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NEWS OF THE DAY.

A man named Albert Neilsen, aged 36-years, pkaded guilty at Wellington yesterday to entering a private dwelling and stealing goods valued a. £3. He was committed for sentence. The robbery was committed in the presence of tho woman occupier of the premises, accused saying that he would takevvhat he iik-d, and would knock her brains out if she interfered.

Some two years ago a number of chamois were imported to New Zealand and l.berated on the Southern Aips. Except on one occasion a few months after their liberation, nothing was afterwards seen of the animals (mvs the "New Zealand Times"). A Wellington .-resident, who has just :c----turned from a tour in the. southern mountain district, states, however, that one member of the herd was seen recently by a guide on the flats' near Mount Cock. The chamois seen jras alone, and it is doubtful whether it is a sole survivor or merely a wanderer from the flock.

The "highest tribute ever paid to the Melbourne rat was that which came recently (writes "Woomera" in the Australasian) from Mr Donald Melville, M.L.C. He was talking to a witness "-n the Legislative Council about the foundations of the cool stores which tbe Government intends to build near Victoria Dock. "Do you think the rat could eat. through it?" he asked. "It" is reinforced concrete, 15 to 18 inches th'ck! Up in North Queensland thoy will gravely spin you yarns that the white ants eat iron rails if they are siven a little time allowance, but they go shy on rat yarns. I have heard ant s v ories and fish stories, but I see that the rat story is going to beat them all.

The committee of the Canterbury branch of the St. John Ambulance Association . met last n ; ght, LieutenantColonel Cresswell, V.D.. presiding. It was decided to place notice boards in conspicuous p'aoes drawing attention to the position of first-aid depots, and to have some additional depot boxes made and equipped. Records of services by members of the. Association and Brigade in Canterbury and on the West Coaft wero submitted for recognition, and referred to the Executive Committee to deal with. The secretary was authorised to circularise country, tovm, and suburban residents pointing out the work done by the Association and the Brigade, and asking for financial support.

The unpleasant episode in India, m which a prominent native ruler turned his back upon Boyalty, recalls an episode in the life of tho late Mr R. J. Seddon, which the general public may have forgotten (says tho Wairarapa "Age.") In tho year 1593 Mr Seddon accompanied Lcrd Ranfurly, then Governor! of the Dominion, on a visit to Hastings. The Mayor and h : s councillors wore assembled at the railway Nation to extend a civic welcome to the Vice-regal party. His Excellency shook hands with each of the councillors in turn. The Prime Minister was doing likewise, but when he came to a certain councillor that gentleman deliberately turned his back upon Mr.' Seddon. Tho • insult was resented by the local . press, _ and the • oublic showed its disgust by relegating the councillor to obscurity on the first opportunity. Mr Seddony though he laughed at the .n----cident. was plainly affected at tho insult offered.

Remarkable discrepancies are shown, in the census figures, when compared with the more recent canvass of West Australia, made by the police (says the Sydney "Telegraph"). This is the first adequate check that has been applied to the' results' of the census, and a deficiency is disclosed which is causing the Home Affairs Department to wonder just where: it stands in the point of knowledge of Australia's population. Tho police canvass was conducted under the guidance of the Commonwealth Electoral Department, and was regarded as thoroughly efficient. Yet this is how it turns out:—-Census figures of persona over age of 21 years, 167,072; electoral canvass, 151,953; • difference, 15,119. Tho weight as to v thoroughnessis stated to be all on the side of the police-canvass. The position created is remarkable, in that since tho Commonwealth is to pay 25s per head of population to tho States on the census basis, West Australia may be getting a little more than her fair share. There is going to be 'an enquiry.

Certain metallic elements have their sicknesses, but perhaps the tin plague is the most remarkable.. If tin catches cold (says the London "Lancet") it will decay, it will lose its lustre, and finally crumble to a grey powder. The change is not a chemical one, for the grey powder-is still tin, and it can be brought back by careful warming to its original healthy condition. Apparently, when the tin is very pure it is more susceptible to cold and consequent decay. In fact, it may be made proof against the disease by alloying it with other metals. The disease is a source of considerable annoyance and disappointment to the collectors of coins who possess valuable tin specimens in their cabinets. This curious failing of tin may possibly have led to the use of the word "tin" as a term of reproach, as in such expressions as "a tinpot institution," or "a tin soldier." Even tin buttons have been known to crumble in this way, and organ-pipes made of tin have been found to decay after a severe "winter. >

