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OBITUARY.

SIR JOHN HOSKING.

[THE PEESS Special Service.]

WELLINGTON, May 30

The death occurred at 9 o'clock this morning at his residence at Highland Park. Wadestown, of Sir John Hosking, K. 8., who retired from the Supreme Court Bench about three years ago. Ho had been in failing health for some months.

Sir John Hosking has been one of the most useful public men in the Dominion for the last three or four years in that his wealth of legal knowledge and wide experience have been brought to bear upon the serious problems that have arisen as an aftermath of the Great War. When the difficulties contingent upon the moratorium declared at the commencement of the war had become acute, it was he who, after his retirement from the Supreme Court Bench, was appointed by the Government under the Mortgages Final Extension Act, 1924, to make enquiries into the adjustments between mortgagees and mortgagors, a work which involved sittings throughout the Dominion extending over several months and led to settlements that have been of tremendous benefit to the country. Again he has acted for some time past as chairman •of the -War Pensions Appeal Board, which is still doing excellent work in enquiring into the intricate matters arising out of claims to pensions, the grounds for which have arisen out of latent disease that has only developed since the ex-soldiers have returned to their civil occupations. Apart from the valuable service which he rendered while a member of the Bench, where he was recognised as one of the soundest and most able of our judges, Sir John also acted with Mr A. Mcintosh in 1913 as a Royal Commissioner to enquire into the working of the Public Trust Office. Owing to his devotion to his calling, Sir John took comparatively little part in public affairs, although several movements in Dunedin owe much to his ability. He was entrusted with tho extremely difficult task of devising and framing the novel and complicated legislation connected with the affairs of the Bonk of New Zealand, and the fulfilment of the task reflected on him. the greatest credit. Born at Penzance. Cornwall, in 1854, Sir John Hosking came to New Zealand with his parents as a child and received his education in Auckland, where the family settled.. At the age of sixteen he was articled to the ■ late Mr Samuel Jackson, of Jackson and Russell, one of the early law firms of Auckland, and he. was admitted _ to practice as a barrister and solicitor by Mr Justice Gillies in 1875. Shortly afterwards he removed to Dunedin, where in 1877. he became a member of the. firm of Kenyon and Hosking, which was caried on until 1898. the next ten years he practised alone, after which he took in Mr John Cook as partner. In 1907 he was appointed King's Counsel and in 1914 came his elevation to the Supreme Court Bench, where he sat until ill-health compelled him to consider his resignation. In 1924 no took a long holiday and visited England. On his return he announced his impending retirement, but was prevailed' upon to continue occupying his seat ; on the Supreme Court. Bench in order to deal with applications arising put of the Mortgages Final Extension Act. He retired, early in* 1925, and his .long record of service on the Bench was*recognised by the.King in conferring on him the honour of Knight: Bachelor in.the' birthday list of" that year. . On the occasion of his retirement from the Bench, a striking tribute was paid him by the present Chief Justice, then Mr 0. P. Skerrett, K.C., voicing the sentiments of the legal profession of New Zealand. "Your Honour will step down from the judgment seat after fifty years of connexion with the Bar and ( ten years of service on the Bench, with your robes of office unsullied, amidst the regrets of the profession, and witl the respectful esteem and affection of all those who have practiswl lefore •you.-High as has been, the standard of the •- Justice Bench, your Honour need not fear to he measured >y th-jt standard in the minds of your contemporaries, or, I belijevo, in. the minds of posterity, who are the ultimate, judges." Sir John Hoßking and Lady Hosking took a prominent part in. the . affairs of the. Royal New Zealand Society for. the Health of Women and Children (the Plunket Society) from the forma-' tion in 1907, Lady Hosking being the first president of the organisation iii Dunedin. Lady Hosking is now president of the Wellington branch: In addition to giving assistance in an advisory capacity in the framing of rules and in other ways. Sir John was a . regular attendant with Lady Hosking at the annual meetings of the Society. The late Sir John Hosking is survived by his widow, Lady Hosking (nee Miss Reader), and leaves a family of one daughter (Mrs Dundas Allan, of Sydney, who is at present in New Zealand), and two sons (Mr John Hosking, who is at * University in Hoiland, and Mr Christopher Hosking, who is farming in Canterbury). There arp no erandchildren. "' The funeral, which will take place at Karori Cemetery to-morrow mornr ing, will be preceded by a short service at St. Luke's Church, Wadestown.

THE DUKE OF NEWCASTLE.

(immSD FEESB 4880CUTI0K—BJ BLBCTBIO TOLEdBMk—COPTBIOHT.)

(Received May 31st, 12.55 a.m.)

LONDON, May 30.

• The death has occurred of the Duke of Newcast 1 "-:—Australian Press Association, .United Service. [Henry Pelham Douglas PelharaClinton, the seventh Duke of Newcastle, was a son of the sixth Dn 1 - and was born in 1864. He was educated at Eton and was for several years a member of the London School Board. His estate comprises 35,600 acres at Clumber Park, Worksop, and Forest Farm, Windsor Forest., His heir is Lord H. F. Pelham-Clintbn Hope.]

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Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Press, Volume LXIV, Issue 19324, 31 May 1928

Word Count
968

OBITUARY. Press, Volume LXIV, Issue 19324, 31 May 1928

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