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VICTORY FOR MINORU.

A HISTORIC RACE. (mo- OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT). LONDON, May 28. For the first time in i— long history the Derby has been won by a reigning monarch. For the first time since his accession to the throne the King has led a Derby winner to the unsaddling enclosure, while a great multitude of people, in a frensy of sudden joy, burst into the deafening chorus of "God Save the. Bang.' 1

Epsom Downs was more breezy than over, and there were pools of chalky water in the hollows. Occasionally a skidding motor-car would be stranded on the slippery elopes; everywhere streams of white mud poured slowly down tho roadways, and when the sun was not shining the Downs were enveloped m a, blinding mist.. Through his field-glasses the King watched the horses getting ready for the start. Suddenly the sun went behind a cloud, and down came a torrential rain, blowing right in tho faces of the Royal party. There was a note of expectancy more intense than usual in the old familiar cry "They're off I" as it escaped the lips of the people. The King and Queen, the Prince and Princess of Wales and the other members of the Royal party instantly rose to their feet and stood in a line right in front ofs th'e Royal box. His Majesty at once focussed his glasses on his colt, the horses round Tattenham Corner and down the straight mile. He did not move except once, and then only to loan on the edge of the box to get a better view of the race. As the horses came down the straight some one cried, "It's the King's racel" All was excitement in the Royal box. The King, however, never took his glasses from hia eyea until the animals galloped near the grandstand. "It's the King's race—the King's racel The cry grew more confident. When his Majesty's colt, Minoru, flashed pest the winning post half a head in front of the next horse the whole human' panorama on. the Downs completely changed. Thousands upon thousands of people made a- rush for the grandstand. Enclosures were broken into and barriers smashed, while policemen stood helpless before the oncoming' sea of men and women like mere posts in a raging torrent. The King himself if not exactly mobbed, lound himself, on leaving the Royal box, in the centre of a, hustling throng of people, both distinguished and undistinguished. Such exuberance, springing from the heart of popular enthusiasm, has never before been witnessed on an English racecourse, and*-the episode will be remembered as one of the most remarkable in King Edward's life. Richard Marsh, who trained Persimmon and Diamond Jubilee for the Derbys they won when King Edward was Prince of Wales. transferred the bridle rein to his Majesty just outside the gate. Engrossed as the King was in bowing his acknowledgments to congratulations, it was noticed that he found opportunities, of conveying felicitations t6 both his trainer and Herbert Jones, who has ridden his racehorses - since the death of John Watts. Until the "all-right" was given the King stood neathis horse, while the crowd heartily chared Qn ee n Alexandra and the Princess of Wales.. Time after time the National An. them was sung, only to be repeated with greater enthusiasm, when the King and Prince of Wales returned to the Jockey Clu*6 box and again acknowledged the outbursts of cheenrir. ,It looked as ii. the demonstration, would never end; yet the moment the signal was given .that the racecourse was required for some more horse-racing the crowd dispersed in as remarkably a sudden way as it had sprung into existence.

A brown oolt, Minora was bred a:, the Tully Stud Farm, by Colonel W. Hall Walker. Minoru's only success as a two-year-old was on the occasion of his debut in the Great Surrey Foal Stakes at Epsom. Of the other races in which ho took part, he ran second to Louviers, whom he beat yesterday in the Coventry Stekos, second to Battle-Axe in the Newmarket July Stakes, and placed in both the Hopeful Stakes and Newmarket New Nursery Plate. This season he has been successful each time he has nut —in the Gresham Stakes and in tho Two Thousand Guineas. The first to show in front of Wednesday's race —as Brooklands (who was making the running for his stable companion Louviers). Mr Raphael's horse being closely followed by Louviers and Sir Martin. The last-named when half way down the hill struck something and fell, Martin, his jockey, havincr a remarkable escape. Entering the straight Louviers went to the front, hotly pursued by Minoru, William the Fourth and Yalena. Minom gradually but surely began to creep up to the leaders, and a furlong from home he drew level with Louviers. Excitement was intense as the pair ran on practically locked together, and the Royal colt just paired the verdict by the narrowest margin. William tho Fourth, who finished a good third, was unlucky, inasmuch «__, when Sir Margin fell Lord Michelman s colt was leading. Valens finished fourth and B?yardo fifth. Sir Martin was apparently none th» worse for the fall end finished the course alone.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19090707.2.40.1

Bibliographic details

VICTORY FOR MINORU., Press, Volume LXV, Issue 13468, 7 July 1909

Word Count
866

VICTORY FOR MINORU. Press, Volume LXV, Issue 13468, 7 July 1909

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