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NEWS OF THE DAY.

A petition in bankruptcy has boon filed by Ernest Charles Kmpson, of Christoliurch, music teacher. The first meeting of creditors will be held on January 6th, at 2.30 p.m. We have received from the children of the Charing Cross School (per Mr A. Liddy) a donation of 5s towards tho fund in aid of tho Huntly boy who lost both of his hands in a railway accident a fow months ago. The Railway Department notify that the platfo-rns at Christcburch station will bo closed from 7.15 a.m. to 8.15 a.m. on December 21st, 23rd, 24th, and January 2nd. and only holders of journey or admission tickets will be admitted. Sonio idea of tho impetus which tho Military aad Naval Tournament, to bo held hero on December 26th and 27th, l-.'i.s invert to defonco matters may bo pi ho red from tho f.nnouncement that in Rangiora alono forty Senior Cadets are now in keen competition us to which of them shall have the honour to represent their companies. It is tho snir.e in all the smaller towns, but in tho city itself they are perhaps a little less excited. Tho teams already have been selected and they are in hard tnvinins. At four o'clock vestorday afternoon (says Wednesday's "Now Zealand Times"), a railway train and an electric tramcar ran along Jervois Quay, on parallel lines. Tho train ;vas bound from To Aro station for the W'airarapa. It consisted of one engine, seven or eight carriages, and two luggage vans. The tramcar was an ordinary singledecker of tho side-entrance type. There were many more passengers in tho tramear than there were in the train. Can anj-one say ifc was really worth while running that train? _ f Mr G L-? <^ ers ?, n >' , adva nce agent for Messrs AVirth Brothers' Circus, pays a high tribute to the progress made lately by the City of Chnstchurch. Since Monday fast ho has struggled hard to find a site near to the centre of the city on which his show might play. .Ali tho old stands had been built upon, am i tju-ro remained not a sin-Je section of sufficient size. An attempt was made to get the King Edward Barracks but it was unsuccessful As ahnal resource Lancaster Park was obtained. Tho business has its moral, tor if ever Lancaster Park were lost to the people, it appears there is no place left at which a circus could set up its tents. The infant children of the Addington School spent a joyous time yesterday morning, when Father Christmas paid a visit to their school. Th e king of all fairies, dressed in his royal robes arrived by motor-car, and was welcomed at the gato by the children. Aftervbeing snap-shotted amongst his lovai subjects an adjournment was made to the mam room, where a monster Christmas treo, all aflame with electric sparkles, was an' object of keen delight Here every child received a toy Three cheers were called for Father Christmas Miss Sbirtchffe and staff, and the children dispersed for five weeks' holiday. The children sent a larce toy dog Rover to Clyde RagZ* gj bttle boy who so unfortunately lost his hands at Huntly. Thirty-one infante received attendance certificates.

From Halcombo comes tho story of an absent-minded young man whowas about to get married, nnd ordered his wedding breakfast from a local «onfectioner. The breakfast—an elaborate one^— was ready in time, but the fuests did not put in an appearance, 'he young man had mistaken the date and ordered the spread a week too soon.

Tho Wellington Land Board had before it yesterday the first application for postponement of payment of rent, and it decided to recommend tbo Minister to grant tho application. This was under Section 13 of the new \ct which provides for such relief subject to the approval of the Minister, when rent cannot bo paid when due, through "natural disaster or other sufficient cause.

-'Sincere greetings from tho Canadian Cadots, is tho inessago on a handsome post-card sent by Captain 11. X. Davy, otficer commanding tho Cadets, to "Tho Press." The card, which was posted at Honolulu, bears tho picture of s» cadet with a flag, and tho wording states that "the members of the Canadian Cadet Corps extend Christmas and New Year greeting to their many friends beneath tho Southern Cross."

Mr G. W. Russell, M.P.. has received tho following reply from the Postmaster-General regarding tho Rawhiti Domain and the wireless station:—"ln referenco to your letter of the oth ultimo, forwarding one from tho hon. secretary, Kawhiti Domain Board, asking that tho portion of tho New Brighton Domain given up for the purpose of a wireless station, if not required for that purpose, be Sianded back to the Board, I havo tho honour to inform you that it is being arranged to re-transfer tho land to the Board.-— (Signed) R. Heaton Rhodes.' ,

The various activities of the Young Women's Christian Association are closing for tho year, to resume work apain in February. Tho business girl's club held a most onjovab'lo closing evening, at which Mrs J. Newell concluded her reading of "Tho Taming of the Shrew." Tho concluding function of tho .rear will be the Christmas party to which over 70 invitations ha\e been sent out. To-night there will be a closing membership- evening in tho V.M.C.A. Hall, at which specimens of the work done during the year will be shown. This meeting will be open to the public.

