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WITH THE ALL BLACKS

FROM PAPEETE TO SAN FRANCISCO. , A SPLENDID~RECEPTK>N. THE FIRST THREE GAMES. <Bf OUR SPOT-- COaRESPOja>-!OP.> - SAN FRANCISCO, October 14. We arrived at Papeete wharf at a few minutes past three o'clock on Friday, 19th September,- and in a very short time we were all on shore, bent on seeing all we could of the quaint port. Scon after arrival the manager was met by a French gentleman, Mr Bies, a great Rugby enthusiast, who a few years ago represented France. He was extremely anxious for the team to give an exhibition game, and it was toon arranged for 5.30 p.m. the same evening, that, hour being chosen as the business places all close at 5 o'clock, and a good attendance would thus be ensured.

The news that a game was to be played was quickly circulated and readily responded to, for wheu wo arrived at the ground we found an assemblage or at least 700 people, coloured and white, eagerly awaiting our appearance. Teams of eleven a side were chosen, E. Roberts being the only member of the team who did not play. .The manager took the whistle. The ground was very small, and extremely rough, and the players bad strict instructions to ''go easy" and to refrain from knocking one anotner about. The audience was most enthusiastic throughout. Two short, spells of about 15 minutes each were played the Blacks beating the colours by a small margin. The Governor of Papeete was present, and expressed his pleasure at witnessing the game. AT SAN FRANCISCO. Though the voyage had been a most pleasant one the anticipation of landing in California was delightful, and the boys started packing up on Wednesday, and there were no sluggards on the morning of the _nd October. The selection committee met-

the previous evening and selected the following team for the opening game on the 4th inst. which was against the Olympic Club of San Francisco, via.*— Backs, Cuthili, Lynch. Mitcliinson, McGregor, R. Robert*., Gray, Taylor; forwards (wing), A. McDonald (capt.), Sollars, Williams, Atkinson, Downing, Wylie, Bruce, Dewar, Emergencies, Mackenzie, and Graham.

All hands were on deck early eager to catch a first view of the Golden, •Gate and San Francisco Bay. We were anchored in tho stream by 9 a.m., but oar impatience to get on shore had to be restrained until such timo as tho various officials, Health, Immigration, etc., were satisfied on the numerous points of information required by their respective departments. » This ordeal got through we wero visited by members of the entertainment committee of the Californian Rußbv Union, and representatives of the Governor of the State, and the Mayor of San Francisco. The party also included the British Consul, Mr Carnegie Ross. Speeches of welcome were made by' several of the above officials and "responded to by our manager. law ceremony concluded we wero at once attacked by an army of reporters and photographers, who were not to be denied, and we -were questioned and cross-questioned withour mercy. It wax after eleven o'clock, before we reached the wharf where we found an immense concourse of people awaiting our landing. And what a reception we got I Near the water edge wa« posted the University of California Cadet Band, while a short distance away was the Band from Stanford, both playing lively and inspiriting music, mostly ragtime, and joining forces, just a* the Willochra wae being tied up, in playing "I Love California." Conspicuous among tho members of tho reception Committee on the wharf was "Doc" Burbank, well and popularly known throughout New Zealand as the manager of tho American Universities team which toured the Dominion in 1910. Tho "Doc." was looking as merry and bright as ever, and was soon amongst us all renewing his acquaintance with many of us and being introduced to the remainder. During tho operation of making the vessel fast we were greeted with College yells and cries by the big crowd of students from the University, interspersed with war cries by our fellows. Tho College cries were a revelation! We had heard them given in Now Zealand by the visiting Rugger players, and thought them great, but, given by some hundreds of lusty graduates, they were quite a different" proposition. One in particular, the "Oiski wow wow" is certainly a fearful and wonderful cryUnder the guidance of our hosts we embarked on the motor-caTS. We were received with more cheers and more yelk, which continued after the procession bad moved off. Led by a troop or mounted police and the united bands, wo made a detonr of the principal streets of the city, the line of route being thronged, finally disembarking at the Olympic Club. In the magnificent gymnasium of the club the formal reception was held, after tho team had received a hearty welcome to the club by the president, Mr'Wrri. F. Humphrey. After speeches by Senator French' (representing Governor Johnson), the British Consul (Mr Carnegie Ross) and other prominent citi_ens, our manager responded on our behalf, returning thanks for our groat reception, and expressing our high appreciation of tho warm welcome accorded us. The ceremony over, we were entertained at lunch at the club by the Olympians, after which we were shown over th© premises. THE FIRST. MATCH. On Saturday last (4th inst.) we played our first match, meeting the Olympic Club on the' St. Ignatius field. And what a ground it is! And what a misnomer to call H a field! Shades of Lancaster Park, Carisbrook, or any other foot-ball ground in New

