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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

ISSUE OF WRITS. COSE ON THURSDAY. „ 0 f Electors have received Jtf*f% o writs for the general ***2 be on Thursday, tho & aid Ki« be returnable on important matter J* "Tpf the announcement of the «*slfeue of the writs is that the *ZfZ]i6 in a" electorates will close *1 .Bd finally at 6 p.m. on the the verits are issued, next *£t the 16th inst. Persons who ***!t, necessary salifications and who bavo uot * ■. & application for en<*/or on whose behalf no claim has been sent in to the $27 electors for the electoral £7jn which they reside, have, |L only three days in which to lutbeir applications for enrolPf,Jon Thursday their applicaIrJrt be in the hands of the regisPjjjctors before 6 p.m. No time UtalMt by those desirous of reErtbeir votes at the approaching BB Section to ascertain if their ■L 0 n the roll and, if not, to HKjjjation for enrolment. HKtjoiu of candidates for ParHK£>* *t noon ou on d a J> t ue ■Educed some weeks ago, polling BBiTon December 7th. for enrolment are still Hyred in fairly largo numbers Haft of the city electorates. In Hptf one city electorate close on hare been received since the ■ffifelfr. I Supplementary Roll.

K]IOT BE A CANDIDATE. Hr fO WBLUNGTON NOETH Norember 18. to-day and asked a result of one adHm§>) the daily Press a little ImMAmto previously for the North to come it was left for sjgna. HH|§|our kindness on behalt

ernment in repealing the second ballot and giving a promise to substitute something else—a promise that never would be carried out. The Reform Party stood tor no reform. The Labour Party stood lor proportional representation. The Liberal-Labour Party stood for proportional representation, and if they could not get that, they hoped to get necessary electoral reform bv proportional voting. The Liberals" had to fight the Reform Party but there was no policy to fight. He referred to the policy put out by Mr Massey in 1911, but claimed that the promises then made had not been carried out- He referred to the plank of the 1911 nlatform, which stated that the Reform' Party aimed at reTorm of the financial system with the view of keeping borrowing within reasonable bounds and preventing wasteful expenditure. Mr AYilford said Mr Massey hud complained, about secrecy regarding the cost of the £5.000.000 loan. "Wbv tbis socrecv?'' he had asked. "Why this suspicion?" Now, Mr Massey announced last week that he was offered first JKOO.OOO and then £1,000,000 on a short dated loan at a rate that was confidential. We had to pay the rate and we had every right to know what it was, yet Mr Massey said, "why this secrecy? it is bound to cause suspicion." (Laughter.) The objective of the Reform Party and the Labour Party was to get rid of the Liberal Party. "We say absolutely," said Mr l''mord, "that it would be a bad thing for the country if the Liberal Party was ever pushed out of existence. It was the party which made the country in the past/' said Mr Wilford, "and can make it in tho future. We say that the Reform and Labour Parties have grasped hands and compacted to get us out if possible. 1 ' A tvbice: That is a lie. "I will prove/' said Mr Wilford, "that the Reform raft is waterlogged and hardly fit after the elections to carry away the castaways who have to get away." The leader of the Liberal Party referred to the report of the Taxation Committee and said that unless company taxation was reduced to ss, as suggested by the Commission, or some amount fixed by financial advisers, there was trouble coming. He again referred to the 1911 policy, in which it was promised that there) would be no extravagance in expenditure, and an end put to waste, and, said that as yet there was no real attempt to reduce expenditure and stop waste. When he left tho National Cabinet, with his old

chief on August 2nd, 1919, there was a surplus of £15,000,000 in the Treasury. All of this had not gone, as some of it was in soldiers' land. (Laughter.) The bright, brilliant idea of the Prime Minister to get back the 4J per cent, free of income-tax debentures was not going to have the desired effect. The speaker said he had heard it said that the taking of money for these debentures was an immoral transaction, but in his opinion it was nothing of the kind,'for it was dona to make people with money place it at the disposal of the Government. Any man trho had £SOOO worth of these debentures and nothing else would pay no income-tax, so that if he exchanged them for 5J stock the country would merely pay him a little more and, he would still pay no income-tax. He did not expect, nowever, that any company owning £IOO,OOO worth of 4£ debentures would hand them in unless they themselves were to be handed out something n 'se. As showing that expenditure was not being •reduced, as promised in 1911, said Mr Wilford, the Primo Minißtei this year budgettod for very little below that or last year, and there was not the revenue' to meet it. In 1913, the year after Mr Massey took office the expenditure for the > year was £11,825,864. In the 1914 finanoial year it had jumped to £12,379,803. By 1918, the last year of the war, it was £18,673,599. In 1919, the last year of the' National Cabinet, the total was £23.781,524, and as a Minister in the National Cabinet he 'had to take his snare of the responsibility from the time he joined in 1917 to 1919, when he left it. The expenditure for 1920 jumped to £23,068,000. Probably, said Mr Wilfoifd, this was L election year, and the money was needed to buy votes. In 1921, with all the talk, of thrift and economy, tjhe expenditure was £28,466,000/ and this- jeep it was stUl up to £27,»28,000, with an estimated revenue, of £26,250,000, and' this was election year. 'A great many trusts and combines, .miscalled associations, were beginning to take their toll of this country. He did not object to any combination of firms if they were not exploiting the public, but when'ty sawi trusts and combines creeping itrfco'the country to profiteer at the people's expense, the ; Liberal Party said a, tribunal of investi- ] gaifcion on ihe lines 1 of the Commission 3 on Trusts in Great Britain in 1919 , should' b» jnstituved.- Tha first thins that should be done with the profiteers ] was to abolish fines and make it mi-

