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MR J. COLVIN, M.P., KILLED.

KNOCKED DOWN BY TRAM-CAR IN WELLINGTON.

(press association telegram.) WELLINGTON, October 29. Mr James Colvin, M.P. for Buller, was knocked down by a tram-car shortly ::fter 10 o'clock to-night, and killed. He attempted to crcss t-lie. line at Featherston street ahead of nn .approaching tram-car, but was struck and thrown clear of the lino. Doctors wera summoned and pronounced life to be extinct. From the appearance of tho body, death is believed to have resulted from concussion.

Sir Joseph "Ward, Mr G. Witty, and Mr R. McrOallum, M.P.'s, who were personal frieiids of 31 r Colvin, arranged for the removal of the body to a mortuary chapel.

THE ANNOUNCEMENT IN THE HOUSE. 3 (special to "the rnisss.") ; WELLINGTON, October 29. . The news of the death of Mr Colvin f camo to the House of Representatives , with startling suddenness. The debate • on the Land Bill was in progress, with ' tho Hon.. Mr Buddo speaking. The , House was quiet, and apparently rei signed to a. long sitting. The attendance was small, and tho Opposition benches were thinly filled. Just at twenty minutes to eleven Sir Joseph i Ward came in, followed by a number of other members, all appoaring deeply moved. Sir Joseph Ward crossed tho House, and gavo the sad news to the Prime Minister. Mr Massey immediately rose to his foet, and speaking with considerable emotion, said: —"1 liavo just heard a very sad and terrible pieco of news. Mr Colvin, the member for Buller, the sonior member, and one of the most highly-respected members of the House, was killed by a tramcar in Wellington to-night. Ido not know any particulars. I have just been told wliat I now tell you. In these circumstances there is only one thing to do, and that is to adjourn the House, even if it should mean delaying tho end of the session." The motion for the adjournment was passed in perfect silence, and tha House adjourned at once; Members from all parts of the House | immediately crowded around Sir Joseph Ward, and those who had entered the Chamber with him, anxious to know how the accident had occurred. Beyond the fact that only about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour had elapsed since Mr Colvin left the Parliamentary Buildings, no one knew anything, save that he had met his death in the street. Mr Colvin was a most kindly soul, and during his twenty years' career in Parliament it may safely be said that lie made troops of friends and no enemies. He was familiarly referred to in the precincts of Parliament as "Uncle" Colvin, though how lie came to be called "Uncle" is not known to tho new generation of politicians. It was Mr Wilford. who as a young man camo into the House in the same year as Mr Colvin, who was responsible for tho nick-name. He saw Mr Colvin, and introduced himself as Mr Wilford, remarking to the new member for Buller, "I don't know who you are, but you're very like mv uncle Arthur, and I'm going to call von uncle." Mr Colvin had been in failing health of late, and week bv week he .seemed to be getting moro frail. He was in the House this evening, and after listening for a while to the debate on the Land Bill, he remarked to a member sitting near him. "I don't think I'll stay for this division; I'm going homo." [The late Mr Colvin was first returned for Buller by a majority of 544 votes over Mr P. J. O'Regan in 1899, and at the following election he T>olled 3370 votes as against 789 bv the Rev. F. W. Isrtt, who stood for the seat in order to ensure the talcing of a local ontion poll. Mr Colv.in has represented Buller c°ntinuously ever since. Ho -was born in County Donegal. Ireland, in 1844, and was .educated there. Vv hen 17 years c.f age he went to Australia, landing at Melbourne, and having successfully followed goldmining for some time at Creswick Creek nnd at DnyleefoTd, he was attracted an 18R2 to New Zealand by the Otago goldfields. He went to_ tho Dunstan, and later to the Wakat-ipu. and afterwards removed to Invercargill. A year Inter he went to the Waknmnrinn and startedi a store. Later, Mr Colvin went to Hokitika Jind nr>ened a store at Waimia. afterwards selling that business and starting in the Grey Valley. In 18R7, when the gold discovery at the Buller ' caused anotbnr stir amongst miners, he < went to Addison's Flat, nnd in 1872 entered into business at Westport. In < 1885 he was elected to the B/uller County Council and served on it for six years, nnd in 1890 he was. chairman of tho Westport Harbour Board. He held a seot- on the Nelson Education Board in 1804. Mr C"lvin was an enthusiastic - Oddfellow, and was connected with the • Westport Lodge, in which he had long ' been through all the degrees.] j

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19191030.2.43

Bibliographic details

MR J. COLVIN, M.P., KILLED., Press, Volume LV, Issue 16667, 30 October 1919

Word Count
833

MR J. COLVIN, M.P., KILLED. Press, Volume LV, Issue 16667, 30 October 1919

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