view to prosecuting the proposal in order that the past efforts should not bo wasted. 3. (a) That for the painting portion of a contract, separate tendorß bo made direct to tho architect, (b) That provisions bq made in the tendor for an allowanco to the building contractor as compensation for use of the facilities, such as scaffolding, etc., provided Uy him. (c) That proportionate progress payments bo raado to | the painter as tho work proceeds, in terms of tho general conditions of contract. 4. That«. steps bo taken to secure in amendment»of tho Bankruptcy Act to make it compulsory for an insolvent trader to file a petition in bankruptcy. 6. That the public should be made parties to tho Master Painters' Award. Note; The Wanganui Association haß reason to believe that a house agent employs a painter to do Uis work and that tho painter is in receipt of less than award wages. , ' 6. That the question of payment of double premium in the matter of in* surance of apprentices be lookod into by tho conference, with n view to recommending a reduced scale of premium. 7; That tho conference be asked to express strong disapproval of tho drastic proposals contained in the Workers' Compensation Act Amendment, 1930, the giving effect to which would press hardly on the employer of to-day. 8. That the giving of a half-holiday on election day bo abolished, and the following arrangements obtain:—Evory eroployor shall afford to each of his employees, who is an elector a reasonable opportunity for recording his vote, and no deduction shall be made from the wages of any such employee in rospoct to the time occupied in so recording hiß vote, provided that »uch time doos not exceed one working hour. 9. That f ?oronco be asked to express an opinion as to tho desirability of curtailing bank holidays. Tho numerous occasions on which the banks' are closed aro distinctly inconvenient to all sections of the business community.

Wellington Association. 1. That not more than £SO capitation fee be paid by any affiliated Association to the Now Zealand Federation of Master Painters, even though the financial members exceed 100 members, 2. That tho wallpaper manufacturers 1 written to asking them if it is possible to print in tho selvedge of wallpapers a distinguishing mark slurring the correct match of same, also tho shading of papers. 3. That the time is now opportune for the Now Zealand Federation of Master Painters to recommend each affiliated association approach the wholesale merchants in their centre for a concession on white lead, and raw and boiled Unseed oil to financial members only of each affiliated association. 4. That the New Federation of Master Painters recommend to the affiliated associations that a full hour be taken for the luncheon adjournment during the summer time. Auckland Guild: 1. That the Government be urged to reconsider its l ecision to exercise the j j.' .lit to withhold from unsuccessful tenderers the prices of successful tondors in connexion with goods supplied to the State, also any contract work undertaken; . '2. That wo view with alarm the ac- . tion of the Auckland Modernising Society, inasmuch as in the opinion of the guild it is having an effect detrimental to the idea for which the said Society was promoted. 3. Standardisation of English wallpapers, 4. Period of responsibility of "painters re maintenance of work in connexion with paint discolouration and deterioration. Palmerston North Association: That "suburban work," which is at present 1$ miles, be altered to "three miles ftom his employer's placo of business. Christchurch Association: That this conference write to the Institute of .Architects and guilders' Associations, pointing out the disadvantages of the use of resinous timbers for outside doors and sashes, and requesting the discontinuance of such woods, and that timbers of a nonresinous nature be used in their place. Otago Association: That steel sash manufacturers be requested, so to place holes in sashes as to fit the thickness of glass specified to be used. - .. ■ / Other matters also will be considered, amongst them being a circular letter from the Director of Education, enclosing for consideration and comment a syllabus of the proposed technological examinations in painting and decorating,

HAWKE'S BAY.

BUILDING IN 1930. NEW EDUCATIONAL STRUCTURES. The past year, though a, fairly busy one in the building and decorating trade in Hawke's Bay, was not so good as 1929, which was a somewhat abnormal year. Permits issued for buildings in Napier during 1930 had a total value of a littlo over half that for 1929. Inclusive of the value of public buildings (which aro not recorded-* in the City Council's figures), tho figures for the year just ended were £129,642, against £203,275 for 1929. A boom was experienced in 1929, accounting in a great measure for the excess of that year's values over those of 1930. There was probably during 1930 a greater amount of repainting and renovation of old buildings than dur-, ing any year for a considerable period, so that on the whole work in the building and decorating trades was fairly steady throughout the year. Tho total value of permits issued by the Napier City Council during 1930 was £97,642. To this figure must be added £17,000 for the new Girls' High School and £ 15,000 for the new Technical College, bringing the total up to £129,642. In 1929 the permits issued by the Council had a total valuo of £148,275, to which must be added £55,000 for the new Post Office, making a total of £203,275. The total value of work authorised in 1928 was £104,958, which shows an excess of £7316 over the figures for 1930. A total of 208 permits was issued last year by the Council, the figures showing a drop of 19 on tho total of 227 recorded in 1929. Permits issued in 1928 numbered 213, in 1927 the total was 229, in 1926 it was 293, and in 1925 it was 312. Erection of Dwellings. The great decrease in the building activities during the year, was in tho erection of dwellings. For theso only 39 permits were issued during the year 1930, which was 1 the same as in 1929, but these figures are small as compared with 91 in 1923, 91 in 1924, 80 in 1925, 79 in 1926, 60 in 1927, and 46 in 1928. The building trade in, Hastings for December showed a decided falling-off, 11 permits of a total'value, of £1313 boing issued, as against 15 pormits.of a value of £3710, in December, 1929. •A total of 171 permits had boen issued since April Ist, of an aggregate value of £55,-246. In tho corresponding period in 1929, 237 pormits of an aggregate value of £131,474, wore issued. The year's building operations in the borough of Dannevirke showed a decrease, practically corresponding to the decrease in both Napier, and Hastings. There were 42 permits issued in Daniievirke during 1930, aggregating in value £ 11,554, the corresponding figures for 1929 being 38 permits and £25,842. A noteworthy feature of the big decrease in value in 1930, waß that it was practically all, iu dwellings, which made up £20,052 of the £25,842 total in 1929, but were of a, value of only £6934 in 1930. New business premises •were represented by a value of £3030 in 1929, and £3398 in 1930,