Most riflemen have heard of the "Waihi Rooster," a trophy with a history. Its origin dates some years back, when there was keen rivalry between the Ohinemuri Rifles and the Victoria Rifles (Thames). Some nine or ten years ago the Victorias paid a visit to Waihi to try conclusions with' the Ohinemuri Rifles, who were sanguine of victory, their sergeant having had a rooster fashioned out of tin, and affixed to a flag pole. As the Ohinemuri team were beaten the Victorias demanded the rooster as a trophy.. The demand was declined, but the trophy mysteriously disappeared until, about a year afterwards,* it suddenly was discovered in the Victoria Rifi«s' orderly-room. It was then given a coat of paint, and constituted a trophy to be competed for. the Chinemuri's being the first to win it. It has now been won by the Victorias (twice), Ohinemuri's, Franklin Mounted Rifles, TaranaH Rifles, Dannevirke Rifles, and Feilding Rifles— by the last-mentioned a few days ago, at Penrose, Auckland

The time for receiving tenders for the sunpiy of in connection with the £ake Coleridge- electric power scheme has been extended from March 27th to May Ist.

A ballot of the members of the Canterbury Agricultural and ■ Pastoral Labourers' Union is being.taken on tne question of amalgamating with the Waimato Workers' Union. The ballot papers are to be returned by the first of next month.

The Stanmore Brass Band will play the following programme on Victoria square rotunda this evening, . commencing at" eight o'clock: —March, "North Star"; waltz, "Maid of the. Mist"; selection. of Angels"; two-step, "Motiastruck"; march, "Last Stand"; selection, "Bohemian Girl"; narch. "Yield to None."

The\New Zealand Swimming Championship meeting will this year be held in Christchurch in the Tepid Bath on February.. loth, 17th, 20th, and 22nd. The championships w'li be under the ausp-'ces of the New Zealand Amateur Swimming Association, and it is anticipated that there will be a large inflnx of swimmers from all parts of the Dominion. Amcngst the championships to be decided will be tho 100 yds (first day) 220 yds, and SSOyds (second day), 220 yds breast stroke championship (th'rd -day), and 410 yds championship (fourth day).

The new steamer for the Lake Wakatinu service is h»ing conftructed at Kinuston as rapidly as possible by the contractors, Messrs J. McGregor and Co. (telegraphs our Dunedin corr&snondent). The hull is set up on the ways, and seven squads of nien are riveting ur> the olates in tho firm's shop in "Dunedin. The steamer's boilers and eng'nes are nearing completion, and the shafting and propeller, which are practically completed, will be sent forward to Kingston next week. It is'expected that the steamer will be launched at the end of this month.

Last evening a social gathering in connection with the Primitive Methodist conference was h?ld in the Edgeware road church. There was a large attendance. Mr Lill being in the chair, and Mr G. Smart in the vice chair. During the evening addresses were given by the Revs. J. Sliarpe, J. Bennrig, : R. J. Liddell, and others. Suitable anthems were sung by the choir, and an enjoyable evening was spent-by thoso present. The conference will open at 9.30 a.m. to-day in the Cambridge terrace church. In the even'ng the official conference service-will take, place, in the same church, and the Rev. J. Southern, the General Committee delegate, will be the preacher

Referring' to the documents belonging to the late'Mr Stiff era, of New Plymouth', which/Ir W. T. Jennings is presenting to the Dominicn, iltr Jennings states that among the.letters is one written by tho man who was known as "the Bayard of the Now Zealaud forces," Yon Tempsky, the long-haired, dashing Prussian; ppor "Yon," as the men called him, daring, chivalrous;" gallant soldier of fortune^—the, :manwho had carried his life in his hand in Mexico, had sought gold in California, had piloted the British tip rivers in Central Africa, and fought and starved in the Waikato and East Coast for New Zealand. Someone blundered on that fateful 7th September, 1858; when his life, as well as many other brave men, was sacrificed. The letter in question gives an account of the fight ram'ea and the operations at Weraroa Pa.