prisonment, and then the cat. (Laughter.) ' The question had to be tackled. Tbe Liberaf Party claimed that thereshould be a Judicial enquiry into trmts or "associations' that controlled petrol, banking, cement, tobacco," wooUea .goods, etc'., 'in this country. „ (Applause.) Men were convicted in New Zealand connexion with the Bale of a pot of vaseline and an alarm clock, but it seemed the net was set for the s little J fish, and the bl;r ones were, let" go. a. Auckland .-was the headquarters of the cement combine. The*"' Liberal Party stood for a State Bank, and an Agricultural Bank as well. The president of the New Zealand Farmer 8 * j(Jnion ? Mr W. J. Poison, had characterised'the proposal for rural credit associations'as'farcical and an insult to the' intelligence of the executive of .the Farmers' Union. All round the country, small farmers were waiving up to the faottthat tho Mascey Party was not turning out tie friend of the farmer they Had expected it to bo. ' They recognised th t its "d----minifitration of the benefits of the Liboral Party was that*of a foster-father. and not a real father. (Laughter.) The old L'boral-Labour Partv drove* the piles of success and prosperity of this country. Something h d to bo done to help the farmers. They needed experimental farms such as the model dn»ry farm at Stratford, where the average production of butter-fat was increased from 16oib to 4021b per cow. On the subject of shipping, the Bpeaker said tho Government, producers, exporters, and importers should got together an<J formulate a scheme to carry tho Dominion's produce to the markets, of the world. Dpal ; rnsr. with the railways, Mr Wilford said the board Het up by tho Prime Minister was not a joko; it was a tragedy. There were two questions he wanted the Reform newspapers to answer. The first was that, seeing that the railwiys ran 586,127- "miles less this year than last year, and 1410-more men were employed, and that the expenditure had increased notwithstanding the fact that over less train miles had been run, by £80026. where does the economy and thrift come in? The second question .was how does it come about that the expenditure increased by v £801,126 when extraordinary increases have taken place in passengers' season tickets and goods tonnage? Where has loss come about, and whv have the railwavs lost nearly, £1,000,000? At the conclusion a vote of ihanks and confidence, and an expression that it was time a change of Government was brought about, was carried by an overwhelming majority. j

WESTLAND. .(special tq "the pbess.") GREYMOUTH, November 13. Mr jf. D, 'Lynch, Jftyor of Greymoutbv has definitely-decided &> C°, to I tho po!J for seat .as- «a | Indepepdont,lfefqrn>,cwdidate. , v ? .

NOTES FROM WELLINGTON. ME MASSET'S NORTHERN TOTJB. (SPECIAL TO "TttE PBESS."' WELLINGTON November 13. Interest in local politics is altogether overshadowed by the shipping trouble, and there is little of interest to report : beyond the fact, as was shrewdly suggested, that Sir Joseph Ward hai at last decided not to bo a candidate for Parliament at the forthcoming election. His friends and relatives were strongly against him again entering the political arena owing to health reasons, and this presumably has been the I deciding factor in his declining the advances of the Wellington North requisitionists. The Prime Minister. '" *" Mr Massey, who returned to Wellington yesterday, left again to-day for Hawke's Bay. His northern tour has been in the nature of a triumphant progress. Everywhere he had the most wonderful receptions, the audiences being enthusiastic to a degree, and unusually large. At the commencement of his tour he was rather tired after a lengthy session, and the arduous time in regard to administration and finance that ha went through, and his first speech had not the usual force in it. As his tour progressed, however, lie made some stirring speeches, and was in rare form. One who saw a good deal of the tour says that undoubtedly Mr Massey is going to do very well at the elections. He is due back here on Wednesday, and will speak at the Lower Hutt, in Mr Wilford's constituency, on Thursday evening. Notwithstanding what has been said to the contrary, Mr Massey found the returned soldier settlers favourable to him, and very grateful for all the Government had done in their interests. Capital and Labour. "Unfortunately there are those in New Zealand who are continually pitting capital against labour, and labour against capital," remarked Mr K. A. Wright, when speaking at Island Bay last night. "Capital and labour should work hand in hand; neither can do without the other. Instead of being mutual enemies they should work together for the one purposo of doing what is fair and just towards each other and towards the community." Soldier Settlers. Referring to suggestions that the Government are treating soldier settlers harshly, Mr W. H. Field, the sitting Keform member for Otaki, claimed that it could not be said that the Government had turned one soldier off his farm. If the men wished to stay on their properties they could do so. Mr Field added that to his mind the Government had paid too much for some of the land it had purchased, and should have revaluations made. Provision should also be made for assisting and advising soldier settlers. This was a step that would pay for itself ten times over. Speaking of, the situation generally, Mr Field said the outlook had greatly improved, but to keep the Dominion.on its present sound footing it was necessary to retain a sane. and safe Government in power. If the people returned the Massey all would be well.

