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General News.

A spocial meeting of tho Hawko's Buy County Council yesterday, resolved that a reduction of 10 per cent. b<j made in all wages and salaries payable to employees as from February, lie ptiblio purse will thus bo saved £2300 apnually.—Press Association. Trenching which has been done on tho western bank of the river, between Victoria and Armagh streets, and across the Armagh street bridge, is in connexion with the scheme for the improved lighting of Victoria square. The bases of'some of the lighting standards have been placed in position.

The alteration in the exchange rate between Australia and New Zealand was brought homo in decisive fashion to a Melbourne visitor to Christchurch yesterday. Wishing to cash a cheque for £lo,on his bank in Molbourne, through the account of a local resident, he ascertained that he would receive only &9 Is Bd.

A number of men who arc out of work havo approached Mr E. .W. Ilawfco, M.P., with a request that he mako Representations to the Government in favour of the lifting of tho restrictions on salmon fishing in the Waimakariri river. Mr Hawke said last evening that if this were done it' would assist in relieving unemployment in February and March.

Information lias been received by the Canterbury Automobile Association to the effect that the deviation on the West Coast road below Kelly's creek is in a very soft condition. Tho Otira river ia in high flood* in consequence of which it is neceßsa#y to rail cars to Aicken's, It i# anticipated that about a month will elapse before the road is ready again for traffic.

"Even at Columbia University, tho Mecca of educationists of the New World, one finds in the syllabus such subjects as <The ars of poultry-farming,', 'The eonductorship of orchestras and bands,' and 'Ballroom 'etiquette,' remarked Mr F. Milner, headmaster 4 of Waitaki Boys' High School, at the Teach' era' Summer School yesterday, when Jtf strating the trend of education in America* universities;

Improvements to the buildings and grounds of the; Avonside Girls' High School are still in progress. The old portable structure standing in front of the now wing i* being removed to a i jsit<» at the end of the permanent i classrooms, where it will serve as a pavilion. Portion of the old residence which was tho, original school is beiiy? demolished, arid the part remaining is fed Jig converted into a caretaker's cottage. , x

At a meeting > of tho Taieri River Trust at Duneain, it was stated, in reply to a letter from the Minister for Public Works," regarding the repayment of a loan of £70,000, that, with the returns for primary produce reduced " by half, Taieri farmers could hot pay the heavy drainage rate .assessed and the Trust could not carry on. It was resolved to send a deputation < to the Minister to explain the position. •* Comparing the attitude of Britain towards Germany with that of France* when lecturing to teachers at last night's session of the Summer School, Mr F. Milner remarked that the British »'tommies'' in the army of occupation On the Rhine were universally respected. With the poilus it' was not so. They seemed; to delight in poking fun at the Germans and subjecting them to ridicule.

Reporting at last night's meeting of the' New Zealand Utility Poultry Club tnat negotiations to let, the club s rooms had fallen through, the seor©tarv, Mr S. 1?. Marshall, revealed the faot • that the prospective clients had been a firm connected with the issue of prise certificates. They had been prepared to rent the rooms, but . the Government had, "tabooed" the certificate business,- - and of course the scheme had' fallen through. .

Enrolments at the Canterbury Agricultural College, Lincoln, are well up to the numbers of last year; indeed, there is a possibility of their being exceeded, according to .a report submitted to yesterday's meeting of the College Board of Governors. 1 here are five third-year .degree students, four second-year, and three first-year; J3 seeond-vear diploma students, and W firat-jtear. There are 29 New Zealand students, including four Maoris,. three New Zealand students borri in England* one from Canada, one from .Valparaiso, and one from England.

It was announced in Monday's Press that the reunion of the 13th Company of the 3rd Infantry Battalion of the Canterbury Eegimerit (N.Z.E.F.) would take place on April otli. Wo are now informed that the day will be Saturday, -April 4th. The present type ot rear lamp on guards vans attached to New Zealand express trains is being gradually replaced by one which derives its energy from the lighting, dynamo. The new style is more economical, simple, and efficient than the oil-burning type.

A narrow escape from losing his sight was experienced by a Te Awamutu boy, Gordon Martin, while attending a picnic (states a local corrapDndent of the "Wanganui Herald"). He was boiling wate.r in a 71b treacle tin and had jammed the lid on tightly. When the water boiled the lid was blown ofi and the boy was badly scalded about the face and head.

Glow worms make the tunnel on the track to the Okehu dam from the main road a veritable fairyland (says the "Wanganui Chronicle"). The tunnel is about a third of a mil© in length, and the worms' bright lamps shining in clusters and in pin-points of light are good reward for quietness to anybody who is making the trip to the dam. The track is about a mile in length and follows the Mangahoropito stream

The Russian, like the Oriental, did not. have much sense of time. Professor J. L. Wrigley told his audience at tho Summer School yesterdnv, when speaking of the Five-Year Plan of the Soviet. Thus ho rarely had much use for clocks, but now lie worked systematically in industry he had to bo more precise. This had been well illustrated by a recent caption he had seen: "Ivan works in a factory; he needs a clock." Consequently, a firm had gone to Russia to turn out a million alarm clocks and watches a year.

