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THE ELECTION CAMPAIGN.

GOOD SHOWING OF REFORMERS. STATEMENT BY MR MASSEY. (special to "the PRESa.") AUCKLAND, November 8. | Tie Prime Minister left Auckland to-night on his way to New Plymouth, where lie is to make a speech to-morrow evening. Deputations relating to local matters occupied some of his time today. and tlie stream of visitors scarcely tailc-d all day. Mr Massey will be at Stratford on Friday and at Masterton on Saturday, returning to Wellington on Sunday. The election campaign, the Prime Minister remarked to-day, was not j>rovitiiiig surprises. The Reform candidates in all parts of the country appeared to be doing excellently, but he had expected' them to do that. He had not had reason at any time to doubt tl'.e strength either of the Reform Party or of the principles it represented The people of New Zealand knew* ns well as he did that what the country needed just now was careful finanoe, stnble government, and sound administration. The rival Oppositions scarcely pretended to offer these things, and certain.y would not be in a position in any circumstances to supply them. The Liberal candidates were declaring, as their party leader had done, tluit proportional representation witu the country quota was a part of the policy of their party. The more attention they drew to that plank the better for the Reform Party. He would pass over the fact that the Labour section of the Opposition wan'ced to abolish the country quota altogether. The plain truth was that the quota could rot be preserved in an effective form under proportional representation. The system demanded' very large electorates, and required, further, tliat each vote should have on equal value. The creation of the very large electorates would involve the grouping of rural and urban communities in most instances, and if the country electors were given nominally the advantage of the quota, •when the electorates were being formed, they would lose the advantage on polling day, when actual and not nominal yoting strength would be the test. Another plank that was being displayed prominently by the. Liberals was the State Bank, but tho Liberals ■were not explaining just what they meant by this. The Government at present was a partner in the Bank of New Zealand and was drawing from that institution in dividends and taxar tion a total sum of nearly £600,000 a year. The Commonwealth Bank, which was being quoted as an example by the Literals, gave the Australian Government no revenue at all. If the Opposition's idea was that the New Zealand Government should start a new bank to compete with the Bank of New Zealand, ne would reply that each a scheme would amqnnt merely to an attack upon the gooso that was laying the golden eggs. If the Government was to take over the Bank of New Zealand, he would poi.pt out that the purchase would be exceedingly expensive, -and that, the present was a singularly inopportune time for any financial venture of the ind. The Gov. eminent needed all its money for much more purposes. Anything in the nature of confiscation of the interests of the present shareholders of the Bank was out of the'question. The Government would not consider such a measure for a moment, and if it did, the credit of the Dominion would suffer moat * seriously. It struck: him as ceing a little amusing that this State Hanking proposal should be coming from people who were so fond .of suggesting that th® Reform Government was reckless in its financial methods, (rasas association telegram.) AUCKLAND, November 8. Mr Massey intends to return to 'Auckland in about ten days' time, spending several days in the district. Cater he will visit several centres in the South Island. Mr Massey expresses himself confident of the success of the Reform Party. : A COMMUNIST CATECHISM. THE LABOUR PASTY AND THE CHILDREN. t (SPECIAL to "ths PRESS.") . OAMARiIT, November 8. In referring to Ip Holland's party, the 'Hon. E. P. Lee, in a speech delivered'in ihe Opera House t to-night, dealt' with a Communist catechism for Sunday school children, which, he ttated, the Socialistic party wei* making efforts to introduce, in New Zealand.- r One of the items in tjie catechism, he said, read: "A boy or girl • l&duid be leiu-ned a real, live, burning,' red-hot revolutionary speech, to take about fen minutes' time." , Another item in it was: "Your duty, boys and mis, ( when your turn pomes to enter tip© workshop, is to take control of the • output. "It does not matter what the job, is. If-you don't, then you will live and die tt- slave." Still another item, r wa6:'l would adyiae ony ofyou,whenWeranythingtroubles you, to take a jnonth; or, for that matter, two months, holiday, from work. An impossibility! Why? , The first thine, may I tell you, is to convino* yourself. Why should'you not have a month's holiday P Why not two months, or more jf ; yoa.desire itP Why? Slaves? Why, ini' the name of Cmist, will you not xnakethe demand P" 'Even the Boy Scout movement was' coydred' in the catechism, which con-' tained the following questionnaire: ■ • :<< Teacher: Can a boy Socialist be pi Boy-'Scout? ' | "Scholar: No, comrade. ' "Teacher: Why cannot a. boy Socialist Eeva Boy ScoutP ' "Scholar : Because a Boy Soouthiis tosaluta the Union Jack. v cialist salute the Union Jack? ' : , .an.<emblem of oppression and- slavery." rTifefie were Bome- of the principles which the party ledby Mr Holland •would instill into the minds of phe chilit ever had any red) control .of she< affairs of the country. The danger hp saw was that if tbs present wflp not returned with a / 3Biajoritj-, . the' Leader, of the admitted thai he would • mate the followers j»f Mr Hol,]q'nd, if tip could get a sufficient num■ii%9r of jnembprs, to fiwb.ffc-Qayexh-jajSjt,then bring in the system of pro* ) rational representation, snd go to the • , guierea- proportional itionwasßot suitable for the requirements of -the Dominiop, and the Gov>&mnent -was strongly opposed to it. Tfoe system • meant thnt a district would .hitve no particular representative. The districts would be and tho' people' of any one distract would not knbw who their representative was; That #omd nQt, £s■fejtj satisfy ithe' people of the Dominion, jaiid he-hoped that the .two' .parties he had ipenfcioned would r ßbt,»B'a-result'of>tl!€i^lectjori, v havean opportunity of canying out the scheme tie had 1 sketahed.' (Applause.):