With reference to the statement that the people of Lyttelton are paying 7Jd per loaf for bread which can bo bought in Christchurch for od, a leading baker in Lyttelton informed a "Press reporter yesterday that he gavo his customers the option of paying cash for their bread, which he delivered at their doors or sold to them over the counter for -evenpenco cash So far as he know, this price aiid this system had been in force in Lyttelton for about 2$ years. When bread was "booked" he charged 7Jdj but he,had not more than fourteen or. fifteen people on his books, paying their accounts monthly. This was the practice of all the bakers in Lyttelton, Speaking for himself, he said that he had a "round" of customers to whom ho supplied 110 large loavos daily on an average. To deliver this quantity ho had to keep one man, one boy, two horses, and one cart, at a cost of £4 9s per week, which worked out at over lid por loaf.

Invercargill has never seen an aeroplane in flight, but if the confidence of thoso who are now engaged constructing a machino of the kind is not misplaoed that interesting experience is not far distant (says the "News"). In fact an assurance has been given that next week an ascent will bo made. Several engineers, wore engaged on Tuesday morning making ready in a tent in Esk street, and, contrary to tho socretiveness usually displayed when such operations aro in progress, tho work was being carried out in full view of passers-by. The frame of the machine is that designed by Mr H. Pither, who, it will be remembered, took it to Melbourne, but owing to legal proceedings, it was returned, and is now in the possession of "Moana," the wellknown Maori wrestler. The engino originally used was not considered sufficiently powerful, and another, ; of 30 horse-power, aud weighing 901b, which has been procured, is being fitted up.

"A Kent Man,", who has been 35 years in South Africa, writing from Capetown to an Auckland resident, says:—"Speaking as,a mechanic I wish to warn your readers that South Africa is- not such a- happy hunting ground, nor such a land of milk and honey as people in England are led to; believe. Working-men have had to struggle very hard for a bare existence. The cost of the necessities of life are 30 per cent., and rent.4o per cent, higher than'in England. The prices of work have been cut down to nearly starvation " point. There are no. labour organisations, and capitalists haVe it all their own way. Thousands of people have left these stores during the acute depression in trade, flying from poverty. South Africa is not a white man's country;'there is such a preponderance of blacks who work for starvation wages, and employers of labour don't care as long as they get their work done cheaply.' Artisans get from 3s to 5s a day; labourers, ,2s to 3s a day; and farmers' boys, Is to 4s a month, with food and shelter. It is impossible for white men to compete with these rates, and elderly men especially have a bad time, for there is no old age pension here."

A meeting of tho General, Labourers' Union was held on Tuesday evening, Mr E. Hamilton, vice-president, presiding over a good axtendance. It was decided to appoint an organiser to enrol members and to go into-the subject of discussing the amalgamation of certain unions with the General Labourers' Union. The nominations for th© position are to close at next meeting ,and the election will take place at the following meeting. A letter was received from the Agricultural and Pastoral Labourers' Union stating that that Union had passed a motion in favour ot amalgamation with the General Labourers' Union. It was decided that the General Labourers' Union was in favour of the proposed amalgamation. It was reported that the ballot on the question of the' Union joining the New Zealand Federation of Labour (registered) resulted in the proposal being earned, the voting being:—ln favour 247, against 59. The agreement arrived at with the Timaru employers was endorsee], and the seal, of the Union was afl3xed_to it. A special meeting is to be held next week to discuss the question: "Is it beneficial for .unions to remain under tho Conciliation and Arbitration Act?" The affirmative is to be taken, by; Mr C. Littleeote, and the negative by Mr 73£ OimpbalL

—mmm^—**~~~~^————^—~m—-mm*~~m*———mmmm—m—, mm . „ The valuation pf the Timaru M $ district, on which a small rate is struck, has increased from GJ millions to ICi . '; millions in tho last ton years. - , * The Canal Commission resumed at '> 9.30 a.m.,yesterday, and ' proceeded " ■' with the consideration of its report* The hearing of formal evidence was concluded.

A bottlo has been picked up a«ar Waikato Heads containing a lett-r showing that it'was thrown overboard on 30th December, 1901, from tho ».s. Moravian, in the South Indicn then within two days' steam of Australia, .The collection of stagnant water near Flaxton is now becoming a nuisance, and the stench from tlio decaying vegetation and the manure on the land, which has been heavily stacked, for action by . the authorities in tho