On the Feruside road yesterday, where the railway trains run alongside the highway, a family in a cart were seen to bo in trouble through the horse shying. A female and a youngster were seen to bo grabbing tho reins from the hand of tho driver, and for a minute it looked as if an upset iuto the further side ditch -was inevitable. The train having shot past, tho steed became quiet and was induced to go on its way. A littlo further on tho train had almost to pull up as a farmer who owned tho adjacent property considered there was no necessity to wait, and so crossed the line within a short distance of tho Hearing train.

The turbine steamer Maori was announced to make nn excursion trip from Lyttelton to Akaroa on Boxing I>ay, but the Union Company Has decided to send their fine Island steamer Navua, 3000 tons, instead. It was extremely doubtful whether it would be possible to berth tho Maori at Akaroa on that day, and as tho time lost in tendering passengers to and from tho wharf considerably shortens the time ashore, it was decided to select the Navua which will have no difficulty in getting alongside the wharf, and which will arrive at Akaroa at 1 p.m., and will remain there till 6 p.m., thus giving excursionists a good spell on shore.

Mr G. "W. Russell, M.P., has received tho following letter from tho Postmaster-General on the subject of a branch post office at South Now Brighton:—'"ln reference your letter of tho 21st ultimo, forvr-arding, a petition from Messrs W. H. Turvey and others for the opening of a post office and a telephone bureau at South Brighton, I have the honour to inform you that Mr Gale's store, in which it is proposed that the post office be situated, is only eight minutes' walk from tho office at New Brighton. Correspondence is delivered in the district twice a day, and the business that would be done at an office at South Brighton would be trifling. In the circumstances I regret that the opening of a post office is not warranted. The application for the opening of a telephone bureau is being dealt with separately.—(Signed) R. Heaton

For the second time within a month representatives of the Passive Resisters Union attempted Jo address an open-air meeting at Lyttelton without success. Last nights meeting was kept a secret except from those on the Union's side, and consequently there wero very few present when the nrst speaker started his address in Norwich Quay. Very soon, however, a hostile crowd of 200 or 300 collected, and started to heckle the speakers. Patriotic, songs were sung and there was much cheering and groaning. The three or four would-bo speakers, one of whom was Mr McCuJough, wero absolutely refused a hearing. Tho crowd several times tried to rush the speakeis, and blows were exchanged among tho crowd, and it required all the efforts of tho police to prevent a serious disturbance. Two local bandsmen brought their instruments, and added to the general uproar, and acted as accompanists to the singers.

Yesterday a "Press" roporter saw a student at tho Royal Military College, Duntroon, who is here on furlough, and asked him about tho cable message received yesterday, stating that two New Zealand students, both from Auckland, bad boen compelled to abandon their studies there. No comment was needed, ho said, as it was merely a matter of regulation. Both these men had failed in their attempt to get through the first year's examination at tho second attempt, and so were no longer elegiblo to continue with their course. He belie\'cd that it ivas mathematics that had brought them down. The only way in which such a state o{ affairs, to his mind, might bo remedied, would bo by raising the standard of mathematics in the entrance examination. At present those who knew the entrance examination only could have no idea how severe the" later examinations in that subject would be. General Godley's statement that the New Zealanders at the College wero doing well was quite justified, for on the -whole our men wero making most satisfactory progress. Maiden Island has little to offer in tho way of sport except surf bathing and fishing. "For the white man the attractions of surf bathing are sadly discounted by the presence of hundreds of sharks, w'iih whom tue nativesi appear to have a gocd understanding, being rarely molested by them. Wmto men never trust them, however, and often marvel how the natives can hvo in tho water with them for hours without coming to grirf. , 10ar5 . ,n S at Maiden Island nfford little enjoyment for their crews, who spend a good deal of their spare time shark nshmg. Sailors have an invctcrato hatred of sharks, which are shown no mercy when caught, but their tenacity of life is surprising. The second officer of tho barque Triton, which is now at Dunedin, relates that he caught a 12ft shark at Maiden Island, and when it was disembowelled stomach was full of overripe onions that had been thrown overboard that morning by tho cook. The shark had not been s^ n during tho day, but had apparently kept under the hull of the Vessel aud well out of sight until the evening, when it was hooked. After cutting off its tail (says tho "Otago Daily limes- ) the crew throw the shark overboard, and, to their surprise, it- fam away rapidly, minus its tail and. tno whole of It 3 digestive apparatus.