HON. E. P. LEE.

SPEECH AT OAMARU. (special to "the pbess.")' I OAMARU, November 8. I Though no Opposition candidate is I yet in sight to contest .the Oa.maru seat, j against the Minister of Justice, thetton. j E. P. Lee has been busy during the j past week delivering addresses in different parts of the electorate,. and at j each place visited the settlers have extended to him a very cordial reoßption. On all sides Mr .Lee's A'tu'iiawuiiiiuy i" 'M iiua il la uouaiueiea wal Ujuu ii lli> uuns at piebeut in uc uioti'icu nlio coiuil wrest h\jui iiiiu iuv uuiuaru seat., wiucu uc iiua iieiU since lUxi. io-iiignt Air Houoe, Uiuua.ru, reaving veiy attentive neai'iug. m a cut-ai uiu decisive niiuiiiei - tile Jiiiiiobor ueait exiia-usaveiy witn a very wiue range oi I'ariiaineutary ana questions winch have been prominently betore tlie puunc and delved closely into tne hnauciai atlairs oi tlie country to-day, and summarised interestingly the piesent political situation. iie contended that there was great need for a strong Administration led by a strong man. Mr Massey was the most outstanding figure in Parliament to-day, and this had been admitted by the leader of the Opposition (Mr Wilt'ord), when he said the Government was a one man Government. (Applause.) The present Govment was a stable Government, with a full knowledge of its responsibilities to | the people and of their needs, and this and its achievements were fully recognised uy tiie people of the Dominion. Speaking of the other two parties ivt the House, Air Lee said that Mr Holland's party was a misnomer, it did not represent the real Labour intercuts of the Dominion. It was revolutionary and had very little consideration for the Empire and he believed that if a referendum were taken, it would be found that real Labour would denyj the party its support. As for the omcial Opposition party, Mr Wilford was. not strong enough to get the support of all the members of his side of the House, so he questioned the chance he would have of getting together a strong and stable Government. He would not say that Mr Wilford and his party adopted Mr Holland's but there was a danger of his party linking up with Mr Holland's party; to; bring about the Government's defeat. ' In referring to the future, Mr Leo said he hoped that the dovernrcxrit would continue to exercise the most rigid economy, but not in the of stopping developments, so that the, big burden of taxation which, was on; the people to-day would be easpd. He h<j»ped to see improvement in the'railway management. There was need , for it, : but now that the General Manager jl-nd been released of a good deal of administration work, and a Board'established, he believed the desired improrvraent would be achieved. At t!he conclusion of his audresi, Mr Lee was warmly applauded. NQTES FROM AUCKLAND. (SPECIAL TO " THE PRES3."