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OBITUARY.

MR T..1. JOYNT, K.O. Wide-spread regret will bo folt at the death of Sir T. I. Joynt, K.C., which took place yesterday morning, after a short illness. Thomas Ingham Joynt wae horn at Dunmore, County Galway, in December, 1830. After he hod finished his « education, ho went into « lawyer's office in Dublin, where he first became ncquainted with tho late Mr Justico Grosson, by whom he wae subsequently admitted as a barrister and solicitor of the Supremo Court of New Zealand. Towards the end of 1855. Mx Joynt married Miss Abbott, d«ughter of Mr John Abbott. The letter subsequently followed his daughter to Canterbury, and lived for some time on tho North road. Mr Joynt and his wifo and child left in July, 1856, for Lyttelton by tho barque Manner, and had a. most eventful passage The ship wae nearly wrecked, end ran short of provisions and water, only a wineglass, ana a half por aiiult being avoilablo daily, even when in the tropics. Fever also broke out, and there were several deaths. The course of the ship w«s shaped for Hobart, tho nearest port, in order to obtain vegetables, water, and provisions. A fresh etart was then mode for \Yellington, which was readied in Noveinbor, 1856. Tho Canterbury passengers, including Mr and Mrs Joynt, wero transhipped into a topsail schooner called tho Canterbury, and finally they arrived in Lyttolton on December Ist, 1tt.50. Mr Joynt first started in Canterbury 9« Clerk to th© Bench in Lyttolton. Subsequently, ho removed to Christchurch, and took a position ac clerk to Mr (afterwards Mr Justice) G resson, who had started practice on his own account in the house still extant, opposite tho Canterbury Hall, in -Manchester 6tieet. Ho was then articled to Mr T. S. Duncan, then Crown Prosecutor, whose office was onaeite about where Messrs Milner and Thompson's musio wnrehouso now stands. After nerving his articles for five years with Mr Duncan, Mr Joynt wae duly admitted as a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, by Mr Justice Gresson, and commenced practice on his own account in 1863, in a little wooden office on the site in Lichfiold street where His Lordship's Hotel now stands. Ho continued to practice there- for some time, and was shortly ufter elected to represent Kaiapoi in tho Provincial Council. Mr Joynt was also a member of the Provincial Executive, under the Hon. AVilliam Montgomery, ac Provincial Solicitor. He thon entered into partnership with the lato Mr It. D. Thomas, his brother-in-law, under the title of Joynt and Thomas. This partnership was dissolved after a time, and a eecond partnership was formed with Mr Allan William O'Neil. This was followed by a partnership with Mr (now Sir West by) Perceval, and after a while, this being dissolved, Mr Joynt entered into partnership with Mr William Acton Adams. Later, Mr Joynt entered into partnership with Mr Andrews, the firm being known as Joynt and Andrews. During the long period Mr Joynt was at the. Bar here, ho was concerned in numbers of tho cole* bratod cases of Canterbury, both criminal and civil. The case that brought Mr Joynt first into prominence as a criminal lawyer was his successful defence of Mrs Peterson and Mies Williams on. a charge of arson, in connection with a fire in a restaurant kept by them in Cashel street, on tho site now occupied by Mr Sandetein'e jeweller's shop. . He defended Cedeno for the murder of a girl in the .house of tho lato Hon. William Robinson, on Park terrace, and McLcod for tho mur-, der of his wife. Hβ was concorned, besides, in several other important criminal ca&es. On the civil eide, he wse retained in a number of cases, principal nmongst which may be noted Creyke v. Dronefield, and Fowler , v.. Macarthur. Another celebrated caso in which Mr Joynt was concerned wae one at Kaiapoi, in which Mr Keotley sued the Provincial Government for damages to bis property caused by severance in connection with the construct.on of the Northern Railway. It lasted for some weeks, and ultimately resulted in a verdict for the claimant for a considerable cum. Hβ contested one of the Chriatchurch seats in tho General Assembly with the late Mr John Holmes, but wae defeated. When the Government decided to appoint King's Counsel throughout the colony, Mr Joynt wae one of those selected for Canterbury. Aβ a pleader, Mr Joynt was incisive -and eloquent, «nd wae very fond of introducing Scriptural/ quotations into his argument. It was perhaps in addressing juries that Mr Joynt excelled. Ho marshalled his facts with much cogency and point, ■and was usually very successful in convincing those to/whom his argu* menfcs were addressed. Mr Joynt.possessed all the ready wit of his' country, nnd wae a widely read man, and a brilliant conversationalist. Hβ took tho warmest interest in everything having for its object the advancement of Cantcibury and the city, of which he wasexceodingly proud. Hβ leaves a family of five sons and two daughters, his wife havijyj predeceased him. ■As a mark of respect to the memory of (he late Mr Joynt, no defended civil cases wero heard at the Magistrate's Court yesterday. Mr H. W. Bishop, S.M., made feeling reference to the deceased gentleman. Hβ had, he said, been associated with the late Mr Joynt for many .years, and it seonied only a few days ago since they had met in "the Supreme Court on the occasion of tho conferring of tho dignity of K.C. on their friond who was now gone. When he looked back tet tho days whon tho late Mr Joynt's yoioo had been raised in that Court, it made him sad to think that he would hear it no more. Mr Hobon also paid a tribute to Mr Joynt's memory, saving their deceased friend bod been looked upon ne one of the most brilliant men practising in Christchurch. Ho felt euro that the members of tho Bar, especially tho younger ones, would miss him very much.

Mrs Willis, widow of tho late Captain Willis, of Willisden, Southbridge, died ot her residence on Saturdaymorning. at th© age of eoventy-«even, after a ehort illness. The lato Mrs Willis tvns a regular attendant at St. James' church, where sho -will bo much missed. She also took a lively interest in tho Southbridge Horticultural Society, and was a supporter of it sineo its foundation. Tho deceased lady wne of a philanthropic nature, and was always ready to nssist a deserving cause. Sho loivp3 a family of eevoral sons and one daughter. The funeral took place 011 Monday, the cortego leaving Willisden for St. Jamos , church, where a short service wfl<> conducted by the vicar, the Rf-v H. G. Hawkins. The interment took place in tho Elleemero Public Cemetery. The death is announced from Invorcargill of a veteran journalist, in th<» person of Mr Thomas Jteid, who had •been connected with the "Southland Times" for a quarter of a century. Owing to failing health Mr Reid retired from active participation in the responsibilities of the craft about twelve months' ago.

The funeral of Peti Parata, wife of Mr Tamo Parata, M.H.R., took place at Puketeraki yesterday afternoon. Invitations to the tangi were reeponded to by relatives from Masterton and Greytown, Motueka, Stewart Island* andother part* of the oolony. Tho mourners cam© from Southland, Mooraki, Kaiapoi, end Tomuka to the number of 130. Wreaths were eont by Sir Joseph and Lady Ward, ineinbem of the Ministry, and otheri.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19070906.2.34

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Press, Volume LXIII, Issue 12902, 6 September 1907

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1,251

OBITUARY. Press, Volume LXIII, Issue 12902, 6 September 1907

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