The Pensions Department is paying old age, widows', nnd military pensions (under tho now Act) on December 31st, instead of January Ist. At a sitting of tho Juvenile Court at Lvttelton yesterday three small boys wore charged with having let off fireworks in the streets. Mr C. Fcrrier, J.P- who was on tho bench, severely cautioned tho boys and discharged them. The following Christcbureb candidate* were successful in passing tho recent examination for Stato registration of niidwives:—Gcrtnido Bedford, 12th; Florcuco Reid, 14th; Olivo Rayner, 17th: Winifred Vca!e, 22nd; Mabel Knight, 23rd; Elizabeth Finlay, 30th. The- visiting Australian swimmers will arrive, from Wellington on Sunday, and will be accorded a civic reception by the Mayor (Mr H. Holland) at. tho City Counnl Chambers at 11 a.m. on Monday. Xo. formal invitations to tho reception have been issued, or will be issue*!. hut his Worship would like to see the citizens well represented at the function. Six men of the 12th Regiment Australian Light Horse (Tasmanian Mounted Rifles), under Warrant Officer Laeev, arrived in Christchurch on Wednesday night, and left last night on a flying visit to Rotorua. They aro a well-set-up,' soldierly-looking lot, in uniforms much like those of our own men, save that theirs have scarlet facings. They will return on Christmas morning, and will be competitors in the big Military and Naval Tournament to bo held on tho Show Ground* on December 26th and 27th. A deputation consisting of Sir Arthur Guinness, Mr Felix Campbell (chairman of tho Greymouth Harbour Hoard), and Mr W. B. Gilbert (secretary of tho Board), intends waiting: on tho" Prime Minister and tho -Minister of Railways at Wellington to-<lay in connection" with tho Board's dissatisfaction with tho return supplied by the Railway Department to tho Board of receipts and expenditure of the Brunncr section of the West Coast railway, and the wharfage collected on tho Greymouth wharf. Tho Board complains of the absence of details in the return and it also wishes to ascertain, in -respect to the coal from the State coal mine at Runanga, whether tho Government pays for the handling of tho coal on the wharf, or has it handled free of cost. Yesterday a ''Press" reporter was permitted to see the Hector modal, awarded for tho first timo at.the jubilee of tha Philosophical Instiiuto or Cantorbury to Dr. L. Cockayne, Ph.D., F.R.S., which has now reached its recipient. The obverse- shows a really excellent portrait of tho lato Sir James Hector, and bears tho inscription:— "To commemorate tho work of Sir James Hector, X.C.8.," together with tho date of his birth and death. The reverse, is well-designed and composed, tlio chief figure being an ancient Maori, snaring a huia. In. tho distance are mountains, a lake with a Maori canoo being in the middle distance. On the left aro a few trees and a flax bush, and below all tho signs of tho scientist, a globe with tho Southern Cross on it, a geologist's hammer, chemical retorts, and some books. On tho rim is engraved:— "Presented to Leonard Cockayne, Ph.D., F.R.S., for his researches in botanical ecology. Awarded 1912." Tho rush of holiday passengers for tho Christmas season has fairly set in. The Maori brought 449 passengers from Wellington yesterday morning, and it is stated that her accommodation will be heavily booked for the next fortnight. Tho Union Steam Ship Company has made arrangements for several extra passenger steamers to assist the Maori and the Mararoa in transporting passengers between Lyttelton and Wellington. The Tarawera is leaving Wellington to-night at 8.30 p.m. to carry any overflow from the Maori, and, if. required, will leavo Lyttelton on Monday night on arrival of the 7.40 p.m. train, to assist the Mararoa',' which leaves on arrival of the 5.25 p.m. train. Tho Mararoa and Pateena will leave Wellington to-morrow night for Lyttelton, and tho latter vessel will return north on Sunday afternoon. Tho Maori and tho Monowai are sailing from Lyttelton to-morrow night as usual, and will return on Tuesday morning. They will both leave Lyttelton again on Tuesday night, the Monowai on arrival of tho 5.25 p.m. train, and the Maori on arrival of the 7.40 p.m. train. With Christmas now Ipss than a week off, residents of and visitors to Christchurch should ava:l themselves of tho few days still remaining to inspect tho special exhibit of exquisite and inexpensive gifts now showing at Graham, Wilson, and SmeJljes—The People's Place For Value—tho store you can depend upon to supoly your every need at the lowest possible price. 6 Tho trials of travel! Don't add to them by journeying with unchecked baggage There's a better, a surer wny—chock your haggogo through us. We call for it, check on, and ueliver The N.Z. Express Coy., Ltd. . 0

THE NEW RAILWAY MANAGER,

It is many years since Now Zealand has advertised for such a higMr salaried officer as the "general manager of railways," whoso £3000 a year is now agitating quito a number of well posted officials in all tho British railway companies (says our London corrc» pondent). The sum is a-good ono'ibi a first-class man, especially with a five years' engagement and passage for his wife and family. The High Commissioner is circulating to enquirers a quantity of information about the New Zealand system, its mileage, employment (14.000 hands), capital invested (£32.000,000), and ratio of expenditure to receipts. Tho circular continues:— "Tho policy in railway management is determined by the Government, and is communicated to the General Manager through tho Minister of Railways, w- uis the supremo head of the Department but who directs the policy only. The general manager exercises administrative control in respect to tho operation of tho lines; he would thus mako recommendations to tho Minister regarding the fixing of rates and -charges, and wage* payable to the railway staff, and tho general conditions governing its employment." "Efficiency and economy in management" are tho essentials. The date of closing of receipt of applications is indeterminate.

