Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

NURSES' CHAPEL.

FOUNDATION STONE LAID. MEMORIAL TO MARQUETTE VICTIMS. It was an impressive ceremony that the Duke attended at the hospital yesterday morning, when he laid the foundation stone of the Nurses' Memorial Chapel. The main corridor, several hundred yards in length, was lined with nurses and other hospital assistants, all in white uniform. Down the passage, the Duke walked, smiling at the erect girls along the way. Before entering the hospital, his Royal Highness waa met by the chairman of the Board (Mr C. E. Otley), the Medical Superintendent (Dr. Fox), the Lady Superintendent (Miss Muir), and the members of the Board. Mr Otley said:— "Your Royal Highness,—On behalf of the North Canterbury Hospital Board and the residents of the hospital district, I desire to extend to you the warmest of welcomes to the Christchurch Hospital, which was founded by the Canterbury Pilgrims, who made the establishment of a hospital one of i the first duties.

"We regret greatly the absence of her Royal Highness, the Duchess of York, whose graciousness has won the love and esteem of all who have been fortunate enough to meet her, and pray that she may soOn be restored to good health.

"That you have generously undertaken to perform the ceremony of laying the foundation stone of the chapel which is being erected as a memorial to those brave New Zealand nurses who_ lost, their lives whilst on Active service, is fin act of grace which is much appreciated by all. "We sincerely trust that the stay of your Royal Highness in our midst may in the future be amongst yoTir happiest memories/' The Stone Laid.

The official party took tip their position on a dais, the foundation stone being directly in front of the platform and covered with a flag. Proceedings were opened with the singing of the hymn "From Every Stormy Wind That Blows" by the choir.

Dr. Fox made the following speech

In Peace and War. "Your Royal Highness:—

"May it please your Royal Highness to accept our thanks for the honour you have conferred on its in favOiiring us with your presence for the purpose of laying the foundation stone of this, the Nurses' Memorial Chapel, to be erected to commemorate the Chrisfcchurch Hospital nurses who died during the Great War and the epidemic of 1918.

"The conception of such a chapol originated in the minds of Miss Maude and Miss Thurston both ex-matrons of the Christchurch their idea was crystallised and brought into being by the efforts of the present lady superintendent of nurses, Miss Muir, lii conjunction with the present committee, aided by the generosity of the public,

"We have just reason to feel proud of the New Zealand nurses who proved their courage and devotion to duty dating the long years of the Great War, and gave untiring service to the sick and wounded. In peaoe as well as on active service, our nurses have laid down their live* and it is to perpetuate the memory of the bravo arid .faithful women thtlt this chaftel is to be dedicated. •."Chit October 28rd. 1915,' the transport Marquette, conveying the staff of the First New Zealand Stationary HoSr>ital. was torpedoed in the Gulf of Salonika. Among those who Tost thefr lives were three nurses belonging to the Christchttrch Hospital.

i Gave Up Their Lives. "During the influenza epidemic of 1918, two nurses gave up their life's' to duty. We feel that no more fitting memorial of these, our comrades, could be found than a Hospital Chapel, which will recall to all Who serve in this hospital the memory of those good add faithful servants who made the supreme sacrifice for crthers:— Nurse Nora Hildyard. Nurse Lorna Rattray. Nurse Margaret-Rogers. Laid down their lives in the Great War. . Nurse Grace Campbell fleSwick. ' Nurse Hilda Hooker gave up their lives to duty during the epidemic, all thereby perpetuating the tradition of the noble calling.'' "Last Post" was sotinded before Miis Muir removed the flag from the stone, and his Royal Highness declared it Well arid truly laid. i Cheering Nurses. The Duke inspected the children's ward, and Walked through the hospital grounds before returning to his car. He had a ready smile for all the patients, who cheered him, but it was when he found himself surrounded by; nurses that his Royal Highness smiled the most.

"Hurrah," and "Smile Duke," they cried, aSshe took his place in the car, arid cameras clicked on all isides as the procession moved out of the gates.

AN AVENUE OF YOUTH. SCENES IN PARK TERRACE. Girls and boys, most of them pupils at private schools, lined both sides of Park terrace to pay their tribute of loyalty to his Royal Highness as l> n passed along that route from the Ad* dington Trotting Grounds to the fete in. the Botanic Gardens, in the afternoon.

Over four thousand pupils from Christ's College, St. Andrew's College, St. Bede's College,. Chmtohurth Technical College, St. Margaret's College, Cathedral Grammar Hangi Uuru dehooJ. fci. Aiary'a duhool, the Sacred Heart College, and other smaller private, schools, all balding their coloured banners aloft, waited Patiently for the arrival of the Duke. Soon after three o'clock, a warning ran down the lines, stretching from Bealey ayentfe to Armagh street; ''He's coming!" Four thousand heads turned eagerly in the direction of the nvehiie, while the citizens craned their necks, awaiting the Duke's coming with upttifn<id faces. The feeling of suppressed excitement was intensified when a low murmur suddenly rose from the spectators near to the top end of Park terrace. Down the lines it ran, and was taken up by the waiting crowds, swelling into ft roar of cheering arid enthusiastic shouting from ten thousand throat*

Thett the tine of cars swung into the avenue of youth. There tvss * vigorous outburst of cheering, the shrill piping voices of laughing trirls ringing strangely amid the deep l throated cheeriflj?' of bors. ft was the tribute of Christehurch's youth to his Royal Highness the Duk" of York. With uncovered head, and seated in the rear of a touring car. he acknowledged it with pleasant nods.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19270316.2.81

Bibliographic details

NURSES' CHAPEL., Press, Volume LXIII, Issue 18951, 16 March 1927

Word Count
1,020

NURSES' CHAPEL. Press, Volume LXIII, Issue 18951, 16 March 1927

Working