direction of assisting its drainage to thu river. Qn Monday and Tuesday numbers of gulls were % busy feasting on th* grubs or iro_x. A hot nor'-wester will make the affluvium disagreeable for tho Jj inhabited houses to the leeward, jjj? ■A number of immigrants wko.f;*' travelled to New Zealand -'m land in tho Federal Boulder Sh'r»jSf' i . steamer Somerset arrived from We)-.- 1 ' - lington by the Mokoia yesterday mora-V: ing. .Nine-landed at th* i others went on, to Dunedin. The New *V Zealand Shipp*ng Company's stoamer ■■. Ruapehu arrived at Wellington last.- ,_. night from London, and .a further ecu-- _ .. tingent ol new arrivals is due at Lyt» ; r telton to-morrow jnorn:nj£. Tho number of persons fordrunkenness in Dunedin for tne past*. . .■: year was 525 (483 males and 42 lomales),as aga'nst 526 (493 males and 33 ■- females) for the year 1910. During the- ' ,;. nast year the number of persons appre- ~; bonded in Dunedin for various offences ,\; ~ was 1909 males and 293 females. Tha '" . amounts recovered in fines and fees on . the criminal side totalled £1076 16s 6d. .; In 1911, 2141 males and 237 females - .' wero apprehended, and the amounts re- . ' cpvered in fees and fines totalled £1321 ' 7s 6d. ; The number of bankruptcies for, 'li the past year was-27, as against 1$ for. 7 : " 1910. •; A resident of Hokitika, who has just J; made tho trip to Otago via the Baast •= j" Pass, found the journey most interest- "h ing. In conversation with this gentle- '-if man a representative of the "Otago '■*;_ Daily Times" learned that tho residents Ifjs along;the route traversed are not altogether pleased with the method adopted ,W by the Tourist Department in spending % •the money allocated for expenditureon the track. It is suggested that in- '<■ stead of spending the money in a Jump sum the Department might with advan- - tage to ; tourists and others concerned engage tbe services of a'roadman at a permanent salary to.effect repairs where necessary, and thus make the'route ot more.service to those who wish to traverse th-3, pass.

The high price of boots ranied a few j .' enquiries to be made" in Dunedin. ' A t, gentleman in the leather business, asked to explain the h'gh cost of leather, sa : d tho one factor was tho scarcity of leather all over the world.' ■ Even America, where at one time they could not tan all the hides on their , hind*, was now buying as far afield as • > New Zcalahd, and- competing with local . buyers.. It was" almost impossible to propnro heavy stout hides. "Italy supplied tho world with its heaviest Ir'des. but even that country wns falling back in tho production. Years ago in New Zealand the hides were much heavier than latterly. Nowadays the cattle were slaughtered too young to produeo heavy skins; the skins wore ,not inaturcd ; Asked if. there was any pros- ' pect in the near future of a decline;in prices, tho gentleman answered in. j&a<i~ t ; - negative. "Thero is more likelihood ,- r of the opposite contingency,., fakjngr .' place," he said. ' ; Repairs in tho engine-room-of thor k 7<, ferry steamer Mararoa were completed '7 yesterday morning, and the vessel, : " --, sailed at? ~ 6.30 p.m. for ton. Tho work of repairing the broken I-\ thrust-block was carried out by Messrs , j Anderson, Ltd., who have made a very ";,, ] fine job. The .broken portion ,was -__\_\ secured in place by a heavy . plate' "7 bolted to the main part of the casting., 7:' The plate, which was five-eights of en " inch in thickness, was cut out to X • •<• the whole side of the. thrust blook easting and extending for the full length ' of 4ffc 7in, was "lapped" round both '• ends for about six iucbes. . About _ thirty one-inch bolts were- used to 60- - euro tho plate,- holes being drilled in the plate and in tho thrust-block cast- ■ 1 ings, and carefully fitted and secured . s with nuts. To ensure the maximum '. stability to th© thrust-block which . .'_. takes tho heavy 6train and weight-of ■> the ship, two lengths of 3 s 3 anglo ,v iron five-eighths of an inch in thickness .>,.' wero bolted perpendicularly on to the flate and the casting; Mr Ai.Carmaar -; ; " aspector of Machinery, inspected ;.tjMJ '!.■ --■ job. and expressed himself as entirely,.,,' j " satisfied and highly pleased with splendid manner in which tho work had; ; v j ; been carried out. In tho afteroboa the engines were given a full-speed fcf'al : ;V? '< and everything worked without *&«''';& slightest hitch. - \' Jf& The great post card craw, which. 1?E rose to a dizzy height some years back.',7>p! has gradually fallen to very much of a side line with the big shops. In *-•£ Auckland during the past year there-.'",; has been a very perceptible slackening ■■■;, off in the demand (says tlie oorrespon- " r?, dent of tho "Otago Daily Times"). , A Jj} leading bookseller who still stocks faim.---■ large quantities of post cards, informed <•% a reporter that the trade done in/onlf -7a few instances warrants bis window, \£ disnlays. Tho public taste has been . -a. caught by some other novelty, and now . the artistic photograph of the smiling .* beauty actress and the illustrated joke n on a highly-coloured card bold little at-. ■ retraction for man and maid. There. <_ was a time when a larger number of people learned tho names and • became ;■; acquainted with tho faces of London* ■'-." leading actresses by .means 'of post .- ;■ cards than by tho illustrated papers. It .'■ is very much different now. Actresses, ': and actors,- too. no longer add big 7*. sums to their salaries by posing for the ■ •>« picture post card public. Those with _'"_ a voice find that it pays better to sing ! r' into a phonograph. People who, do -'> •:? not own a phonograph, but are neighbours to one would attest ''•'■_ the truth of that statement. Scenic ■'". views ar<> still tho joy of tho post card 7 seller's heart. They always sell, even ;' if they are views of places like Rotorua, as they were once, perhaps, but as they -. : never will be again. Just now tho ■•■ demand is threatening to be bigger than the supply. . At Monday night's meeting of ■ the Timaru Borough Council the following 1 otter was received from the Mayor (Mr J. Craigio, M.P.):—"I write, to inform you that the period during which I agreed to .maintain the last . i section of trees which I planted in Craigie avenue has expired and 1 have now much pleasure in handing them over to the Council. On the Bth. of May, 1905, I wrote to the Council as follows:—'I will be pleased to have the Council's permission to allow mc to plant two rows of trees in the centre ot the Town belt, to form an avenue from North street to Hassal street, as a gin> to the town. It will be necessary to have the belts fenced in to protect tba - trees, and I would like' to have the care and charge of the work for, say, three years, till the growth of tho, trees !$ assured.' Continuing. Mr Crai_ie said: "In 1906 I slanted the second section from Hassefstreet to College road, and in 1908 the last section from College road to Main road." -In conclusion th* Mayor stated that it cave him mucH pleasure to hand the trees over to to* borough. Councillor Sealey moved » hearty vote of thanks be accorded th« ■ Mayor for his valuable gift, and that the trees ba taken over. The motion w„s carried unanimously. This letter, was written on November 24th last, prior to the general election, wtij». th* request of tho Mayer, »« »» over.