JANUARY *ERMiI&

TOTAL OP 414,365, For the ton months ended January 31st, the Christchurch City Council issued building permits representing work to the value of £486,670, as compared with £711,071 for the corre*. ponding ten months of 1928-80. The permits totalled 748, the number in the preceding equal period being 968. Only £14,365 worth of work was authorised last month, this total being tho lowest for such a period 'for many yours In January, 1939, the total value was £91,022. ; Permits have not yet been issued for tho new Regent street shops and' the Nurses' Home, on which nearly' £90,000 will he expended, so that, if these are included in the February total, some of, the ground lost in January will bo.'regained. The following are detail of th« permits issued last month and in January, 1929:

REBUILDING ANGORA, PROFESSOR'S ASSIGNMENT, Professor Klemens Holzmeiater, one of the leading and most original of Vienna 'architects, has been commissioned by the Turkish Government to build a lar§© part of new Angora in his own distinctive stylo. At "»-. leeCV.T dcl jY ere <* to Vienna be snowed the audience some remarkpble pictures of tho Government Quarter on °-iVi f near the capital. In tho middle of November the new buildings of the War Office, with 400 rooms, and ■w„« % ? T e ? al « taff .™th 230 rooms, were finished. Two thousand workmen are now busy completing the other official buildings. p The future residence of Kemal Fasha, "Gazln Evi," is among their number: this will be dooorated in- Viennese style. The House of Parliament, close by is to crown the official quarff" i^ Io T 'J wiU he a mi, »tary school lor 1000 students and a casino. Barracks for the police and gendarmerie and the Ministries of Work and the Interior are to bo completed in a few f° nt JX 8 ' finally, a military hospital j I P?* 10 is being constructed, and the idea, of a central railway sta-' tion is under consideration.

In promising to submit tho representations of tli© deputation to tho Unemployment ...Relief Council, the Minister said that be understood a move was on foot to reorganise the whole of the accommodation of Goverment Departments. If the headquarters of the Governor were transferred to Admiralty House, the present Government House grounds would be a fine place for building a substantial House of Parliament. A substantial Government office on the site of the temporary Architects' Department Building, and an extension of the Treasury Buildings were also mentioned by the Minister.

The designs and specifications". tor the work or inscribing in the Wall of Memories at the War Memorial Museum the names of all those Auckland, men and women who gave their' Uvss. while on service oversea* in the Great War novo been approved by the Roll of Honour Committee. Tenders will be called for the work (states the ♦'New Zealand Herald" The pediments of the present walls is the ball will not bo altered,.but .over the plaster mural eurfacos will be laid white Sicilian marble slabs, on which the names will be inscribed in letters out into the face and inset with bronze leaff Gold lettering and lead inlay had been considered, but at the last meeting it was decided that the bronze leaf would be more in keeping with the east bronze letters, which will form the commemorative legend over the entrance to the shrine. The niches in the walls on eaoh side of 'the entrance to the shrine will be left, and in each will be placed a marble pedestal bearing a copy of the roll of .honour. - The corresponding niches at the other endj on either side of the entrance to the campaign -< maps, will be filled in, in order to allow more space for names. Mr A. 0. A. Sexton reported to the meeting that the full rollhad not yet been received from Wellington,' but it was there would, be- approximately 7500 names. Every effort wtU be made to have the, work completed by Anzac Day, 1932.

.-Ward. . 1&80.F :\:*i$m$; Central (Inn-ir Area) s . 070 -MfaMi Central (OuterlArea) l,61gS y% 89* St A bans ,.. ... 5,254S#15 78», Sydenlinin ... ; ... Wood ... ... 2,79^X6,005 fepreydon « ... l^mtfiTS Woolston 1 fllfl' j o ow truuibDon .,» ... i,wu >•> JJ,V57i Totals .. . ... £14,3&!f £0i,cJi|

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HEARTH And HOME, Press, Volume LXVII, Issue 20154, 5 February 1931

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HEARTH And HOME Press, Volume LXVII, Issue 20154, 5 February 1931

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