A GUILDHALL INCIDENT. '"The Times" gives an interesting account of tho assembling of .the guests at the Guildhall for tho Lord Mayor's banquet. "This not only constitutes a brilliant spectacle in itself, but tho reception given to the loading guests by the bulk of the roinpany indicates, very often, the drift oi public opinion— at least in the city. It takes place in the library, which is bung for the occasion with the varied banners of ir.« City Guilds. On the dais at tho upper end of tho hall stands tho Lord Mayor in his robes, accompanied by the Lady -Mayoress with her Maids of Honour, to welcome his chief guests. As each guest arrives his name is announced at the lower end of the hall and he walks up to the dais, between tho lines of tho assembled company, amid cheers and clapping of hands of varying cordiality. "But there could bf) no mistaking the warmth of the greeting given to tho Greek and Bulgarian Ministers, and tho Servian ChargQ d'Affaires. Thcso diplomatists came in company, and the ushor wished to announce them separately, in the usual mode. 'No,' said the Greek Minister, 'wo will go up together.' And so they went, side by side, to an accompaniment of inspiriting applause."

"TIPS" IX U.S.A. CUSTOMS-. SERVICE.

Another indication of the abuses with which tho United States Customs Service is honeycombed—or at least

was, prior to recent much-needed r«v forms-is furnished i.x the suit of the Government agnihst the Federal Shew " Konning Company tor nlmtt:. £",> u>o representing uuder-paymeuts of "«•„« ' on lrojiortert raw sugar (writes our Sail Jbrancisco correspondent); Tho Gov ernnient charges, and it is admitted' that gratuities, or bribes, according td the point of view, were constantly paid the Customs weighers at the companvV factoncs. In return for this tba weighers aro alleged to have persist! ently underweighed the sugar, thus allowing the company to escape tho payment of largo sums of duty. Tho president of tho defe.rdant concern replies that although tho weights may not always have boon correct they worn as often ngainst the company as ngainst the Government. Ho admitted tho payment of gratuities, but - said they were in no sop so bribes, "but just such a tip as is given to 'a waiter Hi a restaurant to or sure good ser* rice. They aro known as houso money.' and were pnid by every concern that did business with the Cu-u toms people before Collector Loeb put an end to tho system and relieved the companies of an unjust burden."

THE E.M.F. SHOWS A TURN OF

SPEED. The Studebnker-E.M.F. came out for its first speed trial under competitive ■ * conditions last Saturday, and all tliiug* considered it put up an excellent performance. Started only in one event, . tho five mile open handicap, it camp second in a remarkably sue'edy field. Tho "E.M.F. 30 was linn&cappod on a basis of a speed capacity of t>2 miles an hour, a speed which has been .. actually attained by tho car in a private trial on New Brighton bench under somewhat better running conditions than obtained on Saturday. Tho E.M.F. therefore entered "the lUs against expensive- British t and Continental cars, on tho scratch mark. The car covered tho 5 miles at a pace of naarlv 50 miles an hour, not ,it all a bad turn of speed under, conditions far from ideal from a racing standpoint. We do not lay any especial emphasis on tho E.M.F's. speed viabilities, but we refer to Saturday's performance merely as an indication that in the best of company tho E.M.F. can hold its own when it comes to a test of speed and power. Wo nro pleased to see anyone interested in motors at our garage, whether prospective purchasers or not. and we nave a sectional chassis of tho E.M.F. on view that is well worth any motorist's inspection. Tho five-soater Studcbakor E.M.F. flOh.p.. complete with hood, wind shield, 5 lamps, clock and speedometer is £375. The four-seater Stndobaker-Flandcrs, 20h.p., smaller sister to the E.M.F., with same equip- . ment, sells at £295, and the 2-seator » Studebakor-Flanders, 20h.v>., with sann? equipment; sells at £275. all prices • being inclusive. Adams, Ltd., for Studebaker cars, garage, Tuam ~ • street, near Ih'gh street shop >i '"

IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS.

The only telephono ,numbers of Smith's Taxi-cabs, Ltd., aro 1888 and ' 1337, which ring direct to tho Company's Head Office. Open day and night. ' ■ ■ C .

B:S.A. Silent Knight Cars, fitted with Daimler Engines. We have just landed one of theso marvellous cars, which will bo on V'e.w at our Garage today and to-morrow. A. W. Smith' - and Son, Central Garage, Worcester street. 6

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume XLVIII, Issue 14513, 20 December 1912

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3,607

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume XLVIII, Issue 14513, 20 December 1912

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