J'' All the Canterbury trout rivers, were reported clear at 9 a.m. yesterday. The first of tho poles' for the carryjn<7 of the lights and overhead wires for the Invercargill electric tramway tystem were pla©:_ in position in Dee erreet on Monday. At the Nelson Magistrate's Court yesterday, a woman Samcd Thomason, wife 01 'a publican, was fined 5a fcr throwing an egg ou the dress of a No-1-cense' at a street meeting p-tciding tho elections. Sne pleaded that she threw the egg at a heckler, but it accidentally struck the advocate. ■ ■_..■■•' The trade returns for Timaru for +b_ voar just closed exceeded those of SJ pSrious year. A total of 185,182 _?_• of merchandise were dealt with, including 699,149 carcases of frozen button, «,449 bales ot wool, and ' 456,299 bag? c L?_lf J. ho =%P»2 dues totalled £27,£44. being higher • / than that of any previous year. The r total revenue was £'37,519. At 4.30 on Christmas morning tho shop of Meesrs Rush and Gooder, jewellers, Wellington,, was burglariously entered, an iron bar on the workshop window being sawn through, and jtw-sl-kry valued'a t/i.27 taken. Yesterday a man, nam?d Bruno O'Moller, with sev.I' ra. alas.s, was charged with the thett, and also with hay ng burglars' tools in bis possession. He pleaded guilty and was committed for sentence. Accused ' was arrested, whon leaving tha prem.ses by a constable, assisted by the n ght-watchmau. Ho was armed with a billet of wood, with which ho tried to ,hit the night-watchman.

- Australia as a field for the aviator is attracting d good deal of attention in the home 01 airmanship, especially 6inco the announcement of Com- ' monwealth Government's intention to foster mechanical flight. A recent, arrival in Melbourne is Mr A. B. S;one, - a well-known English aviator, who will land a Bieriot monoplane about January 20th. ' It is his intention to give exhibition flights and compete in any aviation carnivals thai may be organ- - ised. Should sufficient inducement offer, Mr Stone will subsequently bring .his machine to' New Zeftlaijd and fly here.

