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DEATH OF SIR W. FRASER.

A GREAT record of PUBLIC SERVICE. (iMAur. *o "m nw.") WELLINGTON, July. 16. After an illnoss lasting only a few rt9 y« ( the Hon. Sir William Fraser, j£L.O., this morning at the age d/ S3 .years. About three weeks ago, while working in his office, Sir William became j]j and consulted his doctor, who adjjied Jiira to go into a private hospital, *bere ho would have tho benefit of 6# at nursing and attention. He appeared to improve considerably in iealtb, and was well enough to leave hospital, but after a brief abiMta had to return there. For about j wetk or moro it has been apparent 0 bis friends that ho had little chance of eompleto recovery. Sir William Fraser when he died was fl member of tho Executive, and up till jyj last illness he took part in the gorernment of the country, so that prsetically he died in harness. gjr William Fraser had been for .jasr years au outstanding figure in tie Beforin Party, and during later ypW in tho Government. Though an tUtfly man when he took office, he iittaiibed all who came in contact *i{h hi®; b 0 " 1 in regard to his mental j]srine» and his tireless physical fittgy- As Minister of Public Works b' Dade tr.unv a rough trip through back country, and held his own (hese journeyings with men many 4g» his junior. Ho was noted for and his straight dealings jrith those with whoin he had to transit public business. Ho had especially ) sound knowledge of the country's {usee.

It was during Sir William's torm as yipiffttr of Public Works that the Xilu Coleridge hydro-clectric schome ill completed and brought into operate and the plans perfected for the ptiter developments proposed by Mr fury, including Jl.uigahuo, Waikareaoina, and the Waikato scheme.

As Minister of Mines ho also did good for mining was a subject ij which ho had taken keen interest ig bit life, gjr William Fraser was married in ' JJTI to a daughter of tho late Mr, Alfred Cheatham Strode, Resident Jfagistrtte, Dunediu. His wife died B»ny years ago. He ia survived by a % lighter, Miss Fraser, of Wellington, .'irjioisapianiste p£ more than ordinary ijiility. She studied in Germany. Like Ijs daughter, Sir William waa koenly ilterested in music, and waa a constant ' attendant at all the best performances given in Wellington for many yoars. The funeral takes place on WednesUy morning.

fRIBUTES IN THE HOUSE. PRIME MINISTER'S EULOGY. (aricui. to "ran -pmbi.") WELLINGTON, July 16. In the Jlouffi of Representatives this afternoon the Prime Minister moved , tye osuaj motiou in regard to . the 4j»tb of a member of Parliament. In <ssg 60 he said the late Sir William Jfcaier was bom in Indja in 1840, and opt tho sos of Captain Hugh Fraser, £& Madras Light Cavalry. He wan rfMßted at Elizabeth College (Guerilla), Victoria College (Jersey), and the lyeae de Brieuj, Brittany. He arrival in Wellington in Soptember, 1858, ■ proceeded to Dunodin, where ho Mewed pastoral pursuits as a runfctMar ia the Dunstan district from 1802 . U 1603., He wae ejected in 1866 as tennber of the Provincial Council of OUgo for tho Dijpjtjin , district. In 4o appointed member of tho Viwent County Council, and in MM he was elected chairman, occupying tho poet eeutisuously until 1893. Hs wi elected member of the Houso of wjwentatives in 1893 for tho WakaBpu .electorate, and sat continuously to tiat electorate until 1919, when , He was appointed to the «p«l»tive Council in J919. When •fiWttWt Government assumed office hf Was appointed Minister of Works and Mjijep, holding thos3 PorßOUos until tho date of his retirewns a member of the Bank Z!oalaud Assets Realisation rWj w»s ji director of seyoral *fttoown financial institutions. ' Ho JSN'M leader of the Legislative jjjfflcil during the absence of Sir "tttu Bell at the Geneva Conference, was Minister-in-Charge of the - on tho occasion of the ■«WOf H.B.H, the Prince of Wales to M* Zealand, Ho was knighted in WM appointed Knight Comthe Victorian Order in 1920. •.»«» 83 years of age at the time of £ death. « SB? the death this morning of Sir Pw« Fraser," added Mr Massey, ,ajpwe came to an end one of the , 5M nseful careers in tho history of WjWJntry. I am speaking as one him and knew him well and 'gpjttely. We took the oath of 'Ha* 6 as ot ' this House .Mfwr in 1894, and were members of -kK 8016 P ar t 7 f°r many years, work--WPte, and fipally sitting on_ the W bench- He was one of niy Minis* WW: eolleaguas practically from 1912 * y 9 date of his death. I have alnw indicated that ho was elected J** Provincial Council of Otago very »n his career. At that time h<-' ;rV*lwayg looked on as one who wqi public man. After he took in the House of Representawas not long in making his that timo tho country was most serious depression. 3 "Wiks, financial institutions, busiand men on the land were {fflffjog very serious losses, so that ne eessary to call a halt in '"tare. Ia that year the Bank ftp®* Zealand had to ask assistance :tS,the State, and Mr Fraser (as ho known) rendered very valu*. in the financial legislation the crisis, I have a very .Collection of the events that that time. The opinion C]v* T4 Wf wa» often aalced, and nearaeeepted on financiiil matters wpeaben, pot only of his own party, wTO both, fides of the House. Ho jM.*PPoiited a member of the Bank Zealand Assets Realisation 'SSv't extraordinarily useful s2s.t®' assisting in winding up the [■Hy *ad avoiding any loss to the was an active and euerof Public Worlcs for » kSy y«ars, and was favourably only in Otago, but in every <JS| Zealand. He was 1 and enthusiastic citizen of the Sp'' the country. During the 18, years of the war he never Ifttr tl)e opinion that our first gMiWa* to defeat the enemy, and the integrity of the Empire*

