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OBITUARY.

MR M. J. DIXON.

At the tsroukeauurst ti&pital at Hauyora, yebieiuay mormug, there pas&ea away ALr Alanuaaaao Joun a son of one oi Canterbury's pioneers, aud himself one ot tne best Known and moat respected settlors in the West kyroton diotnct. 'lhe late Mr Dixon was tue eluest son of _ Air lUariuauuke Dixon, lormeriy of iiyieweil, near Ivaiapoi. lie was born in Id&Jt, and received hiß education at Curifat's College. His fatnor took up a largp tr;ict ot land along tue banks of tne W aimakariri varying frotn ueavy undraineu swamps to ugut manuka * flats. On ieaviug BCuool tne il. J. Dixon joined his father in the management ot iiis estato or 48,000 acres, and in 1893 he carried out, under the direction of his father, an ambitious irrigation scueine, the first to be tried in canter but y. Water was obtained from tiie Waimakariri and brougnt down over the lignt lands in large channels. Altogether a block of about 1301) acres in extent was experimentally irrigated and sown, and the results, on tne whole, were satisfactory, tnough the scheme was not gone on with. On the death of his iatner, in 1895, Mr M. J. Dixon succeeded to the full management of the estate, working in conjunction with his brotiier, Mr It. 0. Dixon. About 1910, Mr Dixon put into practice a scheme for the rapid clearing of the large area of manuka iiats, using huge Hanged rollers of his owij design, drawn by traction ongines. These rolled and crushed the manuka flat, and the flanges broke the scrub up into short lengths, which were much more easily burned than the standing scrub, and cleared at a cheaper rate than by hand slashing, which was impracticable. Mr Dixon was a'believer in settlement, and he assisted a good many of his mea to take up blocks of his land on advantageous terms, and now there are several prosperous farmers on the Waimakariri flats, which formerly were sheep-walks. Mr Dixon also acquirod considerable property in the North Island, and was largely interested in tne co-operative freezing works' business. Mr Dixon, some years ago, was an enthusiastic mountain climber, and was one of the three founders of the New Zealand Alpino Club. IVom 18S5 to 1890 ho used to spend his annual holidays in climbing and exploring the Southern Alps, and on one occasion ascended to about 100 ft of the summit of Moujit Cook. In 1890 he took an octire part in exploring the region around Mount Cook and tiie Tasman Glacier. Leaving Mount Cook, in company with Mr G. Manncring, lie paddled his canoe down the Tasman river and down Pukaki Lake and river to the Waitaki river. Like his father, Mr Dixon took a keen interest in the Waimakariri-Ashley water supply system, and was for many years a member of the Water Supply j Hoard, being for most of the time I chairman, an office he held at the time of his death. Ho took a great interest in public affairs, and his death will be regretted by a large circle of friends, made in public and private life. Mr Dixon was married m 1897 to Miss Mabol Courage, of Seadown, Amberley

MR MICHAEL FRAER. Mr Michael Fraer, who died at Kaiapoi on Tuesday, was bora at Lauuceston (Tasmania) 74 years ngo. Ho was Mayor of Cromwell on several occasions. Later ho had a draper's shop in Dunedin. He retired from that business somo years ago, and took up the duties of coilector for the Dunedin Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, a position that he held until quite recently, when he made up his mind to enjoy his leisure at Kaiapoi. Mr Fraer held a seat on the tirst Education Board of Otago, selected in 1878. In later years Mr Fraer became chairman of tho Board. fee was known in recent years as an enthusiastic, office-bearer in tho Dunedin School Committees' Association. Mrs Fraer survives her husband, and the members of the family are:—Mr William Fraer (Dunedin) Mrs F. Roach, and four other daughters, the Rev. C. Fraer (of Philhpstown), Mr Harry Fraer, on the staff of Messrs Beath and Co. (Christchurch), Mr Frank Fraer (of Foilding, now in camp), Mr Hugh Fraer, and Mr Arthur Fraer (on activo service at tho front), and Mr Albert Fraer (in the Official Assignee's office at Auckland).

MR H. SMITH

An old Little ltiver resident passed away recently in tlie person -of Mr Henry Smitn, who was in his seventieth year. Mr Smith arrived in New Zealand in the ship City of Auckland, in September, 1872. Ho landed in Auckland, and stayed there two months. He then came t-o Banks Peninsula; and worked about five years for the late Mr E. C. Latter. After leaving Mr Latter ho bought land in tho Terawern Vailey, and set to work to clear it and make a home for his family and himself. TJp to ten years ago he led an active life. He thon retired from his iarm and settled in the Little River township for about six years. _He then left Little River and settled in Chrisrtchurch, where he remained up to the time of his death. Mr Smith was a great friend of the Maoris, who feel his loss very keenly. Ho was also much interested in football, and was victvpresident of the Star Club lor several seasons. His widow,' three sons, and three daughters, survive him.

MR SAMUEL ALPE,

(PRESS ASSOCIATION TELECKAiI.)

WELLINGTON, July'3l., Mr Samuol Alpe, a retired Civil servant, died suddenly to-day, aged 83 years. Ho wa3 in his usual health at 4.30, and a few minutes later was found lying against a wall dead. The cause of death was heart disease. In his earlier days Mr AJpe \ras a keen cricketer and a fine batsman, of the steady order. His name is* well remembered on the fields both of Canterbury and Wellington. In tho match at Chnstchurch against Lillywliite's team, in 1878, Mr Alpo won the prize for tho best fieldsman.

[Tho late Sir Alpo was a Crimean and Maori war veteran, baring seen service in both those campaigns. He came to New Zealand over sixty years ago, from Lincolnshire. He was engaged for many years in storekeeping, being at various times in business in Auckland, Thames, and Christchurch. In this city ho was well-known as proprietor of the Co-operative Stores in Lower High streot, about forty years ago. Subsequently he joined the Stores Department <}f the railways, and after service in that capacity he retired on superannuation. Two sons and a daughter reside in Christchurch, and other members of the family are in tho North Island.]

A Press Association telegram records the death of Mr Alexander Hatrifk, one of Wanganui's most progressive merchants, at the age of 60. The deceased was well known in Dominion commercial circles, but was probably bast known in connexion with opening up and advertising the Wanganui river as a tourist route. He was Mayor of Wanganui for many years.

Ono of Southland's earliest settlers, Mr William Calder, sen., who passed away at Heddonyßush a few days ago, in his eighty-second year, had much to do with tho district's development and progress. Born in 1837, he, like many other young men, was attracted to the colonies, and landed in Dunedin with his brother Alexander, in tho Alpine, in 1859. They purchasod a team, and were the first teamsters to go to Gabriel's Gully. After the rush he wont to Southland and took up land at Thornbnry, and did a' considerable amount of carting from Riverton to tho Lakes, and got as much as £100 per t ton. He subsequently settled at Heddon Bush.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Press, Volume LIV, Issue 16279, 1 August 1918

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1,281

OBITUARY. Press, Volume LIV, Issue 16279, 1 August 1918

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