> ; AUCKLAND,. November's. The election campaign in Ajickland Province is proceeding steadily,; additional interest in matters political being added\ this week by the presence of the Prime Minister in his <jwn elec>torate. • I \ The candiSates for the city jconstituencieß are now hferd at work, and the meetings for the most part have been remarkably orderely. Mr V'. H. Potter, the present member for Roskill, is, however, an exception to this rule, and usually has a- hostile and • noisy element among, his audience. Mr Potter, however, scores very heavily ; off interjections, and his opponents'help rather than hinder him and add interest to his meetings. The Labour candidate for Eden, Mr Mason, took thie opportunity in -his opening address ,to refer to the question of loyalty; and Baid the practice of Hags in the' ..public schools. waa'"a fcheap advertisement for politicians.' Ris arguments were not convincing, and he is unlikely to.make any headway against Mr Parr.. ■ One of the most interest! ng * contests will be that between Wrry and Mr Albert Edward Glover' in Auckland Central, j Mr who previously represented the district . for eleven yeara, isi stated to be preparing for a big efforp to recapture the seat and is working guietly but assiduously among his "go<ia people." Neither candidate in this (district has yet; addressed the electoral ' ' i "J_ ' HON.;a. J. ANDERSON AX OOBS. ■ I ■ ..... '' • ' (fpREBS ABSOOIAnOW TELEOHAM.) j * GORE, Norembier 8. Tbi Hon. G- J. Anderson, Minister for. pabour, addressed a large meeting jat . Gore. ,He reiviewed the done by the Government and replied forcefully to critics who alleged wafjte. He cited maiiy instancies of savings in departments , under his own control, and justified the ; increased expenditure on .health and.education which was necessary for the future welfare of the country. ,He claimed that hip administration had resulted in an iujprovement in the labour laws to benefit the employer and the employed and that there had, been fewer and less f.tir-reaching strikes in the Dominion than any other country. - . The strenuous times ahead demanded /careful piloting.. There was still. I difficulty in regard, to private finance"and other respects, and tne narty which i had carried the countrv _ through ■ the f troubles of the war aria - its aftermath! was best qualified to bring it back to normality. ; . The. real opposition was' extreme Lflb-> our, whose "Socialistic ; policy would never suit a British community. A vote of thanks and confidence was carried unanimously. CLOSING OF No. 2 SUPPLEMENTARY ROLLS. Although registrars of electors are. receiving fairly large numbers of applications for enrolment, it is possible that many have not yet gone to the trouble to ascertain if their, names appear on the roll of the electoral distribt in which they reside. Those possessing ' the necessary qualifications who! have not enrolled, or whose names, do not appear on the roll of the district'where they are residing, should note that the opportunity for getting on the rioll will Boon be passed. The iNo. 2 Supplementary Rolls will close about'a fortnight before polling day that is the 18th or 20th inst., andi tfabse, entitled ■to • registration -jvill be well advised if they wish tqf exercise their vote at the approaching-general election, to immediately ascertain if ibliey, v are on ■ -the_ roH : and, /if liot, to send in an application 'for' enrolment without delay. ' 1 ' I ;