Recently the Customs authorities at I Bluff had a scrap of brown paper, on J# which was th© following legend, sent W them for elucidation:—"Engine broke down at Green Point. Bend help. (Signed) T. Crockett." The document had been enclosed in a bottle, which . had been picked up on tho Chatham 3 Islands on November 30th, and it had been forwarded to the head office at Wellington- from there. Th© where- * abouts of Green Point is not exactly as * well known as, say,- London, but after considerable trouble the Wellington Customs people discovered that there { was such a place at Bluff. Naturally, ;'Mr T. Crockett,, who is-a well-known Bluff citizen, was at once summoned i to explain tho why and wherefore, but j, h© was as much' in tho "' mist as the' authorities themselves. However, on- > quiries were made, and it was gleaned ': that on August 25th of last year Mr ; , ■ Crockett was having a boat tried, the [ . engino of which temporarily refused duty. Two other well-known residents ;, qf Bluff wore handy at the time, and, jj thinking they would havo a good joke ■•>, at Mr Crockett's expense, wrote the | legond referred to, placed it in a bott tie. and,' committed it- to th© briny, } { : thinking that it would merely drift i to the Bluff wharf or the foreshore, 'i and that some of the Bluff people would ■ - pick it up. 'The incident had almost j . escaped the memory of those who were I responsible for it, when tho Customs Department took a hand in the game. It is interesting to note that tho dis- >,, tance from Bluff to Chatham Islands isl ' 700 miles, and it took the bottle A throe months to get thero. w-t Apropos of tradesmen being fined in ) " Wellington on Monday for selling light--3 -' weight bread, "M.J.*' writes to tho "Post" to the effect that the practice j of giving snort weight is not confined - to tho bakers, but that tho grocers are ; - equal offenders. He quotes a case where he went to a baker's 'shop to i ' purchase bread, and selected a 21b ; -loaf from many on th© counter, ten- . ■ dering 3Jv«. Tne baker'would not let him have it, but brought ono from the bakehouse. "M.J." asked the bakor ' to weigh the latter loaf, but this re- - quest met with a decided refusal, "and. when ho saw I wa_' determined to get my proper weight he gave mo my money back. . . It seems to mc also " that bread sold from tho window is different to bread'sold out of carts, in regard to both quality and weight." As to tho grocers, the correspondent says he:ha_ seen mora than one deal : . unfairly by children. "A child goes into a shop for a pennyworth of biscuits, and is given loa of inferior -• quality, such as-4d wine or 6d mixed. 1 Now that works out at Is 4d a pound." 2 ' 4 M.J." also complains - that many ; bakers do not keep scales in their shops. , Ho suggests that "bread should bo sold *? in Lowran-rSlb weight for the price !A ox 21b of bread, and be weighed on the || counter, with a piece cut.from another loaf towiske iip weight, and that small roils sftc-ukl ,oo taken round in the carts, and one given with each 21b loaf purchased at the door." He alleged that ho could quote several cases m respect to coal and milk, and- says the inspector can, if ho so desires, get his ; -, name and address from the "Post," ] and, "if ho writes to mo or calls upon I pw. I will give him som© idea where I to and unscrupulous tradesmen." f , Women hay© been discovering many ! good things at Graham,' Wilson and i- , Smsllie's gigantic Summer Salo now j , proceeding. Never before has such a '■ sale been open-to the Christchurch pubr.o. notwithstanding this firm's wonderful offerings in the past. 6 We can't make trains go faster or render you immune from raal-do-mer, ! " but we can say© you all bother with I your baggage. Just check through us. j . Wo call for it, check by rail or sea, : - receive and deliver at other end immediately. Costs trifle for cartage only. ! - The New Zealand Express Co., Ltd. '6 jj Do your feet porsjiir© and become t - -disagreeable to yourself and others? | ' Perhaps thb pores havo become un- \ healthy. Remove the cause. Sprinkle a little of Berry's Antiseptic Toilet / Powder in your socks. It removes' exI. co«sivo perspiration and cures "tender ,! feet, and promotes a healthy skin., ■ Only Is tin. Is 2d post free. . Jno: Berry, 670 Colombo street (opposite , . Jtaca's). 2 For the man or woman who seek the ;' createst value for tho money spent — I you cannot do better than to pay a | .;', 'visit to Graham, Wilion and Smellie's | f> gigantic Summer Sale. So far the sale [ l has been a record —merited by th© true ~i valne-giving. Early shopping is adi}'\ vised, as tho storo closes at 1 p.m. to- ' day. 6 I _ When moving, employ J. M. Hey- : . _ wood and Co.. Ltd., as thoy employ ■ none,but careful men to handle your ." ■ furniture. They havo three large panJ f ' technicons, so that no job is too large or small for them to undertake 2 ; ' ' If you . 'are deaf, call at John R. .-'. Procter's, oculist optician, 200 High . "" ttreet, Christchurch, who will demoni ' -strato. the "auris" to you. It is the r -,\ latest invention, and the perfection of ': "■■/"•Il hearing devices, and is the smallest, > , " lightest, cheapest, and best instrument ; , forth© deaf. Call to-day, or lot mc send ■;.:■{ fnU particulars; 0 .Th© Bradbury Motor Cycle wins •: _~-.. again. Information just to hand that Jyj7 .this- noted machine scored first and m, 'second in the D&nnevirke Trials last; Mp;. Saturday. This is undoubtedly a great _\:~'* performance, and should attract the m±;j prospect purchasers. The 1912 free S< s .',; engine, two-speed freo engine, and mt\p" &wd models are to hand; also arriving !■%*-* th» week the- second shipment of the rasVhw»otts A.J.S. Lightweight, Farmers «Ui'Co-op*rativo Garage Agents. . . o msph''. Tennis.—Lewis and Anderson have «|>-;;3*cded a sspecial shipment of r»ck«t* «#*od 1912 Ayres' championship balls, o

