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SCHOOL EXHIBITS AT SHOWS.

One of the features of the recent Royal Agricultural Society's Show in Melbourne waa the display of exhibits by the school children of the State, which were so extensive and varied as to suggest tbat gardening and agricultural education receive more attention in the primary schools of Victoria than in New Zealand. Apparently for the purposes of exhibition the Sti-te wag divided into districts, and each district made a distinct' disploy, to which all the schools within its boundaries contributed. For instance, fifty-six shar. ( in the Warrnambool exhibit, in which forestry and horticulture were most prominent. One school sent "an in- " structive set of graftings, illustrating " tbe correct process step by step," another showed a fine sample of „ a new winter fodder plant, and a third was to the fore with a collection of fodder grasses, while a fourth, in the centre of a timber district, displayed a variety of native woods, cut into sections, planed, and polished, with cards showing the commercial uses of tbe different varieties. One of the schools in the Bendigo district made a good display of fore*try exhibits, supplemented by a collection of orchard pests. Another school, in a bush district, showed specimens of the timber and bark of native trees growing within a radius of two miles of the school premises. From a school in the Geelong district cam* a chart of interest to dairymen, showing the percentage of butter-fat in milk at vwrious stages

of milking. There were a number of exhibits of toils and their constituents, and in one case these bad been chemically analysed, with a piece of the rock from which tho soil came originally shown alongside. A collection of specimens of cereal and grasses grown under varying conditions with |ie aid of manure yfoa an exhibit of high educational value. There were many very creditable exhibits of fruits and vegetables, fodder plants, grain, beans, peas and roots, besides, a few model* made by boys from their own designs, one being a rilo in cement, and another an improved cow-bail. Much of the of this admirable display was due to the encouragement given by the State to the teaching of agricultural education and to the xeal and ability of the school teachers—the Agricultural Society's share consisted of offering prizes, and thereby stimulating competition. We trust that the Canterbury A. and P. Association will see fit to offer more encouragement to the school - children next year to tihow what they oqn do ift gardening and farming. It is true that the Association offered prises this year for collections of vegetables grown in school gardens, and for children's collections of dried grasses and weeds, but it could do a "good deal more than this without injuring its finance. Clearly, however, before it can hope to make such a department" of the Show as successful as it ought to be, and could be, it enlist the sympathy and cooperation of the teachers, a matter, we imagine, of no difficulty. With that assured, the school exhibits might very well become in the course of a few years ono of the most interesting and valuable parts of the Show, and the money spent on them by the Association a very profitable investment. The Association already caters in many ways for tho adult farmer; it would only be an extension of its activities on perfectly natural lines if it lent a helping hand to the farmers of the future.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19091115.2.26

Bibliographic details

Press, Press, Volume LXV, Issue 13580, 15 November 1909

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577

SCHOOL EXHIBITS AT SHOWS. Press, Volume LXV, Issue 13580, 15 November 1909

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