NOTES FROM AUCKLAND. AMUSING CLAIMS OF EATANA. TO "THE PBKSS.") AUCKLAND, November 13." The speeches delivered in Auckland since ..the opening of the election campaign have been mainly of the stereotyped order of Party deliverances, but these have been some points of interest. The Minister of Education, for instance, is being warmly assailed 1 by both Liberal and Labour opponents. Exception is taken to what is termed Mr Parr's "School flag-waving propaganda." Miss Park's case, of course, has not been overlooked, and Mr Par/a alleged connexion with the abortive movement to form a progressive offshoot of the Reform Party during Mr Massey's visit to England in 191tf has been recalled. Mr Parr is making spirited replies to these criticisms, and everything in the Garden of Eden, if not exactly lovely, is at least lively. Roskill is another district that is enjoying animated meetings. Mr V. H. Potter, M.P., the Official Retorm candidate, is being heckled considerably, but his smartness in handling interjections is standing him in 'good stead. Miss Melville, the Independent Reform candidate, is putting up a good fight, and the Opposition oandidate, Mr Hall Skelton, is working hard. The issue at present seems uncertain. The Maoris of the Waikato and the King Country have some amusing in. pressions of the claims and professions of Mr H. T. Ratana, the Independent candidate for the Western seat. The Maoris say that Eatana who is a son of the Maori "prophet" of that namo, has declared that with the Divine assistance, he will within two years of being elected, right all the wrongs of the Maoris and rectify their grievances. One Maori put it very quaintly He Baid "Ratana has promised us he will see that all the land sold in the old days for barrel hoops and jews harps will be returned to us.'' The Maoris seem to think that he will so mesmerise Parliament from his Independent seat in the Hcuse, that legislation will be passed to make all this possible. Retorts which Maoris bring in are/to the effect that the candidate is being assisted by his father, who says that if his son is not returned, he proposes to iinnlv to outside nations to compel the Government to disgorge all misappropriated lands. The Maoris agree that the candidate has. little abijity as a I sneaker ha education, apparently, not havine gone beyond the third standard, and in his campaign he is accompanied bv a Maori who speaks for him. One educated native who discussed tTia candidate said that Ratana's poll tics were blind fanaticism, against which it was impossible to argue. The mana of Ratana, sen., he said, was de +£.» and Maoris who were not so EfSeSt they were still, torfason, were deserting the prophet's Wilford was very severe on profiteers in his address at Ngaruawahia Qaturdav More trusts and com 2? S li Mid had crept in during reb!nfvifrs than ever before. The only WDt n llv tor Profiteering should be impe? Sent Large companies guilty KKctioe could pay fines of £6*oo i i&OOO without much . trouble, whereas «npnson practice. What <?* W nnlr P had"to do was to deal with i h had"rept in during the BS ? to tho small farmers to In a S tie banner of the Liberal«°m6 vlUl where, he said, they beJ**S r stated t'hat since h« had been through 60 WEES**** of ? ew Zeala s d ' electorates.m d der Rp d one the small farmer n^™Tn ff back"to the old .regime. Mr Walford did not explain.'

AVON. MRS A, E. HERBERT AT ROLLESTON" STREET HAIi. Mrs A. E. Herbert, the Independent candidate for Avon, addressed tho electors in the Oddfellows' Hall, Kolleston street, Linwood, last night. All the seating accommodation was occupied, the audience including a goodly sprinkling of ladies. Mr A. Brettell presided, and on the platform were Nurse Maude, Dr. P. C. Fenwick, and Mr A. Smith. The chairman said his duty was easy, as Mrs Herbert was known to them all. The occasion was a pleasant one, as he believed it was the first cog of the wheel that was going to land Mrs Herbert at the top of the poll. _ He spoke of the great assistance given by Mrs Herbert, during the influenza epidemic period. Mrs Herbert, who was received with applause, said that she did not expect so large an audience, and she was sorry that there was not seating accommodation for all. They still heard the cry that "woman's place is the home," but woman had won her place, and the door which had been so difficult to open would not be again shut against woman. As a member of the Hospital Board she had found that its activities were hampered by the lack of necessary legislation. A woman whose husband was in the mental hospital got a monetary allowance; but a woman with an invalid husband got nothing; the wife with the invalid husband should be on the same footing as the wife with her husband in the mental hospital. She was in favour of pensions for the blind, and considered that there should be no difference made in the payments made to civil widows and epidemic widows: they should be placed on the same footing; 25s per week and 7s 6d for each child was little enough. She was in favour of the establishment of State farms where persistently defaulting husbands could be committed and employed on remunerative work, and their earnings given to their wives. On many occasions she had taken women who were very ill and whose husbands were defaulters, to the hospital doctor, who had told her that all that was the matter with them was that they were suffering from malnutrition. These defaulting husbands ought to be made to face their responsibilities. (Applause.) The cost of maintaining these deserted wives was great, and was one of the reasons that hospital rates were so high. On the State Farm the men should be made to work. She would say: "No work, no tucker." (Laughter.) She spoke strongly in favour of an amendment of the Crimes _ Act to provide for dealing more effectively with degenerate sexual offenders of both sexes, and emphasised the necessity for the more effective treatment of such cases. She regretted that Te-O-Bangi Home had been closed, as it provided a place where wayward girls could be dealt with. At present they did not know where to put girls suffering from horrible diseases. The Isolation Ward at the Hospital had been used for the purpose, but < with unsatisfactory results,' as the girls broke out. She was in favour of introducing new features in connexion with prison reform:, the prisons should bo self-supporting. She spoke strongly in favour of a "half-way" house between the mental hospital, and said that it was an absolute crime that old people who were suffering from nothing else than senile decay should be sent to the mental hospital. _ Speaking on the housing question, she described the conditions she had found in the course of her social work: in one four-roomed house, .there were 22., people living; one of the rooms was. filled with furniture. She would support any housing scheme that would provide better* and cheaper homes. The amount advanced undor the Advances to Workers' Act should be increased. The rents paid in some cases were outrageous. Time after time she had called the attention of the Department of Labour to the enormous: rents being paid for old houses, but she had never heard of any reductions resulting from these representations. She had been astonished 'with the manner in which workers exploited their fel-low-workers: often a worker let a room to a fellow-worker at a rent almost equal to what he paid for' the whole house. (A voice: Quite right!) Something should be done to _ prevent this exploitation. "Referring to education, matters, she thought, it regrettable that 90 per cent, of those who attended the primary schools did not go on to secondary schools; more should be encouraged toj go to the secondary schools. The, Dominion's secondary industries should receive all possible encouragement from the Government. The Government should make its rolling stock for the. railways in the Dominion; and the Dominion's wool should be manufactured into tweed in the Dominion. Dealing with unemployment, she urged that the Government should put public works in handy to absorb the unemployed. A vigorous afforestation scheme should be undertaken. She was not in favour of immigration at a time like the present, when there was so much unemployment. Greater care was necessary in preventing immigrants suffering from contagious diseases landing in the Dominion. ''Now I suppose I will have to tell you something about the land," Mrs Herbert said, "or you will think I know nothing about it." (Laughter.) She was not in favour, she said, of parting with any of the national endowment land. There was necessity for legislation to prevent aggregation; closer settlement was the best solution of the land question; and roading should precede settlemnet. Many returned, soldiers had failed on the land, largely due to,unreal and inflated land values; the Government should revalue these lands and give the soldiers a chance. (Applause.) Eeferring to the Government stoppage of subsidies to Nurse Maude's Nursing Association, Mount Magdala, and similar institutions, the candidate said that it was false economy on the part of the Government to economise at the expense of the public health. The Government had also done away with the health patrols, who had done valuable work in connexion with girls suffering from V.D. . Two had been employed, and though the Government had been urged >to retain them it had not been done. The Hospital Board had. retained one and the cost had to come out of hospital rates. Such charges ought not to be made on hospital rates. (Applause*) Referring to the valuable work of Dr. Blackmore at the Consumption Sanatorium, Mrs Herbert said that his work was nullified because there was no national policy. She spoke in favour of Dr. Blackmore's advocacy of a Lock hospital for undesirable consumptives. There was necessity for a serious attempt being made to deal with venereal disease. The Act required strengthening in the direction of compulsory attendance for treatment. In her concluding remarks Mrs Herbert said that she was standing as an independent; it was only after several deputations had waited upon her that she had ultimately consented to offer her services. She had also consulted some members of the Hospital Board, and Dr. Fenwick had told her: "Yon will have to stand, because unless we get women behind some of these movements we are never going to get anywhere." (Applause.) She would not bind herself to any party. If elected she would aid by every means in her power the passing of progressive legislation just as earnestly as any member pledged to any party, (Applause.) Dr. Fenwick, in a short speech, eulogised Mrs Herbert's work on the