NOTES FROM WELLINGTON.

I SIB JOSEPH WARD'S POSITION, j I• - ' (special to "the press.") • WELLINGTON. November 8. I Sir Joseph Ward's decision not to j contest the Invercargill seat was ani nouneed to-day. It will be noted that there is nothing in the telegrr.m he has sent to the spokesmen of the Invercargill deputation to indicate that he will not be a candidate for another scut. It is still being stated here that lie may contest the "Wellington North, seat, but | so far as can be gathered there is no actual authority for the statement. There are at present three candidates in the fitsld for "Wellington North —Sir John Luke, who has represented the constituency in tlie last Parliament; Mr Young, the Wilford candidate; and Mr Combs, the Labour candidate. With Sir Joseph Ward, Mr Young, and Mr Combs in the held. Sir John Luke's cluvnoes of victory would be quite good, as at the last election he had a largo majority. Mr Wilford to Tour the Dominion. Mr T. M. Wilford, Lender of the Opposition, who since Parliament adjourned has been devoting a good deal of attention to his own constituency, is now on a tour of the northern electorates. He will speak in the Town Hall at Auckland on Monday night. Later he will tour the South Island. "The Man who has Most Must Pay." Mr A. W. Croskerv. a Labour candidate, addressing the electors last n : ght, said: "You have Hobsnn's choice in the matter of the wage reduction. It is only a matter of commnnscnse. Vote for the Labour candidate. The Labour Party intends to seo that the roan who has more than lie wants or knows what to do with pays his fair whack." Wellington North. Towards the end of Sir John Luke's meeting here last night, Labour men at the back of the hall frequently interrupted, and some rather unusual questions were handed up at the e'ose of hisi speech. One, apparently, was of a personal nature, for Sir John stated that he would not answer any questions that had reference to his wife. One questioner asked, "Would you lie in favour of commandeering Government House for the purpose of homing several homeless families " Sir John answered "No," very emphatically. THE LABOUR PARTY. MB HOLLAND'S REPLY TO MR MASSEY. (press association telegrams.) WESTPORT, November 8. In a political address to-night, Mr H- E. Holland, chairman of the Parliamentary Labour Party, dealt with Mr Massey's charges against the Labour Party in his recent manifesto and repeated at Papakura. He said Mr Massey had repeatedly promulgated the deliberate representation that the Labour Party stood for insurrectionary action to bring about the changes whieh the working class movement desired. His (Mr Holland's) utterances both in Parliament and from the public piatrorin as. wen as those of leuuwmembers sufficiently answered such foolish propaganda. The fact that Mr Massey deemed it necessary to resort to these repeated mis-statements revealed the desperate plight in which the Government found themselves. Physical force, revolution, confiscation and disloyalty were tne four favourite charges which were now being levelled against the Labour Party. The Labour platform was a complete a newer to the insurrection and confiscation charges, the disloyalty charge answerg itself. Working men who fought on the hills of Gallipoli and the fields of Flanders, who came back wounded a.nd well were now denounced as disloyalists. The returned disabled aoldior ptatyttng in Labour's 'interests to Auckland, mothers whose sons died in the firing line, young widows whose husbands fell defending the property and interests of the very men who were defaming them Were to be proclaimed disloyal because they dared to participate in Labour's political struggle for freedom. Men and women who laboured and toiled in the fields, gathered the grain, mined the coal, manned the ships, builded the mansiouis as well as tho hovels., were called disloyal because they seek, by constitutional methods, to make political changes involving the dismissal of Mr Massey, because they seek to usher in ail era of social righteousness, and the mien who call them disloyal are they who traded on both the soldiers and the home people as profiteers'during and aince the < war period. '•lf-to stand foi' the profiteers and against the people is disloyalty," he said, "then the .Labour Party is disloyal. If to stand for the preservation of every'principle of human freedom and British liberty is loyalty, then the Labour Party, beyond contradiction, is the most loyal party in this country." TEST QUESTIONS TO CANDIDATES. The National Council of Women of New Zealand, has formulated the following questions to candidates:— 1. Are you in favour of married mothers haying equal rights and responsibilities in regard to their children with the fathers? 2. Are you in favour of the removal of all sex disqualifications in the appointments to the Public Service? 3. Are you in favour of extending i the principle of - payment of prisoners bo as to include Jill men committed to gaol for failure to obey maintenance ; orders? j 4.' Are you in favour of women J.P.'s? s_. Are you in favour of women police to work in the interests of women and children? 6. Are you in favour of the establishment of an institution intermediate between a mental hospital and a gaol for delinquents of sub-normal tendencies? A STATE BANK. In reply to a question the Hon. G. W. Russell stated at New Brighton that the question of a State Bank required very careful consideration. In .1894 he had moved in the House that the Bank of New Zealand should be taken over and made a State Bank, but the proposal was defeated. He 'still held the Bank could, with great advantage, be taken over by the State, but if so it must be run solely as a business concern, and free from . politics. The State would have to pay the full market valivd of the shares. Already the State owned a very large interest in the Bank. Those who attacked . the Banks should iremember that during the recent financial crisis the Bank of New Zealand brought out from London £14,000.000 to help the country. Thie other Banks also «d especially the National, the other New Zealand institution, .These facts showed the' matter would require thq ' most careful consideration.

SIR JOSEPH WARD.