He was a gentleman in every sense of the word —trusted and respected. He has gone to his rest full of years and honours, and Has left behind a memory and reputation which the public men of to-day and the futuro might well emulate."

Other Speakers. The Leader of the Opposition (Mr T. M. Wilford) added his tribute to that of the Prime Minister. He agreed with all that Mr Massey had said in regard to Sir Wm, Eraser's knowledge of finance. "Sir William Fraser was very fortunate," said Mr Wilford, "in boing a man that had a first-class education, which undoubtedly contributed largely; to the high place he attained in the public, life of the country. Hi* could rightly be said to have devoted the whole of his life to the public service. I was associated with him for two years during the war, and I know from what took place during those years that the tribute paid _ by the Prime Minister was well merited. He was a gentleman whose thoughts of Empire were always on a high plane as rogards duty and service, and now that he has laid down the burden, those who have not realised his work in the past will feol that it falls to the lot of few public men to carry on so thoroughly and ' effectively the obligation of public duty as fully as Sir William Fraser."

Mr H. E. Holland (Leader of the Labour Party) joined with the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition- in their expressions of regret. It had not been his privilege to have the same close association with him as had those two lion, members, and he had not come into close touch with him in departmental matters as had other members of the House, but they all recognised the long service he had given both to the Parliament and the party \yith which he had been associated. In cpnnexion with his death, he wished to extend the sympathy of his party to the Government and to the party to which the lion, gentleman belonged, and their condolences to the relatives he had left behind.