Hospital Board. "I don't believe in her politics," he added, "or any politics at all. The country would be as well off with one party as another." Mr A. Smith and Nurse Maude also spoke briefly. Nurse Maude remarked that Mrs Herbert, if elected, could bring forward questions that men had not thought of and did not understand. Replying to questions, the candidate said that if Parliament was not a fit place for a woman, what was wrong with itf She did not think the hours would be too long. For some time past she had been working close on fifteen hours a day. She would support free school books for those with large families who could not afford to pay for them; at least, they should get the books at cost price. On a no-confidence motion, if it involved Massey remaining in power or Holland being put in power—there was not use in considering the Liberal Party as it stood at present —as she was no in favour of revolutionary methods, she simply could not vote for Holland—(applause)—and if the choice was between Holland and Massey, she would vote for Massey, much as she would hate to do so. Mr J. Lindlay moved, and Mrs Norgate seconded: "That this meeting of Avon electors expresses its utmost confidence in Mrs Herbert, and pledges itself to help her to win the seat." The motion was carried by acclamation. RICCARTON SEAT. MR G. WITTY AT RICOARTON. Mr George Witty, the Liberal candidate for the Riccarton electorate, opened his campaign in the Oddfellows' Hall, Riccarton, last night. " Mr T. Kewnham presided, and there was a good attendance. The chairman stated that the candidate had now represented the electorate for 20 years, and was respected by everyone, no matter whether they agreed with his politics or not. Mr Witty said that there were three candidates in the field, representing three parties, two of them Reform ana Labour, being extreme, the third being his own, the Liberals. With regard to the Reformers, their leader, Mr Massey, was a fine man looked up to by everyone, although there were many who did not agree with his politics. The speaker did not intend to refer to his opponents by name, although he would have to refer to their parties. There were tho Red Feds, for instance—