Zealand! It is what is called hero a "dirt field," but patch" would be a more descriptive title. A ploughed and harrowed patch, fairly well sprinkled with bits of rock and scoria, and well-watered to keep, the dust down a little —what would players in New Zealand think if they had to play regularly on -such grounds, as the fellows here have to do? There is only ono turfed ground in San Francisco available for football, and that is in tho Golden Gate Park, which is a public ground, where no char-go can bo made for admission. Tho gamo against the Olympics, was played in two spells of thirty minutes each, and quite long enough too, under the conditions, for after fifteen minutes' play the dust was terrible. For the first quarter our players were all at sea, and at the end of . the first spell the score was only 6 to 0 in qux favour* Williams and Lynch scoring tries. Mitchinson was injured in this, spell, and did not go on in tho second half, Roberts taking his place at centre three-quarter, while MeKenzie filled the vacancy in tlio five-eighth line. The play improved all round in tho second hau, our boys getting more used to the dirt ground. Tries were scored by Graham, Roberts, and Wylie, Cuthili adding the major points to tho last two tries. Roberts's try was tho outcome of a very fine feinting run, which completely nonplussed the locals, and gained him an ovation by the onlookers, of whom there wero about 1800 present. Cuthili and Lynch also showed up prominently in the back division, but the dust rising from the scrum affected the play of Taylor. Tho forwards all went well, Downing, WyUo,and Sellara doing, exceptionally good work. Th**. game resulted in a win for us hy 19 points, to nil. Wo were greatly amused at the elaborate arrangements for reviving the local players during the game. The trainer hovered about the field of play carrying a largo bag containing lint bandages, etc., while on each side of tho ground stood two youths with a bucket of water and a huge sponge; and they had no lack of occupation, for every few minutes a player would demand their attention with very little reason, so far as we could see. Stoppages wero very frequent, and the bandaging and sponging, etc., wero ridiculously overdone. THE SECOND MATCH. On the Monday wo wont across tho bay to Berkeley as tho guests of the University of California. On Wednesday our team met the University "team, the gamo being played dirt field, but one in, better condition than that on whioh the first match was played. Our team was as follows.: —Backs: Stohr, Cuthili, It. Roberts, Lynch.,MeKenaio, Gray, and Taylor; forwards: Dewar, Cain, Bruce, Wylie, Downing, Sellars, McDonald, and Murray (wing). The referee was Mr L. S. Rca'ding, who also carried tup whistle in our first game. In tins match, which was witnessed by over 5000 people, our team showed improved form and, considering tho heavy ground, tho play was fast and open.. The forwards easily hold their opponents, und showed good combination. The play was almost entirely confined to the 'Varsity quarters tho determined loose rushes of the forwards combined with tho dashing runs and strong kicking by the backs completely nonplussing tho local team, R. Roberts was tho star performer on the day, and ho was ably backed by Cuthili, McKenzio, and Gray. -tolvr registered tho first score by a, boaUtitu' goal kicked from half-way. Wylie,. SelJars, and Downing were prominent Among tho forwards, but all played well. Tries wore scored by Cuthili <•?), Rhodes (2), McKenzie, McDonald, Dewar, and Downing, Cuthili converting two of tho tries whilo Stohr placed a penalty goal. The final result, was— New Zealand 31 points, Oniversity ot California 0.

THE BARBARIANS. On, the following Saturday wo played the Barbarians on the tit. Ignatius Ground, which -was in rather better condition than on the previous baturday. Our team lined up us follows:— Backs, Stohr, Lynch, Cuthili, Loveridge, McKousdc, Gray, and Taylor; forwards, Dewar, Kane, Atkinson, Downing, Graham, Douglas, McDonald, and Murray (wing). In this gamo our players put up a rather ragged performance, neither forwards nor hacks doing thornsolves justice. Tho "Barbs" played up very strongly in the second half, aria wero within an ace of scoring on one occasion, chiofly through the agency of Do La Maro, an ox-member of the Merivalo Olub in Christohurch. A somewhat disappointing game onding in'ft victory for the All-Blacks by .80 pointo to nil.

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Bibliographic details

WITH THE ALL BLACKS, Press, Volume XLIX, Issue 14818, 8 November 1913

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1,683

WITH THE ALL BLACKS Press, Volume XLIX, Issue 14818, 8 November 1913

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