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ORCHARDS AT LOBURN.

("From Our Loburn Correspondent. 1 )

The commercial orchards at Loburn which exfenrlecl hore and there a!on<* a strip of about four miles, and at a distance of from four to eight miles from Hangiora, J end a charm to the lanscape, first in the spring-time when the trees issue forth their gorgeous array of fragrant, blossom, followed bv the advent of rich green foliage and of fruit developing and ripening, and finally by the dainty autumn-tinted leaves proclaiming the quiescent period. These orchards are situated, above sealevel, at a height varying somewhere from 200 to 350 feet, which is considered to be the most desirable altitude for fruit culture, and cover the extensive area of 370 or 3SO acres. When it is calculated, allowing IS feet space between each tree, that 10-i or 135 trees per acre can be accommodated it can be realised that the fruit-producing capacity of those orchards containing the most excellent varieties, in a few years' time will be of considerable magnitude and importance.

Almost without exception the or- | chards are being well cared for and ] kept scrupulously tidy. Twitch is the chief weed enemy, yet the process of eradication has transformed the surface into a fine moisture-conserving tilth, which certaintly is pleasing, and gives nothings but evidence of being beneficial to the growth and development of the trees. Once the Makerikeri is crossed the soil varies from heavy with a clay subsoil on the left-hand side, to a deep rich silt, and in piaces, as is common to all river-flats in Canterbury, to a sandy loam with shingle beds, and water is readily accessible generally. In this loamy soil under the natural shelter of an extending terrace peaches and nectarines do remarkably well, and for colour, size, and flavour their equal, in any land, would be hard to find; while over the whole orchard area -are apples and pears (the latter arc just commencing to yield) of excellent quality. Amongst the orchardists are a good many returned soldiers, who are facing the pioneering work in the young orchards with a commendable spirit. Work is performed more or less on a community system, the one, during any particularly busy period, lending a helping hand to the other. Warm gratitude is expressed for the valuable work of the Government in fostering the industry by experimenting scientifically, and invariably discovering satisfactory means and methods of effectively controlling and combating troublesome insect and fungoid parasites peculiar to orchards, and also for publishing and distributing literature on the results of research work bearing on the industry in distant parts. The following is a summary of the orchards taken in rotation when approaching Loburn from Rangiora:— Messrs Ivory, Ltd., 32 acres of young trees, planted 3 years, assorted commercial varieties ot apples. Lombardy poplars used for shelter. Air N. Goldsbury, 10 acres young trees, commercial varieties of apples. Mr R. E. Greenwood, 6 acres, containing 200 Sturmere, 200 Delicious, 100 Jonathans, and 100 Cox's Orango. Not yet reached bearing stage. Sheltered by pinas insignus (or radiata) and Lombardy poplars. Mr D. Ellwood, 6 acres in the valley of the Makerikeri and sheltered., by a terrace on the eastern side. These l are also young trees and consist of iS.nrmers, Delicious, Jonathans, Cox's Orange and a small percentage of 6tono fruit. Mr J. W. Macleod, 18 acres in which are planted 400 Sturmers, 400 Jonathans, 400 Scarlet Nonpareil, 400 Cos's Orange, 200 Delicious, 100 Rokewood, peaches, and an assortment of commercial varieties of pears. This orchard is situated on river flat soil, and is in bearing. So far Nonpareil has done very well, and followed closely by Sturmers and Jonathans. Shelter, pinus insignifl and Lombardv poplars. Mr W, C. Walls, 100 acres, containing 1100 fruit trees, which consist of Jonathans, Worcester Pearmain, Sturmers, Munroe's Favourite, and Cox's Orange. ( This orchard is carrying a good crop of Sturmers. Soil, river flat formation. Shelter belts, pines and pop. lars.

•Mr A. Kerr, 11 Rcres, trees planted 18 feet apart. This orchard is particularly well sheltered, naturally by a terrace and artificially by tall pines and medium-sized poplars. The soil is good river flat silt, and cultivation is carefully and methodically carried out. The varieties of fruit grown arc peaches —Mayflower, Brigg's lied Mav, and Wiggin's, the first mentioned of these being on the market this season on December 15th; nectarines, wlvch are bearing well; and apples, Stunners, Jonathans, Delicious and Cox's Orange, all in healthy bearing. Mr 0. E. Cook, 5 acres, situated on a sunny hillside slope and well sheltered by the homestead belts, of forest tree;? from northerly winds. The Inain varieties are Delicious and Sturmers, numbering close on 700 trees exclusive of a sprinkling of assorted household varieties of fruit. " '

Mr 11. E. James, 9 acres in bearing, and containing 1200 trees of the following varieties:—6oo Sturmers, 380 Jonathan Sj 150 "Worcester Pearmain. 40 Delicious, and a few other assorted varieties of apples; 100 peaches, consisting of Brigg's Bed May, "Wiggins and Royal George; nectarines and Japanese plums complete the orchard, which is carefully cultivated. The soil is river flat, and shelter belts are Lombardy poplars. Mr J. Ox ley's orchard contains 1000 trees in bearing. The following varieties are represented: Cox's Orange. Sturmers, Jonathans, and Delicious as well as peaches and nectarines. This orchard was planted in 1914. and shows very fine development. The horse cultivator is kopt constantly on the move and the surface soil is as fine as an onion bed, ;uid of a silty texture. Lombardy poplar shelter belts. Mr J. lirown, 10 acres, containing 1200 apples of the following varieties: 500 Sturmers, 300 Delicious, 200 Newtown Pippin, and 200 Cox's Orange. This is one of the youngest orchards in the district, and is making fine headway. Pinus insignis planted on the north and western sides.