Mr J. Horn, as member for the Wakatipu district, expressed his plea£uro in having listened to the tributes that came from those that had just spoken. Ho had known the late Sir "William Fraser for 45 years, and had been in almost daily contact with liim throughout. " He assured hon. members that he was beloved in the district that lie had so long represented in Parliament. He (Mr Horn) was on the opposite side in politics, and had contested one election with Sir William Fraser, but it had been a most pleasant contest. He had left many frionds who would never forget him. The Hon. G. J. Anderson said he had known Sir William Fraser when he (Mr Anderson) waa a boy on the goldfields in the early seventies, and so was aware of the good work he had done in a mining community- Thero was no one in New' Zealand who had such an extensive knowledge of the mining laws of the country as he had. In his young days he was a brave man, and Lis bravery was conspicuously shown on one occasion, when lie rescued a child from drowning in the flooded Molvneux river. That action was remembered many years afterwards, and he (Mr Anderson) recollected a meeting that was rather hostile to Mr Fraser, at which a man, who was the child he had saved, took charge and insisted that, on account of his bravery, the wholo meeting should vote for him. He was loved by his constituents in Central Otago, both as a man and as an employer. At one meeting which he (Mr Anderson) had reported in the election 'contest of 1905, a white-headed old ehearer camo up from, the audience to the platform and shook hands with the candidate, remarking at the same time that he was the best employer ho had ever had, and one of the finest men he had ever met. Tho people of Otago and Southland would remember him for piany years, not only as a politician, but also fts a man. Mr G. Witty (Riccarton) said it was twenty' years since hp had met th ; late Sir '\yilliam Fraser in Parliament, pnd he he.d been struck then with his atfength and vigour, with his practical knowledge, and with his willingness to do »U ho could for hip country. Ho was. a map who, if he ever made a piigtaice, always willing to rectify it, and his. word was his bpnd. He had lived a life of usefulness, and had done hip heat for the country of his adoption. Ho had left a record that anyone might be proud of, The work th<it he had dope would last for many generations, T, g. Sidey HDuneqlin South) pdded his tribute. The Jato Sir Wiljiftin "Fraser, he sjiid, was a, man peculiarly gifted, in that he was able to approach any question'in a, thoroughly judicial frame of mind and, more than (iny man in' the House, he was able to jay aside •'' all private interests, prejudices, and partial affections." The Minister ■of Defence (the Hon. Sir E. Heaton Rhodes) said that, as pne who had also enjoyed the friendship of the late Sir William Frasar, he desired to add his tribute. He had first met him in 18D4, just prior to the general election, and though there wore others present wfyo also achieved distinction, there was none present who had epnje right through as members .of the House, except the Prime Minister, who was present on that occasion. The following evening he(Sir Heaton) had spent in the.company pf the late Sir William Fraser, and as they ppcei the d,eok of the steamer (,n their way to Lyttelton, he gave the speaker advice which he had found post helpful* He Avas very interesting to listen to in regard to his experiences of the earlier days, but was air wayi* cheerful in recounting his share pf the hardships. He had died in harness. Sir George Hunter said that he . had enjoyed the friendship of the late Sir William Frasor for 85 years, and had hail many opportunities of esteeming his sterling character. He had held the Wakatipu seat for 25 years, a Unique position among the members of Parliament, rendered all the more so by tho fact that he resided far putside the district'represented. He ventured tho opinion that this record ot the trust and confidence shown in him would help to console those who mourned their loss. On the motion of the Prime Minister, the House adjourned until 7.30 p.m.

SIR WILLIAM FRASER AND OTIRA TUNNEL. Mr H. J. Marriner, chairman of the Railway Committee of the Canterbury Chamber of Commerce, made the following roference, last night, to the passing of Sir William Eraser:"Tho news of the death of Sir William Fraser will be received with great rogret. At all times he was approachable, and he listened always very attentively to both sides of a question. Once having made up his mind as to the right course, he .went straight ahead, regardless o' all opposition. The people of Canterbury particularly are indebted to the late Sir William in his capacity of Minister of Public Works. Turing tho war, when money was tight, a crisis arose with regard to the carrying on of the work in connexion with the Otira tunnel. Strong pressure was brought to bear on all the Ministers in favour of closing down tho work or at least cutting down the amount of money required. The argument# in favour of this course were logical, but at a critical moment the fate Sir William Fraser, haying care-

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fully considered every detail, decided ■that the wisest and most economical course was to push the work througn to its completion, and as everybody now knqws ins efforts m this connexion successful, yince he left otiice his successors haive carried on this work, and it ib irony qt fate that Sir William should bo taken when the linking up of the East, and West Coasts is an accomplished fact, and on August 4th, tho date fixed for the official opening of the Otira tunnel, his kindly presence will be much missed." TRAMWAY BOARD'S TRIBUTE. The Christehureh Tramway Board passed the following motion of appreciation of the !ate Sir Win. Fraser, and condolence with his relatives:—"That this Board learns with much regret of the death' of the Hon. Sir "William Eraser, who for (seven years was Minister of Public Works, which Department includes the supervision of municipal tramway undertakings. It recordb its high appreciation of the services which the late >linistei has rendered the country, and conveys to his relatives its sincere sympathy in the bereavement which they have sustained."

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Bibliographic details

DEATH OF SIR W. FRASER., Press, Volume LIX, Issue 17817, 17 July 1923

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DEATH OF SIR W. FRASER. Press, Volume LIX, Issue 17817, 17 July 1923

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