DECLINES INVITATION TO CONTEST INVEECASGILL. (press association telegram.) WELLINGTON, November 7. The following telegram was despatched by Sir Joseph Ward to-day to Mr Taylor, spokesman of the deputation which waited upon him in luvercargill requesting him to stand for the Invercsirgiil seat: —"After lull consideration I very much regret.that I cannot see my way at the present time, and under the present circumstances, to accept the invitation to contest the Invercargill seat. I sincerely thank one and all for their warm and enthusiastic promise of support, which I shall ever remember wit'> feelings of gratitude.'' (Signed) J. 6. Ward. RICCARTON. Mr H. S. S. Kyle, Reform candidate for Riccartou, opens his campaign at Whitecliffs and Coalgate on Monday next. He will 6peak at Charing Cross and Greendale on Tuesday, 14tn. and will address the electors at Fenaalton on Wednesday, loth. LYTTELTON. A meeting of friends and supporters of Mr J. McCombs was held in the Woolston Public School last night. Seventy-eight persons were present, and formed themselves into a committee to promote 'Mr McCombs's candidature. Mr C. Hill was elected chairman and Mr G. Owen secretary. A strong executive was appointed, and also a ladies' committee. AVON. The Liberal candidate for Avon, Mr, G. W. Russell, addressed the electors' of New Brighton in the Pier Hall on Tuesday night. In the absence of the Mayor, Mr J. Gamble, Cr. F. Ward presided over a large attendanoe. The candidate's address was on the lines of his Llnwood speech, and at the conclusion he was accorded a vote of thanks. The meeting concluded with the singing of the National Anthem. Mr Russell playing the accompaniment on the piano. KAIAPOL About 60 of the Hon. D. Buddo's Rangiora friends and supportprs responded to an invitation to meet him at the Templar Hall last evening, to aes st him in organising for the election. Mr F. Horrell was elected as chajjman. Those present formed themselves into a committee, with power to add to their number, Mr H. Boyd being ejected chairman. On Monday evening a meeting of Mr Buddo's supporters*was he!d at Woodend and a committer formed, with Mr R. Borland as chairman. Mr R. D. Martin addressed an openair meeting of electors at the Northcote settlement, Papanui, on Tuesday night, and received a vote of thanks and confidence. Mr R. D. Martin addressed a meeting j of electors in the Town Hall, last evening, and received a hearty vote of thanks and confidence. ASHBURTON, It is' announced that Mr George Wright, after a conference in Wellington with the Leader of the Opposition, has been chosen as the Liberal-Labour candidate for the Ashburton seat, and that arrangements have been made for Mr Wilford to visit Ashburton an£ deliver an address to the electors. TO-NIGHT'S MEETINGS. Rev. J. K. Archer—Rugby street schoolroom. Mr S. Andrew—Sefton Hall. Mr G. W. Forbes—Loburn Norfa School. OTHEB MEETINGS. Mr G. Witty—Oddfellows' Hall, Upper Riccarton, Monday. KAIPABA. (press association- telegram.) DARGAVILLE, November 8. The Hon. J. G. Coates opened his election campaign in his home town Matakohe. The hall was crowded and the Minister was enthusiastically received- He spoke for two hours on the lines of the iVlassey manifesto, and at the conclusion was accorded a hearty vote of thanks and of continued confidence. Mr R. E. Hornblow, the Liberal candidate, completed his tour of the southern portion of this electorate. He was well received. AUCKLAND WEST. (press association telegram.) AUCKLAND, November 8. Mr J. Farrell, Reform candidate for Auckland West, supported Mr Massey's policy in general and- advocated national superannuation and reduction of taxation, particularly in necessities of life, expressing strong sympathy toward the worker. He favoured elimination of the State Control issue in the event of prohibition not bein<j carried, also reform of the liquor trade. A vote of thanks and confidence was carried. Mr M. J. Savaqe, the official Labour candidate for the Auckland West seat, opened his campaign to-night, when he had a crowded audience. He made most of his points by quoting Mr Massey's speecli in the Town Hall at Wellington in 1911, and drawing contrasts. Mr J. Dooley, the ex-Premier of New South Wales, 6poke saying that the opponents of Labour never anywhere fought elections on a straight-out issue, but introduced many side issues. Mr Savage received a practically unanimous vote of thanks and confidence. AUCKLAND CENTRAL. (press association telegram.) AUCKLAND, November 8. Mr W. E. Parry, the Labour candidate for Auckland Central, opened his campaign to-night. He had an enthusiastic reoeption. He claimed that the Labour platform was the only constructive policy, and every vote against the Labour Party was a vote for Mr Massey. He criticised the Government's immigration policy, as being against the workers' interests, and also the Government's borrowing, with the burden of interest. EDEN. (press association telegram.) •AUCKLAND, November 8. Mr F. S. Norton, the Opposition candidate for Eden in his onenin o, speech said the country's finances were in a chaotic state. No man in tho Cabinet was fit to hold that important portfolio. He advocated a semi-rural housing scheme. He said Mr Massey had betrayed the producers over the Imperial purchases of butter, as thev had got less than other countries He received a vote of thanka and confidence.

J Bqsktt.t.

