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FUNERAL OF A MAORI CHIEF

THE CAREER OF THE DECEASED. Born in 1812, in a Maori raupo whare, at old Kaiaipohia, Wiremu Nohira Tehoika died in a neut English coiltage with a vinery attached, in the village of Tuahiwii on Tuesday last. In has life of ninety-two years this colony has made remarkable progress. He was a witness of the cruel tribal wars from 1812 to 1830, «md though escarping one of the raids of Te Raupamha at the head of the Ngatitoa in 1827, at the siege of Kaiapoi, waa later captured aa fi. prisoner and released on parole. In 1844 he wae present at the eale of the Maori 'knkie of the South Island to Colonel W. Wakefield, agent for the New Zealand Company, and also when the "pure-base money (£2000) was paid en the Fly in Akaroa Harbour in the year 1848 by Mr Henry Kemp, for the land extending from Mount Grey in Canterbury to Maungutua in Otego. Ifc was Wiremu Nalhira'e contention at all tfbe Native commissions that Ketnp threatened if the £2000 wee not 'accepted by the Ngaitehu (Nar 'hira'e tribe), it would be handed to the Ngatitoa (Rauparaha's tribe), and that if the natives delayed consent to what is known in history as Kemp's deed for the purchase of the native land: of the Middle Island then soldiers would be sent to clear the land for the paheka. Ait tie Native Land Court in April, 1868, end ait the Royal Commission in May, ■■ 1879, Nehira. adhered to those irtutements. As a result at enquiries and representations, reserves Qiave since been made with schools, and medical aid provided for the Maoris. The land valuation of 1848, from a wide hunting domain, has increased, according to the last assessment for unimproved valuation, to £64,783,914. In 1850 Wrremu settled 'down art. Tuahiwi, and remained there till he died. For five or cix years after the death of his brother, Tare Tehoika, he was chairman of the Runaoga, end always held a leading position in native matters. As eteited by the Rev. W. Bla.thwa.yt in an address at the funeral,. Naiuru w&g one who aided the Rev. Oaspn Stack in having the church glebe made in 1859, and -was one of the church officers when the foundation of St. Stephen's Qhuroh was laid by Sir O. Grey in February, 1867. Hie was also one of the chiefs to welcome the Duke of Edinburgh to Canterbury in 1869.

lestcjrday flags were li^ilf-masted" at the pa., but at the funeral there was only a entail" attendance compered with the large assemblages at many of the native .galtherings. This was due to harvesting operations. The body, which was placed in a polished native wood coffin, was conveyed from the house to the church covered with deceased's feather mat and wreaiths. The Hen. H. K. Taifcroa and -ur Tare Tikao were present.. The service was conducted in an impressive manner by the Rev. W. Blathwayt, Mr Taituha Hape, lay-reader, aeweting. The hymn, "Now the Labourer's Task is Over," and another hymn were sung by the choir in the church., Mies Blathwayt, the organist, playing the Dead March. At the close of the service at ithe grave side the choir and natives sang a chant.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/CHP19030206.2.17

Bibliographic details

FUNERAL OF A MAORI CHIEF, Press, Volume LX, Issue 11501, 6 February 1903

Word Count
543

FUNERAL OF A MAORI CHIEF Press, Volume LX, Issue 11501, 6 February 1903

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