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CHRISTCHURCH.

TjieffCliristclitirch:.Council" Chamber, was filled'with' an ihtor^te|".4gathr-ring. last nigKt<;. wheh>tho ceremony of installing Mr office took place. :';, .-., , 1 The' rdtiring "Mayor (Mr,,:-J..'YJ. Dougiiil) -""presided,. and■" thero , were present—Councillors W.H." Cooper, T. Gapes', E. Smith, .W...R. Smith, H. Hunter;' A. D. Hart. W. Millar, ¥. Burgoyne, A. S. Taylor, A. Williams, H. J. Otley, 11/Bj'Sorensen, . 'Iho Mayor'said'it was customary for tiie retiring Mayor to.givo a 'resume of tho civic work accpmplif-hed'd ( nring tile. year, and • that was what he ..proposed to do. Tho financial position of tho Council was really tho samo now as it was twelve months ago. On tho General Account the estimated general expenditure for 1011-12 was- £86,371 los 7d. Deducting , £18,343 7s 3d for salaries, cemeteries, waterworks, and electrical departments, and expenditure on baths and electrical accounts,, the estimated expenditure on tho general account was £68,028 8s 0(1. Tho approximate actual expenditure was £66,631 3s ; 5d,-u. difference of £1307 ss. The ! estimated general receipts for 1911-12 were £89,242 14s 4d, which, after deducting-£18,355 for the items previously „ mentioned' loft £70,887 14s- 4d. '. '' The approximate actual receipts were £66,852 8s 2d, being £4,035 6s 2d short of the estjmate. The.', ..shortage, however, ..was fully accounted< for by the. outstanding generalrat.es, which totalled approximately £5527. ..-..'.-Tho debit balanco on the t'eitti'hl.Account on March 31st. 1911, was £36.148 2s 2d, which after deducting £3489 Is Id advances to, other accounts,, ..- left £32.659 Is..- Id. The appraxiinato expenditure during the year was £66.631 3s sd, which made the total-debit £99,290 -Is'6d.- The approximate receipts during tho year | were £66,852 8s • 2d, leaving' an -niiproxiinato debit balanco on M fai-eli.* 411 st,■ 1912. ■ of . £32,437 -~ 16s Id. '"Tho. .expenditure'on . the ,el**ctrichT . pTarnt"' durinff. . tho' year was £2."*l)sr 17s 10d... YTIio receipts, on the : maintenance account amounted to £10,.>14 12s Bd, and the expenditure*, exclusive' of depreciation to £12,183 Ss Id. leaving a balance cf ,L'3lk)l 9s 7d. Tho approximate dcbiH balance on the- electrical accbunt now stood at£16,827 10s 6d', Reviewing the departmental work of the year the Mayor said that 29,697 yards of met-I were used in the city as follow: —Central AVard 11,322, Sydenham Ward 9232. St. Albans Ward 6774.'Linwood. Ward 2369; ;total -9,697. Tho following utileage of streets were metalledjn each*';ward':—Central Ward lniilo 71 chains, Sydenham. Ward 2 '•'. chains, Linwood Ward 2S chains, St. Albans Ward 2 miles 30 chains; total 6 miles 5o chains. ' Of tho above P0 chains on Moorhouse avenue and. 6 chains in Oxford tcrraco wcro , made with tarred macadam. •• * - A great' amount of tarred *-mc tai and ordinary patching was'carried out in tho Central Ward, St. Albans and Richmond. In tho matter of channeling and kerbing.'l railo'3o chains o? new channels were put in in tho St. Albans Ward* tbo paths asphalted, and the roads graded to suit new channels. Ei-'ht miles 11 chains of wooden kerbs had been taken out and renewed in concrete in the Central Ward, and this year would see the finish of the workTho Aieason had not been a suitable one for tarriug work owing to the. great amount „ wet weather but despito that fact "5,450 gallons of tar -had been*-used. Ai.total mileage of 33' miles t'jO.chaius of paths had been top-dre-sed in the "various, wards divided *■ as' follow:—CeutraL Ward 8, miles 20 chains', Sydenham Ward 11 miles chains, St. Albans" Ward 13 miles 70' chains, Linwood Ward 10 total, 33 miles OO.chaitis. Tanks" with furnaces *_ad.-beph~ erected * in the Central