I (press association telegram.)

Mr T ,P> Nove mber 8. t> i;if' La bour candidate for 1D hls ,-°I >eriln S address, said that the socialisation projects of the party could only be achieved gradually, even if the party got into power. Proportional, representation was the only democratic method of voting, and the initiative and referendum meant government by the people. He declared that prices of most commodities in New Zealand were fixed by combines, in whose interests the Maesev Government legislated. A rote of'thanks was accorded the candidate. GREY LYNN. (press association telegram.) AUCKLAND, November 8. Mr W. J. Holdsworth, Independent Progressive candidate for Grey Lynn, opened his campaign last night. He said he was a non-believer in party, but on a no-confidenoe motion he would support Mr Massey. He advocated a constructive policy, the first plank cf which was better understanding i )t v t'ween capital and labour, establishing sick benefit funds, insurance against unemplovment and old age. and giving an annual vacation on full pay. He favoured reforms and more vigorous expenditure on education, a more vigorous land policy and deflating land values. A vote of thanks was passed. FRANKLIN. (press association telegram.) AUCKLAND, November 8. Mr J. Rea, Liberal candidate for Franklin, spoke at Papakura last night. He declared that Mr Massey at last election obtained a majority by frightening the electors with the socalled danger of the three party system, and that Mr Massey ; if elected, would forget all his election pledges. He criticised the Government administration. A vote of thanks and confidence was passed. ROTORUA. (press association telegram.) ROTORUA, November 8. Mr W. H. Wackrow being unable to contest the Rotorua seat for business reasons, Mr C. A. Clinkard has been selected as the Liberal-Labour candidate and accepted by the party. GISBORNE. (PRESS ASSOCIATION TiLEGRAM.) GISCBORNE, November 8. Mr W. D. Lysnar addressed a large meeting to-night. He gave a summary of his work during the past three years. The meeting was lively at times owing to the Labour element. Mr Lysnar said he had changed from a Liberal to an Independent Reformer because the district,had not been getting proper aid. He considered that Mr Massey was doing splendid service for the Domnion. The candidate was accorded a vote of thanks. HAWKE'S BAY. (PRESS ASSOCIATION TELEGRAM.) NAPIER, November 7. Mr C. H. Chapman, official Labour candidate for the _ Hawke's Bay seat, opened his campaign at Hastings tonight, receiving a vote of tlvanks and confidence. His address was on the lines of those of other Labour candidates. WANGANUI. (press association telegram.) WANGANUI, November 7. Mr W. A. Veitch, the sitting member, opened his campaign last night, and announced himself as a supporter of the Liberal-Labour Party. He received a vote of thanks. WELLINGTON SOUTH. (PRESS ASSOCIATION TELECkAM.) WELLINGTON, November 8. Mr George Mitchell, M.P. for Wellington South, addressed a large meeting jo-night. He spoke as an Independent. He said he was tied to no party, and would support what was in the best interests of trie Dominion. He spoke of the danger of Socialism from extreme Labour, and the inconsistency of Mr Massey. A vote of thanks and confidence was carried. WELLINGTON CENTRAL. (PRESS ASSOCIATION TELEGRAMS WELLINGTON, November 8. Mr H. D. Bennett, Independent working candidate for Wellington Central, said he could not be a partv man. WELLINGTON EAST. (PRESS ASSOCIATION TELEGRAM.) WELLINGTON, November 8. Mrs Annie McVicar, the Independent Reform candidate for Wellington East, made her initial bow to the electors to-night. She is the first woman to seek the suffrages of Wellington electors for a seat in Parliament. She dealt principally with social questions. She said she would vote for the Government on a no-confidence motion, but otherwise she would be Independent. Mrs McVicar received a vote of thanks and confidence. WELLINGTON NOBTH. (press association telegram.) WELLINGTON, November 8. Sir John Luke, the Reform candidate for Wellington North, opened his campaign in the Sydney street Hall last night, Dr. Newman, M.P., presiding. There was a large attendance. Sir John Luke declared himself a strong supporter of the Massey Government, and maintained that any change during the critical reconstruction period would be to the disadvantage of the country. The Government, he claimed, had on the whole done remarkably well during particularly trying times, and should be retained in power to complete their reconstruction work and carry out their plans for rehabilitating the finances of the country and restoring trade and industry to normal prosperity. Referring to war pensions and soldier settlement difficulties, he expressed confidence that the Government would do the right thing by our soldiers. A -Y°" n g> the candidate for Wellington North in the Liberal-Labour interest, addressed the electors to-nio-ht He said he was strongly opposed to'the Reform Party, who had set up the Liberal and oxtreme Labour bogey. The Liberal Party would never ally itself with the extreme Labour P.nrty, whose policy was not in the interests' of the country or the workers. Mrs T M Wilford presided. A vote of thanks and confidence was carried. NELSON. (press association telegram.) NELSON, November 8 Mr H. Atmore, M.P., delivered' a political address before a crowded meeting in the Theatre Royal last evening He said he was standing as a Liberal-