(.A voice: Out it out). Mr Witty: lam only referring to them by the name they are known by. I am going to say__what I mean. I am not going to mmce matters. This party, he went on to state, wanted to pull every one down to their own level instead of helping to lift the people up. They had not the ability to run the country. They could, metaphorically sneaking, pull down a mountain, but they could not build a match-box if the truth were to be told about them. As a matter of fact the Labour Party had no power. They showed this by not being able to stop the present' strike. The reason Labour members were so weak was that they were afraid of the right of recall. It would be a great pity if the Labour Party ever got into power because they would ruin the Dominion, and he had no hesitation in saying that New Zealand was too good a country to be ruinedRather than vote for that party he would do so for Air Massey, when it came to a choice between the two sides. ''God help New Zealand if the Labour Party ever got into power," he added. Italy had thrown out extreme Labour, so had Britain and so had Australia, and he believed that the Dominion would follow suit at this election. The Liberal. Party represented the safe course to adopt if the country was to get back to prosperity. The Reform Party, since it took office, had not repealed a single Act on the Statute Book,passed by the- Liberals, except< the Second Ballot Act, for which they had never brought forward any substitute. This record would show that the Liberal Party was all right and was quite sound in principle. One of the great troubles in New Zealand to-day was the want of better production.- There were too many rich and too many poor. A voice: Idle rich. Mr Witty: Yes, idle rich, and idle poor too. He went on to condemn the practice of striking. It was wvong, he said, that one man should be able to hold up ten. Every strike, he maintained, increased the cost of -living, and it was the women and children who suffered in every case. (Hear, hear.) He wanted it to be clearly understood, however, that he was not wholly in favour of the employers. For instance, there was the case of a shipping company, which although the wages of the men were reduced last month, had not made any move; to reduce passenger fares and freights. He had a suggestion to stop strikes. It was to pay ail heads of unions and secretaries tho same wages as the men themselves when out of work. If this were done, there** would soon be a stoppage of all' strikes. It had been said that he (Mr Witty) had voted for a reduction in the wages of the lower paid men and also for an increase in their hours of work. A voice: It is true. I read it in Hansard.

Mr Witty: I expected that, my deal} fellow. I have Hansard here. « Mr Witty denied having ever spoken on the matter. He wanted the interjector to take the lie hack to where it had come from. He had voted for the reduction of his own salary and those of other men enjoying good salaries, but had never voted for a reduction in the wages of the lower paid men. Mr Witty -Went on to speak of education. There "was far too much money spent on ©xpensivve buildings, he maintained, such, as high schools in the cities, whereas the money should be spent on buildings in the country, so as to give backblocks children a better chance in life. One direction in which a reduction could be made would be to do away with the system of each education board employing its own architect, as was the case at present. Passing on to the matter of immigration, Mr Witty said that the Government lwd made a hig mistake in bringing 20.030 immigrants to the country inside eighteen months,without making proper provision for them in the matter of employment and housing accommodation. He was of the opinion that the Government would be better advised to give more attention to the people of New Zealand themselves. Women were not afraid to bear children, but tbey did not want to face the position of] being unable to support them. A bond to be paid by the Government for every child born Would go ai long way towards remedying the present state of affairs. Criticising tho railway administration. Mr Witty said that too many lines were built into nonpaymg districts, while good roads were made alongside them, thereby encouraging the competition of motor traffic. yV hat tho Government should do was to inaugurate a motor service over the lines, as was done in America. Mr Witty strongly condemned the defence system, which he stated was far too expensive for its value to the country. He would remind his audience that at the time of the Great War the men who didt the best work, were those who were untrained, while those who had' undergone training were told to unlearn it as soon as possible." He considered that the cost of the upkeep of the Chatham was not worth whi!e. The vessel would be quite unable to defend the Dominion if war should break out. Whatiwould be of some use would bo a few aeroplanes and torpedoes. The Chatham was nothing more or less than an expensive toy. With reference to the meat pool, Mr Witty said that it had not been responsible I for any increase in the price I of meat as claimed by the Government. I

The reason meat Lad gona up in price was that Armour ana Company had been allowed to enter the held, 'llm banks had forced the meat pool. Willi regard to the proposed dairy pool; this was not wanted in the South Island, where 75 per cent, of the production was consumed. In the North Island high prices had been paid for land and the purchaser had got into the hands of tne banks. Mr Witty condemned the Government's policy with regard to the settlement of returned soldiers. Many of these men Had been settleu on land that was too much isolated, some of which had been purchased at £2O an acre, while it was only worth 10s an acre. A revaluation of the land was urgently needed, as it had been bought at too high a figure. The present Government had increased the national debt to such an extent that the people were unable to meet the taxation imposed on them, and were really tenants of the Jews and not of the Government. After reference to the rural bank proposal, Mr Witty stated that too little was being done in the direction of developing hydroelectrical schemes in the Dominion. The saving that could thus be effected in labour _ and' coal was enormous. It was a pity that such slow progress was being made in this direction. .Reverting to the strike position, he stated that it was high time that the Government took over the ferry service, which should be conducted as part of the railway system, of which the ferry service was merely a connexion. Concluding, Mr Witty said that the Liberals stood for work for every willing worker nt fair rates; land in small areas being allotted or disposed of on easy terms to those who were willing to become primary producers; strengthening the powers of the Board of Trade so as to prevent profiteering and monopoly; moral teaching in schools— Christianity—not religious or sectarian bitterness, the elimination of middlemen's profits, the encouragement of those with capital to engage in some industrial ente'rprise that would directly benefit the State, and for other reforms to benefit the people. Mr Wittv was accorded a vote cf thanks for his address.