"Ward for boiling tar, tho wiiber and oils being extracted. With tho tar thus heated the metal could be tarred and carted almost'immediately on to tho street whereas with tho crudo tarred metal, time was required to ellipse, for the metal to bind. Thirty* eontnic.ts had been let during theryeav, chief amongst- which Ywere additions "to tho Water Works Pumping Station, bridge.rover Dudley<• creek, Suction Gas-produfcer, pumtiirig ■ plant, Peptic' tank, pig hoists and dressing room :.t the abattoir. The year had beon ;t fairly, busy ono iv- tho-building lino, especially in tho • St. Albans Ward which would be seen from tho following' figures:—lnner Area 45, value £43,890, fees £89 10s •■' Central Ward 70,,.va1ue £25,155, fees £83 LCs; Sydenham. Ward 123, value £40,-120, fees £136 os; 'St.- Albans Ward : 231-, £93,105, fees £300 10s; Linwood Ward 61, value £19,451, fees £66 los; totals '530, value £222,021, fees £676 10s. portions of five streets had been widened in St. Albans Ward and ono-in Sydenham. In tho majqrity of cases the owners had given the land, the Conned re-erecting the fences. Tho following was , the quantity , of. water used for dust' allaying in • tho various wards quite irrespective of tho Tramway Board:—Central Ward 16,148,800, Sydenham Ward 2,0G0,000 gallons, Linwood Ward. 1,799,000 gallons, St. Albans AVard 1,735,700 gallons; total 22,514,300 gallons. That total was much lower than last year duo no doubt to the wet season. Tho following streets had been laid out by privato owners and dedicated to the Council: —Mersey street, Cranford street (exten.), Severn street, llanfurly; street (cxten.), Berwick street; thejso are .all in tho St. Albans Ward. Wordsworth street (exten.), Sydenham. It might bo interesting to note that tho length of streets in the city at the time of the amalgamation with suburbs, was 123 miles' and bad. -since increased to 142 miles 27 chains, the total approximate area being about 900 acres. During tho year 1101 ordinary connections for water have been pnt in, and 501 metered, connections bringing the total number of ordinary connections to 7698, and metered connections to 1823, and making flio' grand total 9521.-A contract* ..had been let for an additional pumping plant, and a new wing had been, built, on to the Pumping Station to'receive the same. A new suction gas producer had also been installed. Twenty thousand pines had been planted on, tho. sandhill reserves near Bottle Lake during, the ' year, and were doing well. Beds in the city reserves that wero maintained by the Beautifying Association had been handed over to the Council. A septic tank had been constructed to take the abattoir sewage, instead of running down the Lincoln road sewer, the effluent being distributed over about 4_ acres of tho adjoining paddocks. New pig hoists had been-placed in the slaughter-house for -moro effectually dealing with tho slaughtering of the pigs. - A dressing room - had been erected for tho use of the slaughtermen. A number of important events had taken place during tho year, the .chief being the Coronation of the King, wliich "had been loyally observed in Christehurch. .A large sum was subscribed to erect a Homo for Consumptives, as a Coronation ilemori.il, and although tho expedition wished for in the erection of tho building liad not taken placo yet, ho thought that the Homo would lie established, before long. He would liko to say that tho inauguration of _the Coronation Memo-rial movc.ment.was duo to'the' lato Mr T. E. Taylor, who was Mayor at the time' By tho death of Mr Taylor the city had lost a very valuable, energetic, and enthusiastic, politician, and a good administrator. ' Referring to other events .of the year, Mr Dougall said that the Lake Coleridge power scheme was •in'a', more of leks embryonic state, and it had been found Impossible so far to ascertain definitely from tho Government, what-would bo the charge for current, and until that was fixed he assumed.that xho*Council would do nothing in the way 'of undertaking* any

expenditure in connection ■v.'ith tha--scheme. During the next few niontr.s tho Council would bo called on t-o decide whether they would take over the Public Library or lior. A great deal would depend oh the terms ot the de< laratory judgment to he obtained, h"t even if tho Hoard of Governors kept the Library and starved, ho .though- the Council should take it over as a Municipal Library. One pleasant even; or tho year was the vk-.it paid by *'"] Mayor and councillors to Timaru, and he felt sure that that visit would do a lot of good. Tho now Local (iovernment Hill v.-as an important matter affecting the Council. Referring to tbe Canal Comuiissioners' report, -M 1 * Dougall said he vould urge upon the new Mayor and Council to press the Government to carry out the proposals to improve the railway facilities between Lyttelton and Christchurch- A meeting of thoso citizens in sympathy with the defence scheme had ocen held during the year, and it was decided that-those who Wished to do so might attach themselves to the Territorials as honorary members. He -did not know what the attitude of the Council would be on that matter, but he thought it was a. good proposal. Recently a* Japanese.squadron"'hud visited New Zealand, ''hen' camo the Japanese Antarctic expedition,, which'seemed poorly equipped for that work, and then visits were received from a naval and army expert from Japan. Those might be coincidences, but he thought they should bo considered when the defence scheme was under consideration. Mt* Holland then took the declaration, and was invested with the insignia of office, the robe aud the gold chain. Mr Dougall "wished Mr Holland a pleasant year of office, nnd expressed the conviction that Mr Holland would bo a worthy successor to thoso who had preceded him. Mr Holland said that one of the first things ho intended to do. was to call a special meeting of the Council to dee'de what the future policy was to.be. He felt that he hud received , a -..mandate from the electors to put forward a progressive liolicy, and' lie lioncd to have tho support of the Council in the mat-, ter. Mr Holland then paid a high tribute to-the: excellence and competence of the Council's staff. He realised the responsibility ho had undertaken, and hoped to discharge the duties of his hi_'h office, with the same efficiency displayed by his predecessors. Ho regretted that the limits of the Council Chamber prevented his dispensing much in the way of ho-jpitality, and he agreed with Mr Dougall that the city should possess something better in the shape of a Town Hall. He would, however, take the opportunity later on of entertaining the citizens.

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CHRISTCHURCH., Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 14344, 2 May 1912

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CHRISTCHURCH. Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 14344, 2 May 1912

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