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PEACE CONFERENCE.

REPRESENTATION OF SMALL

NATIONS

(Br Cable.—Pres« Association.—Copyright.) and N.Z. Cable Association.) 1 NEW YORK, January 14. , The Paris correspondent of the United! . Press states that a movement is believed! , to be under way to reduce the reprcsen- , tation of the smaller nations, in order to make the Peace Congress less unwieldy. It is expected that the vari- j ous Powers will be represented according to the importance of the part tney played in the war. The United States, Japan. France, Italy, and Britain will have five members each, and other nations between one and three members. PARIS, January 14. It has been decided that Belgium and Serbia shall each have two delegates, and Brazil three delegates at the Peace Conference. RUSSIA'S POSITION'. PARIS, January 14. Russia's position at the Peace Conference has not yet been settled. THE DOMINIONS' VOICE. (United Service.) (Received January 17th, 7.30 p.m.) LONDON, January 10. Mr Keith Murdoch, writing from Paris, says it appears that President) Wilson strongly opposes the Dominions appearing as small nations, and is forcing considerable opposition. M. Clemenceau cordially supports the British view. Mr Lloyd George, in an emphatic speech, contrasted the Dominions' long services and heavy losses with those of certain other Powers. (Australian and N.Z. Cable Association.) (Received January 17th, 11.20 p.m.) NEW YORK, January 15. The Omsk Government will have a Russian representative. This is considered tantamount to the recognition of the All-Russian Government. RELATIONS WITH THE PRESS. (Australian and N.Z. Cable Association.) (Received January 17th, 7.20 p.m.) PARIS, January 16. President Wilson and the Prime Minisiers and Foreign Ministers of the Allies discussed the relations of tho Conference and th<? Press, and referred the matter to a meeting of the Press and tho Allied and associated Governments for an interchange of views concerning future methods. It also decided that various Governments should mutually exchange the latest information regarding Russia, with a view to ai joint examination of the question. PROTEST AGAINST SECRECY. (Received January 17th, 7.30 p.m.) PARIS, January 16. Mr A. J. Fraser writes that the decision merely to issue an official communique daily and maintain absolute secrecy, placing an embargo on delegates against discussing the proceedings of tho Conference with the Press, occasioned a vigorous protest to Mr Lloyd George from the Empire's Press representatives. It has been pointed out that secrecy strikes a blow at President Wilson's first point, that covenants should be openly arrived at; also, with a conference of 62 delegates representing 28 separate nations, the prevention of leakage is difficult, especially when some delegates, disgruntled by defeat, seek to gain the public ear. This will inevitably lead to biased and inaccurate information escaping. ' (Received January 17th. 8.10 n.m.) PARIS, January 16. The Peace Conference delegates have cabled that probably the Peace. Conference will not be secret. NO CENSORSHIP. (Australian and N.Z. Cable Association.) (Router's Telegrams.) (Received January 17th, 9.20 p.m.) , LONDON, January 15. The Press Bureau states that the Foreign Offico announces that there will be no censorship on British correspondents' messages from Paris during the Peace Conference. LEAGUE OF NATIONS. LATE MR ROOSEVELT'S VIEWS. (Australian and N. 2. Cable Association.) (Received January 17th. 8.10 p.m.) NEW YORK, January 16. The late Mr Roosevelt's last article has been published. It says: "We all desire a League of Nations, only we , wish to be sure it will help, not hinder, tho cause of world peace and justice. Nobody knows what President Wilson means by his fourteen points. All the talk of adopting them as the basis of . peace or tho League is nonsense. Would I it not be wise to begin by forming a • leaguo composed of the Allies, who have 1 fought in the great war together? Let ' us see that real justice is done to these Allies at the peace table."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19190118.2.61

Bibliographic details

Press, Press, Volume LV, Issue 16424, 18 January 1919

Word Count
632

PEACE CONFERENCE. Press, Volume LV, Issue 16424, 18 January 1919

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