TO-NIGHT'S MEETINGS. Sir It. Heaton Rhodes, Southbridge Hall, 8 p.m. The Hon. W. Nosworthy, Theatre Royal, Ashburton, 8 p.m. The Hon. G. W. Russell, New Brighton Pier (upstairs), 8 p.m. (Friends and supporters.) Air j. McCombSj Opawa Public School (Old), 8 p.m. (Friends and supporters.) Mr L. M. Isitt, Rugby street schoolroom, 8 p.m. The Rev. J. K. Archer, Young Men's Hall, Wmton street, 8 p.m. Mr H. S. S. Kyle, Yaldhurst, 8 p.m. Mr G. Witty, Islington Hall, 8 p.m. Mr J. A. McCullough, Orange Hall, Greendale, 8 p.m. Mr S. Andrew, Mason's Flat School, 8 p.m. Mr David Jones, Oust Hall, 8 p.m. Mr R. D>. Martin, Waikuku Hall, 7 p.m.; Oddfellows' Hall, Woodend, 8 p.m. Mr D. Buddo, Marshland Hall, 8 p.m. Mrs A. Herbert, Rolleston street Hall, 8 p.m. (General Committee meeting.) Dr. Thaoker, East ' Christchurch schoolroom, Gloucester street, 8 p.m. CHRISTCHUROH SOUTH. Mr H. C. Lane, Reform candidate for Christchurch South, will open his campaign in the Somerfield School on Thursday, at 8 p.m. A general meeting ,of Mr Lane's friends and supporters will be held in St. Michael's schoolroom tomorrow, at 8. p.m. ■ Mr H. G. Ell,. Independent candidate for Christchurch South, addressed a> well-attended meeting at Selwyn Btreet scholroom last evening and received an attentive hearing. ; BIOOARTON. Mr HY S. S. Kyle, Reform candidate for Riccarton, spoke at ; Whitecliffs and Glentunnel last, night. There was a good attendance at each place, though the weather conditions were most unfavourable. A vote of thanks and confidence was accorded the speaker at each meeting. , Avon - . Lieut.-Col. A. E. Loach, Reform candidate for Avon, will open his campaign in the Joyland Theatre, New Brighton, to-morrow evening at 8 o'clock. The Mayor of New Brighton (Mr J. Gamble) will preside. LYTTELTONV A meeting of friends and supporters of Mr R. Macartney was held in the Heathcote Drill Hall on Saturday evening. Mr Macartney, who was present, briefly addressed the meeting. A strong committee was formed, Mr G. Thom6on being elected chairman and Mr L. Salt secretary. Mr J. McG'ombs addressed' a meeting of friends and supporters in the Oddfellows' Hall, Lyttelton, last night. The hall was crowded. The Mayor (Sir W. T. Lester) presided. All present formed themselves into a committee to work for the success of Mr McCombs's candidature. Mr P. C Shirley was elected secretary. KAIAPOI. A very enthusiastic, meeting of Mr D. Jones's friends and supporters was held in the Mairehau Hall on Wednesday evening. Twenty of those present formed themselves into a committee to secure Mr Jones's return, and apologies were received from several who stated that they would be pleased to act on the'committee. Mr J. L. Parish was appointed chairman, Mr G. Lintott deputy-chairman, and Mr J. E. M. Rountree secretary. It was decided to ask Mr Jones to speak in the hall on Monday, 20th inst., and to ask him to deal with the dairying question, this being practically a dairying district. The committee thought that it would not be necessary for Mr Jones to give more than one address, as they intend mapping out the district and making a thorough canvass of all the parts. Mr R. D, Martin addressed the electors in the Mairehau Hall on Saturday evening, Mr W. J. Walter presiding, and was accorded a unanimous vote of thanks and confidence. ASHBURTON. Mr George Wright, the Liberal-La-bour candidate for the Ashburton seat, is commencing his campaign by addressing the electors in the outlying osnires. He had' a moderately good attendance at Tinwald, with Mr H. B. MUlichamp, chairman of the Tinwald Town Board, in the chair. Mr Wright was accorded a hearty vote of thanks. Mr Wright intend* delivering his principal speech at the Ashburton Theatre "Royal towards the end of the month, on which occasion it has been arranged that Mr Wilford, Leader of the Opposition, will be present. After Mr Wright has spoken, Mr Wilford will deliver a political address. WAIBAU. (PBESS ASSOCIATION" TELKGRAM.) BLENHiEDI, November 13. Mr R. McCalhwn, M.P., opened his

campaign in Bknlieim to-night before a large and appreciative andki>ce. Ho ! announced himself as & Libera! adhering to the Liberal principle of the historic i Liberal Party. He believed Sir Ji«r-ph j Ward was Mr Massey" s only possible j rival. He \vou"d only pledge himself to j such a leader. He condemned the finan- j cinl methods and borrowing policy ot 1 { the Reform. Government, but sympsi- J thised with Mr Massey over Iris attempt j to bring expenditure under revenue, j Ho severely criticised the Government j oyer the mismanagement of the Valuation Department, nnd the departure from the sound financial policy laid down by Sir Joseph Ward in his manifesto of August, 1919. Differing from the Reform candidate, Mr McCollum praised the management cf the Post and Telegraph Department. CHSBORKE. (FSKftS ASSOCIATION XKUKMUH.) GISBORNE, November 13. Mr T. Brindle, Labour candidate for Gisborne, delivered his opening address to-night. The candidate outlined tho Labour policy, declaring that his party aimed at the goal of social democracy. He denied that there was anything about Sovietism in the Labour Party's platform, and agreed with Mr Massey that the fight was between Reform and Labour, or, as he (Mr Brindle) put it, between "the robbers and the robbed." The Liberal candidates were futile; their only purpose was to split the votes in favour of the Government. Asked whother his party approved of the principle of the Arbitration Court, Mr Brindle answered that it was not u •|uestion of favour or otherwise; they were compelled to fee in favour of it whether they liked it or not. The Court was not fair, as at present conMituted. A Court which refused to take exorbitant profits into consideration, but enly considered (he household budget; was not a (lung to bo jroud of. Labour stood for the reorganisation of The Court. There would not bo indui?lri:il peace until the workers in an industry owned and controlled that indus'try. BTJLLER. (PRESS ASSOCIATION TELECBAM.) WESTPORT, November 13. At the Theatre Royal to-night,- Mr John Menzies, Independent candidate, addressed a largo and enthusiastic meeting of electors, and was given & very attentive hearing. He explained his policy, which included support of the freehold. He was opposed to the reduction of salaries of Civil Servants drawing £3OO or under. He advocated placing the railways in the hands of an administration composed of capable business men. He was opposed to reductions in teachers' salaries, and expenditure on school buildings, and urged more consideration to disabled soldiers, and the speeding up. of hydroelectric schemes. He spoke highly of the stamp of immigrants coming out, and believed they were doing and would do good service to the country. He strenuously protested against the introduction of sectarianism into politics, and repudiated the charge made by his opponent. Mr Menzies said he was seeking election as an Independent candidate, independent so far as voting with any party, so far as any particular Bill was concerned, but on a no-confidence motion he would vote with the Reform Party. The candidate was accorded a vote of thanks by acclamation. CANDIDATES ANNOUNCED. In the subjoined list of candidates at the general election R. signifies Reform; 1.R., Independent Reform; Lib., Liberal; I. Lib., Independent Liberal; Lib.-Lab., Liberal Labour; Lab., Labour; Ind., Independent; and C.P., Country Party. The members of the 1919-22 Parliament are marSed with an asterisk:—