Mr W. Brown, 3 acres, containing 200 Stunners, 100 Delicious, and 100 Cos's Orange. Mr D'Acre, on orchard consisting of commercial varieties. Mr E. W. Gimblett, 17 acres in bearing and containing 2500 trees, consisting of 600 Delicious, 350 Worcester Pearmain, 2SO Jonathans, 240 Cox's Orange, 200 Democrat, 150 Scarlet Nonpariel, 100 Stunners; 200 peaches and nectarines; and pears of the following varieties: William's Bon Chretian, Keiffers Hybrid, Dovenne de Cornice, P. Barry, Winter Cole, and Winter Nelis. I 1 !us orchard is in a fin© state of cultivation, and is sheltered by Lombardv poplars.

Mr J. H. Parker. 15 acres in two separate blocks, which contain 350 Jonathans. 300 Sturmers. 300 Cox's Orange, 250 Delicious, 200 Worcester Pearmain, 100 Scarlet Nonpariel, 100 Monro's Favourite, 50 Democrats, and 150 peaches and nectarines. Mr H. R. Kempthorne,. 14 acres in two seoarate blocks, containing approximately 400 Cox's Oranpe, 250 Delicious. 200 Sturmers. 200 Jonathans, TOO Democrats. 100 Scarlet Nonpareil, ]OO Worcester Pearmain: 400 pears, consisting of William's Bon Chretinn. Winter Cole, Winter Nelis. Keiffers' Hybrid. and P. Barry: and an assortment of neaches and nectarines. Mr J. W. Home, 58 acres in three separate blocks, two of which are fruit

fcoarim; and giving pood returns. The mai'i coinnieirial varieties are grown, includui"' Sti'.rniprs, Jonathans, Cox s o'ai,a> ~ Relit ions, Scarlet Nonpareil. Lord' Wolselev. and oJO assorted early aiui !;'to variolic <>t" ) -m lus. _ . Mr H. J. Saxton, 8 acres containing 4lK> :?t-uri«'- > >"s. 41>5 Cox's Orange. 4Oil Pioneer. 100 Grnvenstcin, Cleopatra, and ]>eltluer. This orchard is beaimsi well "Messrs Tl'.nmas and* RojncMs, its'* res consisting: of Jonathans. Cox's Orange, Sturmers. and I litt s Soodlinu;. Mr F. W. Pevnolds. 10 acres containing Stunner*. Delicious. Jonathans, and Cox's Oranpe. Mr A. M. Perry. 9 acres planted as follows: "00 Cox's Oranye. 300 Delicious. 150 Jonathans, and 100 Sturnv-.-;. r.ro crorning heavily. _ T iiis ore-hard is well and is in a tho r onih state of cultivation. Mr ft. Webb. 11; .-teres, a model of perfection in every detail. It contains 400 Stunners, 3~0 Jonathans, iio Pioneer, 50 Cox's Orange, and ="■" Lord Wolselev, as well as peaches and nectarines ' The trees arc hearing prolifically, and are protected bv belts ot" Lombard;." poplars. Mr Webb is a firm believer in the necessity for bees for pollination purposes in an orchard.

Messrs J. Middlebrook and Son, 29' acres, containing 4000 trees, including Jonathans, Stunners, Eokewoods, Delicious, Lord Wolselev, and Glengyle Ped. Carefully cultivated. Mr C. Haseli, 5 acres, containing Sturmers, Jonathans, Cox's Orange, and Lord Wolseley. Well cultivated and promising. Mr F. Hill, 10 acres, planted in 1914. and coming nicely into bearing. The apples consist of 400 Cox's Orange, 400 Newtown Pippin, 300 Jonathans, 200 Stunners, 150 Adam's Pearmain. 120 Pioneer, and 50 Delicious; peaches, nectarines, and a few apricots. This orchard is in a fine state of cultivation, and of much promise. It is situated on a sunny slope, and on a strong soil with a clay subsoil. Mr D. Hill, 8 acres, containing 200 Sturmers, 200 Jonathans, 150 Cox's Orange, 100 Democrats, 100 Adam's Pearmain, 50 Worcester Pearmain; 250 peaches, 100 pears, and 50 nectarines, all coming nicely into bearing. This orchard contains some fine river flat, and the fruit is of special promise. A natural terrace affords ideal shelter. Mr C. W a^son ' s orchard is in a fine state of cultivation, and is coming into 'bearing. The varieties are as follows: —200 Sturmers, 200 Delicious, 200 Munro's Favourite, 200 Worcester Pearmain, 150 Jonathans, and 125 Statesman. Mr G. Hoskins.—The varieties represented are Stunners, Jonathans, Cox's Orange, and Glengyle Red, numbering in all approximately 800 trees, and coming into bearing.

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Bibliographic details

ORCHARDS AT LOBURN., Press, Volume LIX, Issue 17667, 20 January 1923

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1,581

ORCHARDS AT LOBURN. Press, Volume LIX, Issue 17667, 20 January 1923

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