_ Motorists .will be interested to know that we make a special Una of the iepairs to accumulators, cc,"- and magnetos, which are purely electrical appliances. Turnbull and Jones, Ltd., Liectncal Engineers, Chris+church. 6 A ROOFED TOWN. An immen&a building is to t>o put U P at Clapham Junction (London) which i will form virtually a roofed-in town. !la the cub-basement will be a huge j market for fruit, vegetables, and provisions, which, will serve the whole or Isoutb London. Ok the ground level will be an arcade running nght round tho building, with large eSopa on eaca i xde. Above the shops will ba hve j floors, containing 200 fiats, and 3tM bachelor apartments of one room each. '.Each fiat will have its own telephone and its own bath-room. Right ft the top of the buildmjs, and covering its entire area, will bs a glass-covered root garden, with skating rink, children's play-ground, and bandstand. The centre of the building will.bo occupied by club premises for men and women, with I restaurant, smoke-room, writing-rooai, I drawing-room, billiard-room, and gyn> | nasium. There-will -ako be a concert hall capable -of accommodating 800 people. FLYIS'G THROUGH ETHER. According .to Mr W. L. Moore, Chief of the United States Weather Bureau, phenomenal times will bo made with airships in tho near future. Hβ says: — "Two hours' time will be all that's necessary'between Detroit and v New York, and London will be only ten hours 'out' from Now York. Wβ wiil be travelling so high in the a£r that a thermometer would show 50 degrees below zero, but we won't notice it because we will be speeding along in aluminium air ships or tubes. Aerial navigation soon will be past the experimental stage, and then you'll ccc very rapid development, fully as rapid as your automobile industry here was, and undreamed-of speed will come with the aeronlane. But this wonderful speed will be made at such a height that the aerial Craft will travel practically through ether. You won't- ride in a picturesque' aeroplane, such as you see imagined in tho lithographs. of today, and are going to be literally shot to wherever you journey. A oreakfast tn New York and dinner in London will be easy." A NOTORIOUS MONEY-LENDER. •■' The death was announced in .England tho other day at the ago of sixty nine, years, of 3lr John Kirkwood, money-lender. Mr Kirkwood gave evidence before the Select Committee of the House of Commons on raonoy-lend-inß.in 1897,.-'-At the-time ho was examined ho dealt in many places and in many names. He was . genterally_a company. "Can. you give the committee • any idea of tho number of your customers who have committed suicide?" asked Mr Ascrbft, M.P. at the Select Committee's enquiry. Mr Kirkwood described tho question as an unfounded accusation, arid denied that he •kept'a "suicide book" with entries of the deaths cf customers. Another witness", howover, informed tho committee that; three customers of the moneylender had committed suicide. One eftse; on which Mr Ascroft' questioned Mr Kirlrwood was that of a woman who had borrowed £60, and ultimately had to pay £689 principal and interest. Tho revelations in the examination of Mr Kirkwood by tho Select Committee facilitated the passing of the Moneylenders Act. paroljTsystem. Following the example of Mr Oswald West, the Democratic Governor of the State of Oregon, Cram, of tho Criminal Court of New York, has adopted: a new method of dealing with first-offenders, so as .to encourage thorn to keep ohfrof the clutches of the law: Judge Oram's practice is (says the New York correspondent of the London "Chronicle") to allow; all firet offenders for crimes less than murder to give their parole that they will live an honest life, and occasionally report themselves to the authorities. The judge not only ' has suspended . sentencoa in thege caaea, but has personally given his assistance in finding employment for the prisoners he paroles. A$ an example of how. well tho new system acts, 140 first offenders who were