NORTH ISLAND SEATS. Bay of Islands. .. •Reed, V. H. . . ' . R. Bell, Allen . . . I. Lib. Shadbolt, E. F. . ■ ■. ' . Lab. Marsden. Jones, W. . . . R. Murdoch, A. J. . Lib.-Lab. Meredith, F. . . . I. Kaipara. •Coates, Hon. J. G. . . R. Hornblow, R. E. . Lib.-Lab. Waitemata. •Harris, • A. . . . R. Burbush, F. H. . Lib.-Lab. Way, R. F. . . . Lab. Eden. •Parr, Hon. C. J. . R. Morton, F. S. - . Lib.-Lab. Mason, H. G. R. . . Lab. Auckland Bast. •Mackenzie, Clutha . . R. Lee, J. A. ... Lab. Auckland Central. •Parry, W. E. . Lab. Glover, A. E. .. . I. lib. Auckland West. •Savage, M. J. . . Lab.* Farrell, J. ... R. Grey Lynn. •Bartram, F. N. . « Lab. Holdsworth, W. J. . I.R. Boskill. •Potter, V. H. . . . R. Skelton, A. Hall . . Lib. Melville, Miss E. . , I.R. Purtell, J. . . Lab. Pamell. •Dickson, J. S. . . . R. Wren, S. M. . . . R. Mcßnne, O. . Lab. Noton, William . . Lib. Manukau. •Lang, Sir F. W. . . R. Jordan, W. J. . . Lab. Adnams, D. . . k . I. Franklin. •Massey, Right Hon. W. F. R. Rea, J. . . . Lib.-Lab. Raglan. •Bollard, R. F. . . . R. Thompson, W. A. . Lib.-Lab. Lye, S. C. . . . Lib.-Lab. Thames. •Rhodes, T. W. • . R. Allan, W. A. . . Lib.-Lab. Ross, A 1. Ohinemuri. •Poland, H. . Lib.-Lab. Donaldson, D. . Lib.-Lab. Allan. Colonel S. S. . . R. Colbeck, Captain F. . C.P. Tauranga. •Herries, Sir William . • R. Johnstone, L. .. . . Lib. Hamilton. •Young, J. A. . . . R. Lafferty, C I. Richards, A. S. . • Lab.