i Labour candidate. This did not men I that he was tied to a party boss, but I that he could look on the whole of life I from the angle of the Liberal-Labour _ i standpoint. He was pledged to the ' principles enunciated "by Grey, BaJ- ' lance, Sedion and Ward. The L«beral- * j Labour Party did not need a certificate * of loyalty from the iMme Minister, ■ j who was prostituting Imperialism for party purposes. Mr Atmore said lie * I would vote for proportional repreenta- " j tion, but would ally himself with no : party. A vote of confidence was carr ried with cheers. I s WAIRAU. (press association telegram.) BLENHEIM, November 8. Mr W. J. Gii-ling, the official Reform candidate for Wairau, addressed tho electors la-st night, and was well - received. He opened with a compari- > son of the various political parties. Tho only difference between the Liberal and ( the Reform manifestoes was the State i Bank proposal and proportional repref sentatioii advocated by Mr Wilford. - He condemned the extreme Labour ; platform as merely class legislation, not t practical politics. He criticised the ; financial methods of the Government, > particularly their expenditure on the * Railways and the Post and Telegraph - Departments. He eulogised the Go- . vernment's education legislation, their care of the soldiers, and their care of the workers. The candidate expressed his determination, if elected, to work for a ferry service across tho Strait from Picton, and the completion of the South Island Main Trunk line. He stated that although he was a Reform candidate he reserved the right of freer dom of speech and vote on any quest tion, but he would, on a no-confidence t motion, vote to keep the Massey Go--7 vernmcnt in power. , BULLER. (press association telegram.) WESTPORT, November 8. Mr H. E. HulLtnd, chairman of the Parliamentary. Labour Party, addressed a large gathering in Westpoit tonight. lio was accorded a good hearts* punctuated by frequent applause. His address was mainly on the nnes of his speeches delivered in other centres 0 in justification of the Parliamentary 8 Labour Party's actions, and in elaboration of the party's policy a 6 set out in II its maniiesto. He also refuted' allegations of dis.oyalty and the charge that the Labour Party stood for insurrectionary action. Mr Holland was accorded a vote of thanks and confidence, with cheers. DUNEDIN WEST. (press association telegram.) DUNEDIN, November 8. Mr 0. M. Moss, the Labour candidate for Dunedin West, in which electorate he is opposing the Hon. W. Downie Stewart, opened his campaign last night. He criticised the administration of the present Government and f set out to show reforms that would be ! undertaken by the Labour Party if j 15 were returned to power. Also the methods it would adopt to raise the necessary funds for carrying out its programme. It was not a portion of the Labour Party's platform to con- 1 fiscate wealth. He dealt at some length j with the Labour Party's platform, em- j " phasising in particular that the party 1 1 would repeal both the present Military - Service Act and the Defence Act. He: '■ received a vote of thanks and con- - fidence. DUNEDIN CENTRAL. (press association telegram.) DUNEDIN, November 8. Mr W. S. Maslin, the Progressive' Liberal candidate for Dunedin Central, ! , addressed a meeting at South Dunectin J to-night. He referred at length to the! liberal measures of the Seddon-Ward j days, which had laid the foundation of the country's prosperity in the after years. He criticised the action of the E resent Government in respect to the regislative Council, and said as that body sat for very little time during the session, it might well be eliminated. He favoured the exemption from taxation, of capital invested in industry . until that industry -was paying 5 or O I I plr cent. If the Liberal Party obtain- j ! ed a majority he would support it, but , if the Liberal Party had to depend on Labour, he would not vote to oust the present Ministry- The candidate was accorded a vote of thanks.

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Bibliographic details

THE ELECTION CAMPAIGN., Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 17607, 9 November 1922

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5,559

THE ELECTION CAMPAIGN. Press, Volume LVIII, Issue 17607, 9 November 1922

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