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MR CHARLES CLARK.

With the dying of the old year there has rvLX-«:d away on:> of the early f-.et-lens—Mr Chalice Clark—who for a great number ot years was x prominent figure in bminees circles in Christchurch. The late Mr Charles Chirk was Imrn in 1821, and was educated at Chingford Grammar »School, on the borders of Epping For<rt. .Titer kiav- ■ ing school he was articled to Mr Edmund Woodthorpe. architect, son of 'Im Town Clerk of London, who had a large practice. When hie articles had expired he took a position with Me.-«rs Trollope and \Yet?tminster liouw, decorators to tho Queen, land agents, auctioneers, etc., whore ho remained for liiucn years, when his health gave way, and h:» medical attendant order«*l him to take a long boa voyage. ]$ ■- fore leaving the employ of Trollopo Mr Clark was prevsentod with a silver c-iudeiabra in acknowledgment of bus services as trvajsurer to the Beneiit Fund for the employing of the firm. Mr Clark chose New Zeahnd for his future home, ami arrived in Lyttoltoji in the ship Eginont in IVorml>cr, 18o(i. Ix'itig a fellow passenger with the late lliahop Harper and family. Hβ purcjuised a small bock of land comprising seventy-eight fierce on the Hale well road, and started fanning. After working tho farm for four years, he «old it for a good price, and entered into partnership with Mr L-aac Luck, at* land agents, and auctioneers, under the frtylo of Luck and Clark. For several months not a client visited the new firm, but this did not daunt him, and ultimately tho firm came to occupy the leading position in the city. In 1866 Mr Luck retired from the firm, and Mr Clark carried it on on his own account from that date to this. For several years he was engaged as stock salesman at the Carlton Yards, which was the principal stock sale centre prior to the establishment of the Addington yards. In 18G7 Mr Clark erected etock yxrds at Leeston, and carried on operations there in the sale of live and dead stock, land, etc. The opening of the railway in 1875 brought quito a host of auctioneers on tho scene, and Mr Clark retired from etock sales, devoting himself entirely to his largely increasing land, house and auctioneering business. Mr Clark, in tho earlier portion of his residence in Canterbury, took considerable interest in public matters. In 18-57 he was elected as a member of the Provincial Council for the Lincoln District, which at that time included a very largo area, extending from Prebbleton to tho Selwyn. Whilst a member of the Provincial Council Mr Clark was instrumental in getting large grants of money for the carrying out ot main drainage works in the districts of Lincoln, Irwell, Doyleston, Leeston. and Southbridge. He took an active part in tho election, of the late Mr W. W. Moorhouse as superintendent, acting as honorary treasurer to the ejection committee. It was at Mr Clark's suggestion that the late Hon. Wm. RolJeston consented to be nominated as member of the Provincial Council for the Heathcote District, which was his first entry into public life. Mr Rolleston was proposed as a candidate on the occasion by Mr (now Hon. tSir John) Hall, and secouded by Mr Clark. He unsuccessfully contasted tho Sydenham seat, but so pleased was he with his non-success that he gave a banquet to celebrate his failure. For many years Mr Clark was a member of the HalswelJ Road Board. Hβ took a keen and active intenest in volunteering, being a n ember for some time of Mo. 2 Company C.R.V., commanded by Captain White, and of the Canterbury Yeomanry Cavalry under Captain, afterwards Colonel, Reader. Ho was also an active member of the Honorary Reserve Corps, a body formed at the suggestion of the late Captain Harman during the eoare of a itussian invasion. During his long business career in Canterbury, in which he was actively engised from 1860 to 1901, Mr Clark piiwwl through his books on account of clients an enormous amount of money, and it wa.s one of his greatest boasts that all that time he had never been in the law courts on any occasion. He held an auctioneer's licen.so from 1801 to 1895. Mr Clark was twice married, hie first wife dying before h» kit England. In 1860 he married Miss Ellen Charlotte Jarman, who survives him, niece of the late Mr Thotuae Jarman, of the Inner Temple, author of several standard legal works. He has two eons. The eldr»-t. Charles Reginald, was born in 18(i(i, and took his H.A. degree at Exeter College, Oxford, in 188iJ. In 1890 he passed as a barrister at the Middle Temple, aud hi January, 1891, he returned to New Zealand, and in the same year was admitted as a barribter and solicitor of the Supreme Court.' Hi.s second .soil, Leonard Ernest, was horn in 1871, and after completing his studies in Germany with Dr. Miller formerly headmaster of tho Uo.vs' High School, Chrietchurch, roturmti to New Zealand in 1890 and entered hie father's office. Both sons are at present conducting the buriinoß* in Christchurch. As an upright, conscientious bueinea; man, .'Sir Clark stood high in tho estimation of tho whole community, and his deccaso will lie noted with regret by a widn circle of friends. For several years pn<=t Mr Clark hae practically retired from active business, and for some time he has been in a precarious state of health. Ho died early yesterday morning. Tho funeral will leave his late residence, Thorrington, Colombo etreet South, to-day at 3 p.m., for the Jsinwocd CVmcterv.

The death is announced of Mr James Code. on<> of tho early settlers of Soutliland.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19061231.2.37.2

Bibliographic details

MR CHARLES CLARK., Press, Volume LXII, Issue 12689, 31 December 1906

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953

MR CHARLES CLARK. Press, Volume LXII, Issue 12689, 31 December 1906

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