Waikato. , Lye, y. '..,*• ... . **b. Johnson. J. T. • • *• Sotorua. •Hockly.F. F- • .. ■ . - *; O.inkard, C. F. . . Lib.-Lab. Bay of Plenty. •Williams,-K. S. . . - RAYaitomo. •Jennings. W. T. . . Lib. Rolleaton, J.- C. •. • • *• aiibor&e. •Lysnar, W. D< . - ■ . K. Wildish, G. . . Lib.-Lab. Prindle, T. Lab. Hawke's Bay. Russell, Sir Andrew . - R. McKay, Gilbert . - Lib. Chapman, G. H. . Lab. • Napier. •Brown, J. Vigor . . It. Jull, A. E. . . lad. Mason, J. . • &• M'llvfide, L. . Lab. Mulranah, E. . Ind. Lab. . Wajpaica. •Hunter, Sif George . . R. Langridge, J. J. . Lib.-Lab. Pabiatua. •McNicol, A, ■ . . «. R. Ransome, A. E. . . Lib-Lab. Masjertoa. •Sykes, G; R. • . • . » RErans, F. C. . . . Lab. Holms, A. C. . . . Ind. ', Walrarapa. •M'Leod, A. D. . . K. Card, J. W. . . Lib.-Lab. Stratford. •Masters, R. .' . . Lib-Lab. Hine, J. B. . . . R. Taranakl. •Smith, S. G. . . . Ind. Bellringer, C. E. , . R. . Egmont. •Hawken, 0: . . . R. Astbury, D. L. A. . .Lib.-Lab. •Patea. •Dixon. E.* '. ... R. Pearce, G. V. '. . . it. Corrigan, J. R. . . • lib. Wanganni. •Veitch', W.'A. .* . . Ind. Ross. J. . . * • Lab. Coull, J. .... it. Pope,' J. B. . . » Lib. Waintariae. •Smith, R. W. . . . Lib. M'Lean, D. D. . . . R. Langstone, F. . . . Lab. Goldfinch, G. . . Lib.-Lab. ; Orooa. •Guthrie,' Hon. D. H. . . R. Cobbe, R. . . . Lib.-Lab, Manawatu, Linklater, J. . . . R. Whibley, F. B. . . . Lib. Murdoch, W. . . . Lib. Flyger.'H. T. . . Lib.-Lab. Bangitlkei. •Glenn, W. S. . . . ,R. Burnett, C. H.- . . lad. Brady, F. F. . . . Lab/ ■■ . Palmerston.. •Nash. J. A. . . . R. Christensen . . Lab. Hodgens, J. . . . Lab. Otakt •Field, W. H. . v . R. McClure, G. H. .. Lib-Lab. Hutt. •Wilfdrd, T.M. . \. Lib.; Bennett, V H. D. . . B. Pritohard, D. K. . v Lab. Wellington Nirth.; •Luke, Sir John . V R; Young, J. ' ; ' . Lib.-Lab. Combs, H. E. .".•■ .-,.•'"•. Lab. Wellington Central. •Fraeer, P. . . . Lab. Bennett, W. H. . . . . R., Sievwright, A. B. . . Ldb.-Lab. Wellington Skit Forsyth, T. . .1 ..', R. McVicar, Mrs A. . . lad. McDonald, T, W. ... - . 1«4.' Monteith, A.! L. . . Lab. Wellington South. •Mitchell, G. . . Ind/ McKeen, R. . . . Lab. Wellington Suburb! •Wright, R. A. . . R. Crbakery, A. W. . ■ Lab.' SOUTH ISLAND SEATS. Kelson. ♦Atmore, H. . . Lib. Gilbert, A. . . ."■ R. Motneka. •Hudson, R. P. . R. Patterson, R. . " Lib.-Lab. Boiler. ♦Holland, H. E, Lib. Menuica, J. . Ind. Westland. •Seddon, T. E. Y. . » Lib. Steer, J. . . R. O'Brien, J. . . . Lab. Wafiau. •McCallum, R. . - Lib. Girling, W.J. . . - R. HurunuL •Forbes, G. W. » Lib. Andrew, S. . . . . R. Xaiapei. •Jones, D. R. Buddo, Hon. D. . . lib. Martin, R. D. . Ind.-Lab. Chrißtcbnrcb Hutu. •Isitt, L. M. . . Lib. Archer, Rev. J. K. . Lab. Andrews, E. H. . . I.&. Cnristcnureu Bast. •Thacker, H. T. J. . . Lib. Derereux, W. R. . R. Armstrong, H. T. ..''." Lab. Cfiristclmrch South. •Howard, E. J. . Lab. Lane, H. O. . . . S. Ell, H. G. Ind.-Lib. RlcctztOS. •Witty, G. Lib. Kyle, H. S. S. . . R. McCullough, J. A. . . Lab. Aron. •Sullivan. D. G. « Lab. Loach, A. E. . R. Herbert, Mrs A. E. . Ind. Russell, Hon. G. W. . . . Lib. Lyttelton. •McCombs, J. Lab. Macartney, R. . . R. Bllesmaxa •Rhodes, Sir R. Heaton . R. Ashbmton. •Nosworthy, Hon. W. R. Jones, H. M. . - . lib. Cooke, F. R. - • . . Lab. Wright, G. . Lib.-Lab. Timaru. Rolleston, F. J. . . R. Vinneil, P. C. . . Lab. Tenrakft. *Bnrn«tt, T. I>. . . R Langford, T. H. . Lib.-Lab. Needham, P. R. . . Ind.

WaitakL •Bitchener, J. . * •_ ?• Paul, W. J. . « . Lab. Oamarn. •Lee, Hon. E. P. . . . R. Macpherson, J. A. . Lib.-Lab. Dunedin North. •Mnnro.J. W. . . . Lab. CUrk, J. J. . . . B. Dunedin West. •Stewart. Hon. W. Downie . E. Mow, CM. . . . LabDunedin Central. •Stathnm, C. E. . . Lib-Lab. Gilchrist. J. Lab. Maslin, W. S. . Ind. Lib.-Lab. Dunedin South. •Sidey, T. K. . . Lfl>. MacManus, J. B. , , Lab. Chalmers. •Dickson, J. M. . » R. Stephens, J. ... Lab. Clutha. •Malcolm, A. S. <. R. •Edie, J L. Wakatipu. •Horn, J. . . » ■ Lib. Ritchie. J. RShortland, F. W. „ » Ind. Mataora. •Anderson, Hon G. J. . . R. McDougall, J>. . . Li^.-Lab. Wallace. •Hamilton, A. • ■ • B. Thomson, J. 0. . . I. Lib. InvercargilL •Hanan, Hon. J. A. . . Lib. Farrant, H. J. . . . Lab. Awarua. •Hamilton, J. R. . . . R. De la Perrelle. P. . . Lib. Mclntyre, N. . . • Ind. MAORI REPRESENTATIVES. Southern Maori •Urn, H. W. R. McDonald. P. . . R. Barrett, W. D. * Ind. Northern Maori. •Heanre.T. . R. Brown, N. « . Lib-Lab. , Taoro, A. R. . . • Ind. Eastern Maori. •Ngata, Hon. A. T. . . lib. Taranaki Te Ua. . . I.R. Western Maori •Pomaie, Sir Maui . . R. Ratana, H. T. . . . Ind.

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THE GENERAL ELECTION., Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 17611, 14 November 1922

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THE GENERAL ELECTION. Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 17611, 14 November 1922

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