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A LAWN TENNIS CHAMPION.

Mr Anthony Wilding's victory in the Victorian lawn tennis championship must be considered the

greatest effort of his tennis career. The Christchurch player has always recognised as his superior' the great Australian player whom he has just defeated. When the two met in a friendly game in Melbourne a few years ago, Brookes won fairly easily, and Wilding on his arrival here said there-was no one in the colonies equal to the Victorian. li* the current issue of the "Lone Eland" magazine, Mr Wilding, in an interesting article on lawn tennis, expresses the confident opinion that Brookes is the finest player the world has.ever seen. That is, of course, purely a personal opinion, though we admit . that Mr Wilding speaks as' an expert; H. L. Doherty is the greater name in the tennis world, and many English players and critics would maintain that be was a better man than Brookes. Unfortunately a match was never played between theytwo under satisfactory conditions. By defeating Brookes, then, Willing may be said to have climbed to the'highest rung of tbe tennis ladder. Hitherto lie bis been placed below, the Australian. But that he has greatly improved in tbe last year or two was shown by "bis play in the Davis Cup contests in Sydney, when, in the deciding match, it lay with him whether Australia retained the Cup or surrendered it to America. By his defeat of Alexander he enhanced his already high reputation as a brilliant player, and confounded the critics who thought be ought, pet lo have been chosen. It is as certain as anything can be in games that Brookes and Wilding will again represent Australia in the forthcoming contest for the Cup. The American players have been generally considered to h«ve a poor chanoe, but a message this morning describes them as capable of great possibilities. It is to be hoped that contests for the Cup may some day soon be played in New Zealand. The play in the Australasian champion* ships here a few years ago gave lovers of tho game an idea of what really firstclass tennis is like, and to most of those present must have been a revelation, that whetted the appetite for more. Lawn tetania has long since ceased to be regarded as an efffeminAte game. ' Every year it is becoming moire popular in a score of countries, and the general standard of play is steadily rising. A visit fto_i Brookes dtod some first-class English and American players would be of great benefit to the game in New Zealand.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19091115.2.27

Bibliographic details

A LAWN TENNIS CHAMPION., Press, Volume LXV, Issue 13580, 15 November 1909

Word Count
429

A LAWN TENNIS CHAMPION. Press, Volume LXV, Issue 13580, 15 November 1909

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