At a special meeting last evening of tho Ohristehurch Free Ambulance Incorporated, tlie Superintendent (Mr A. R. Higgins) reported that during tho holiday period heavy demands were made on tho ambulance fleet, and in consequence it had been decided to add another ambulance to the present fleet of three. It was announced also that the service would bo extended to Kaikoura in tho north and Mothven in the south.

Some time ago tho Department of Scientific find Industrial ltesearch approached the Hoard •of Governors of Lincoln College with the object of establishing a plant research station near tho colloge. The Board acquired 100 acres and sowing was commenced. Soon nftcrwards, however, tho work was discontinued. At yesterday's meeting of tho Board a latter was received from Mr C. H. Hewlett, a member of the Board, who suggested that the Department should bo ijrsml to continue with tho scheme. Tho meeting decided to carry out his suggestion.

A start was made yesterday with the operations in connexion with tho construction of the new roadway between Gloucester and Armagh streets to be known as Regent street. Tho preliminary work put in hand yesterday was tho demolition of tho building formerly well known as tho Colosseum. A gang of men were employed on tho Gloucester street front of tho building. Tho Colossoum has had an interesting history. It was built originally by Messrs' M. O'Brlon and ,Co., and occupied by them as a boot factory. It has been used as a skating rink and also as a moving picture theatre and, latterly, as a garage.' At one time there was some talk of it being acquired by the City Council for the purpose of a municipal market. " ' '•

Moving on an incline in Victoria road, Devonport, an unattended motor lorry gathered speed and collided with a teelgraph pole at the corner of Victoria road and Clarence street (says the "Auckland Herald"). The impact caused a short circuit of the fire alarm wiring which the pole carried and a call was rogistered at the station. The brigade, however, was saved tho trouble of answering the summons owing to the fact that tho tape machine, which registers the alarm, makes a distinction between a short circuit and a genuine call. Tho defect was later adjusted.

Tho peculiar fascination that radiators of cars haye for / sparrows has aroused the curiosity of many people,, but no obvious reason hitherto seems to have suggested itself. An observant citizon of Palmerston North (says the "Manawatu Times") solved the mystery when he closely watched a perky little sparrow flit from ear to car and pick small flies from the cooling screen in the front of the vehicle. The small apertures provide a splendid trap for the flies, and the sparrows have apparently realised thp value or such a medium for collecting provender without needless exertion.

Owing to the withdrawal of the Govorment subsidy of £75 a year, military bands are finding it difficult to carry on, and it is feared t! at before, long Wellington may find itself without bantl music for State occasions, such as the opening of Parliament, Anzac Day, and funerals. It is reported that the First Battalion Band has already disbanded (says the "Dominion") and that the Artillery Band is finding difficulty m carrying on owing to shortage of finance, gome of the bandsmen, who give their services gratuitously, are losing their employment, and difficulty is being experienced in holding the bands together.

John Johnston, Ltd., merchants, established 1863. Direct importer? of British and American hardware - and machinery. 'Phone 4. P.O. Box L Bangiora. ' —1 Peninsula farmers considering extension of water supply for stock will find our high lift Electric Puttps equal to severest duties. Prices lowest, consistent with quality and sorviee. Your proposition Can be successfully- met (from the wide range of Booth-mac Pumps. 'Phone, Write, or >call, Booth, Macdonald, and Co., Ltd. —O6 When buying implements, it is weli to remember tnat at Tuam street the best is always procurable in the tallowing lines Ploughs. Cultivators, Grubbers, Hay Sweeps, and Btnckera, Land Hollers, Clod Crushers, Strip-, pers—.both front and rear drum type. Horse Rakes, Bamford's Mowers, Harrows of all sorts, including; Grass Land Harrows, tripod, chain tine and Drummond Harrows, Yokes, Whipple trees Plough shares of every brand and type. Tractor lifts for every plough, etc. P. and D. Duncan, Limited, ,196 Tuam street, Christchurch, and at Ashburton. —6

Who brought the taxi fares doyrat Why, the Gold Band Taxis. Then give them your support, as they have created work for a large number of men who would be on tha unemployment lists to-day. They carry all yptir luggage, prams, cycles, etc., no extra charge, and are the only taxis fitted with lug. gage carriers. This allows extra comfort to passengers. Our loweßt fare is only Is, as compared with 3s 6d. Why pay more? 'Phones 84-075, or 35-572. Thank you. —3

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19310114.2.54

Bibliographic details

General News., Press, Volume LXVII, Issue 20135, 14 January 1931

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1,829

General News. Press, Volume LXVII, Issue 20135, 14 January 1931

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