on parole were eummoned. to report .themselves recently. They included burglars, forgers, nnd highwaymen; Out of the number summoned 125 presented themselves, while eight, who could not leave their employment, wero represented by friende who came to speak for them. All were able to show that they were making an honest living, and mnny thanked the judge for his humane treatment of thorn, and said that it was the first time that* tbev had ever had "a decent chance. ,, MAKING DIAMONDS. The Boriia newspapers, announce (says Reuters correspondent) that a new process for the manufacture of artificial diamonds has been discovered by Dr. Werner yon Bolton, a chemist in the Siemens Halsbe works there. Tho doctor observed that ordinary lighting gas decomposes when exposed to the vapour of mercury, and that if the gas bo allowed to work on metallic amalgams of mercury the carbon contained in the gas is liberated in a ncn-crystal-liscd form and in crystals or diamonds. As the diamonds obtained were infinitesimal in size, diamond dust was placed In a tube'in which gas was dissolved to act as so-called mother cry.stals. Tho newly-formed crystals . adhere to these, and the result is a larger,' but still very small, stone. The amalgam used is natrium. It is placed in a glass tube containing a small quantity of diamond dusfc, and. lighting gas is passed'through the tube fer four weeks. The invontor is now engaged upon the problem of increasing the size of the stones. . ■■■•' ' . STUPENDOUS WORLD'S RECORD, 40.037 MILES IN 44 WEEiiia.' , The most remarkable record ever created in Great Britain on a motorcycle, or any other road vehicle, was established by Mr Harry Long on a ot a.p. Free Engm6 Triumph motor-cycte. Mr Long started out on January 4th, 1911, riding in all weathers, winter, spring, summer and autumn, he penetrated into every corner of the country, and oncircled the coast of Great Britain. The ride was purely a ;est for reliability. The same Triumph motor was used throughout his nde. On November 2nd, 1011, 10 months'after tne start, ho had travelled over 40,utjU miles, which, after allowing for 35 bjtnk days, averages over 1000 "miles per week. The Triumph Company were so proud of this performance that they exhibited this identical machine at the Olympia ohow, and Mr Long was in attendance to giro any information or his remarkable ride. In New Zealand, J. Braitliwaite, riding a Triumph, nas just broken the Wellington-Palmerston-Napier. motor record By two hours— .time, 6 hours 38min, non-stop rnnTaveraging 33 J mite* per hour. We are | now unpacking 50 $ r«e Engine Triumphs, ex s.s. Arawa, which have been on order over twelve months. Clients waiting for Triumphs should call at once, as the shipment will soon be sold. Tho Freo Engine Triumph is admitted S everyone as the best motor-cycle in o wholo world. Works output of oUU per month for 1912 are actually sold. Adams tJolo . Agents tor "Triumphs," High, street, Christchurch G. B. Brown, representative. 6 A CAB W^nol™ 0 ™ . Interview any Cadillac owner anywhere and you will find him utterly unwilling to consider any other car. There ari& something Jifce 40,iXM) Cadill*o "Thirty" Owner*, and when

ono of them tells you that no consideration could tempt "him t<* cha°f. c '' he » merely voicing the mental attitude- or all th© other owners.

A GREAT TIME-SAVER. We hay© just landed a large stock of the Michelin Bolt Valve Attachment. This clever articlo renders the use ot security studs unnecessary. Tyres can be changed in less than half the time, and tube nipping Js entirely eliminated. Price 2s 6d each. A. \V. Smith and Son, Central Garage b

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NEWS OF THE DAY., Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 14249, 11 January 1912

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6,328

NEWS OF THE DAY. Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 14249, 11 January 1912

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